Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff

DAVID H. WEGMAN, M.D. (chair), is professor and chair, Department of Work Environment at the University of Massachusetts at Lowell. His research focuses on epidemiological studies of occupational respiratory disease, musculoskeletal disorders, and cancer. He has also written on public health and health policy issues, such as hazard and health surveillance, methods of exposure assessment for epidemiologic studies, the development of alternatives to regulation, and the use of participatory methods to study occupational health risks. He is coeditor with Barry Levy of one of the standard textbooks in the field, Occupational Health: Recognition and the Prevention of Work-Related Disease, the third edition of which was published in 1995. His recent work has focused on developing methods to study subjective outcomes, such as respiratory or irritant symptom reports, and on the health and safety risks among construction workers. He received a B.A. degree from Swarthmore College and M.D. and M.Sc. degrees from Harvard University.

JAMES V. BRUCKNER is professor of pharmacology and toxicology, College of Pharmacy, and director of the Interdisciplinary Program in Toxicology at the University of Georgia. His primary responsibilities include implementation of an active research program and promotion of the development of a graduate program in toxicol-



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Protecting Youth at Work: Health, Safety, and Development of Working Children and Adolescents in the United States Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff DAVID H. WEGMAN, M.D. (chair), is professor and chair, Department of Work Environment at the University of Massachusetts at Lowell. His research focuses on epidemiological studies of occupational respiratory disease, musculoskeletal disorders, and cancer. He has also written on public health and health policy issues, such as hazard and health surveillance, methods of exposure assessment for epidemiologic studies, the development of alternatives to regulation, and the use of participatory methods to study occupational health risks. He is coeditor with Barry Levy of one of the standard textbooks in the field, Occupational Health: Recognition and the Prevention of Work-Related Disease, the third edition of which was published in 1995. His recent work has focused on developing methods to study subjective outcomes, such as respiratory or irritant symptom reports, and on the health and safety risks among construction workers. He received a B.A. degree from Swarthmore College and M.D. and M.Sc. degrees from Harvard University. JAMES V. BRUCKNER is professor of pharmacology and toxicology, College of Pharmacy, and director of the Interdisciplinary Program in Toxicology at the University of Georgia. His primary responsibilities include implementation of an active research program and promotion of the development of a graduate program in toxicol-

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Protecting Youth at Work: Health, Safety, and Development of Working Children and Adolescents in the United States ogy. His current research concerns the basic questions which impact on toxicity risk and assessment using physiologically based pharmacokinetics models. He holds B.S. and M.S. degrees from the University of Texas at Austin College of Pharmacy and a Ph.D. degree from the University of Michigan. MICHAEL I. COHEN is professor and chair of the Department of Pediatrics at Albert Einstein College of Medicine/Montefiore Medical Center. He held a postdoctoral fellowship from the National Institutes of Health at Einstein before beginning his career in exploring the issues of adolescent development. He is the former president and chief executive officer of the Montefire Medical Center in New York, served on the Council on Adolescent Development of the Carnegie Corporation of New York, and was vice-chair of an advisory committee on adolescent health to the Office of Technology Assessment, U.S. Congress. He is a member of the Institute of Medicine, and a trustee of Foundation for Child Development. He has an M.D. degree from Columbia University and did his pediatric training at Babies Hospital in New York. NANCY A. CROWELL (study director) is a staff officer with the Commission on Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education of the National Research Council/National Academy of Sciences. She serves on the staff for the Board on Children, Youth, and Families and the Committee on Law and Justice, and she previously staffed National Research Council studies on violence against women, family violence, risk communication, and policy implications of greenhouse warming. Training as a pediatric audiogist, Crowell worked in a demonstration project for preschool hearing impaired children and their families at Ball State University. She also worked on several political campaigns and for a political polling and consulting firm prior to joining the National Research Council staff. She holds B.S. degrees in mathematics and French from St. Lawrence University and an M.A. in audiology from Vanderbilt University. LETITIA K. DAVIS is director of the Occupational Health Surveillance Program in the Massachusetts Department of Public Health, where she works to develop state-based surveillance systems for work-related illnesses and injuries. She has overseen the formation

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Protecting Youth at Work: Health, Safety, and Development of Working Children and Adolescents in the United States of a physician reporting system for occupational disease, the Massachusetts Occupational Lead Registry, a comprehensive surveillance system for traumatic occupational fatalities, and an experimental surveillance system for work-related injuries to children and adolescents. She has also conducted a number of epidemiological studies and oversees a variety of health and safety educational activities, including a pilot community-based intervention project to enhance the health and safety of young workers. She serves as a visiting lecturer on occupational health at the University of Massachusetts at Lowell, is a member of the Board of Scientific Counselors of the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, and has recently served on the Massachusetts Attorney General's Task Force on Child Labor. She holds a B.A. degree from the University of California at Berkeley, an Ed.M. degree from the Harvard School of Education, and a Sc.D. degree from the Harvard School of Public Health. PETER DORMAN is a faculty member at Evergreen State College. His teaching experience includes micro-and macroeconomic theory and environmental and resource economics. He has published various book and articles on markets and economics, including Markets and Mortality: Economics, Dangerous Work, and the Value of Human Life and The Effect of Free Trade on Contingent Work in Michigan (with K. Roberts and D. Hyatt). His current research concerns trade, international labor standards, and global labor markets; occupational safety and health in contingent employment; and the information structure of organizations and economic regulation. He holds a B.A. degree from the University of Wisconsin and a Ph.D. degree from the University of Massachusetts. SANFORD M. DORNBUSCH is a Reed-Hodgson Professor of human biology, sociology, and education, emeritus, at Stanford University, where he currently serves as chair of the Advisory Board of the Stanford Center on Adolescence. He previously was on the faculty of the University of Washington and Harvard University. He was the first sociologist to be chair of three sections of the American Sociological Association (social psychology, methodology, and education) and was the first nonpsychologist to be elected president of the Society for Research on Adolescence. At Stanford he won the

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Protecting Youth at Work: Health, Safety, and Development of Working Children and Adolescents in the United States Gores Award for excellence in teaching and has been elected president of the Academic Senate, Advisory Board, and the Bookstore and Faculty Club. STEPHEN F. HAMILTON is professor of human development at Cornell University and codirector of the Cornell Youth and Work Program. His primary concerns are with adolescent development and education, particularly the interaction of school, community, and work during the transition from adolescence to adulthood. His study of Germany's apprenticeship system led Apprenticeship for Adulthood: Preparing Youth for the Future, which contrasted the transition from school to career of non-college youth in the United States and Germany and recommended adaptation of elements of apprenticeship in the United States. To test those recommendations, he initiated a youth apprenticeship demonstration project in Broome County, New York. The book and demonstration project helped to shape the School-to-Work Opportunities Act of 1994. He received a B.A. degree in history from Swarthmore College and a Master of Arts in Teaching degree from Harvard, then taught for 3 years in a Washington, D.C., vocational high school before returning to Harvard, where he received a Ph.D. BARBARA C. LEE is a senior scientist with the Marshfield Medical Research Foundation in Wisconsin, where she directs programs dedicated to child safety for the National Farm Medicine Center. She is the director of the National Children's Center for Rural and Agricultural Health and Safety, funded by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health and the federal Maternal and Child Health Bureau. She chaired the National Committee for Childhood Agricultural Injury Prevention, which developed a national action plan that was endorsed and supported by the U.S. Congress in 1996, and she serves on several advisory boards and committees. With funding from private and public sources, she is responsible for a number of research, education, public policy and program evaluation initiatives that address health and safety for children and adolescents who live, play, and work in rural and agricultural settings. She is a past president of the National Institute for Farm Safety. She holds nursing degrees from the College of St. Teresa (B.S.N.), the

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Protecting Youth at Work: Health, Safety, and Development of Working Children and Adolescents in the United States University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire (M.S.N.), and the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee (Ph.D.). JEYLAN T. MORTIMER is professor of sociology at the University of Minnesota and director of the Life Course Center. She has conducted a series of longitudinal research projects related to the social psychology of work, including studies of occupational choice, vocational development in the family and work settings, psychological change in response to work, job satisfaction, work involvement, and the link between work and family life. Since 1987 she has directed the Youth Development Study, an ongoing longitudinal examination of the effects of early work experience on students and its implications for mental health, adjustment, and achievement as they mature. The interrelations of adolescent work and family life are examined in her book, Adolescents, Work, and Family: An Intergenerational Development Analysis (with M. Finch). She is now studying the effects of adolescent work on the timing and patterning of markers of transition to adulthood. She is past chair of the Social Psychology Section and current chair of the Sociology of Children Section of the American Sociological Association and a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. She holds a B.A. degree from Tufts University and M.A. and Ph.D. degrees from the University of Michigan. LINDA RAE MURRAY is a practicing physician in the Division of Occupational Medicine at Cook County Hospital in Chicago. She previously served as medical director of the Near North Health Service Corporation in Chicago. She is on the Board of Health and Medicine Policy Research Group and a member of the American Public Health Association. She holds a B.S. degree from the University of Illinois, a Master of Public Health degree from the School of Public Health, University of Illinois, and an M.D. degree from the Abraham Lincoln School of Medicine. SUSAN H. POLLACK is an assistant professor in the Department of Pediatrics and Preventive Medicine and Environmental Health and at the Kentucky Injury Prevention and Research Center at the University of Kentucky College of Medicine. She is principal and research associate for the Behavioral Research Aspects of Safety Health

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Protecting Youth at Work: Health, Safety, and Development of Working Children and Adolescents in the United States Working Group. She serves as chair for the Pediatric and Adolescent Injury Committee, Injury Control, and Emergency Health Services Section and on the National Committee for Childhood Agricultural Injury Prevention. She holds a B.S. degree from Smith College, an M.S. degree from Georgetown University, and an M.D. degree from Eastern Virginia Medical School. MICHAEL A. SILVERSTEIN is assistant director for Industrial Safety and Health with the Washington State Department of Labor and Industries, a job that includes responsibility for the state's occupational safety and health programs. He recently completed a 2-year assignment as director of Policy for the Occupational Safety and Health Administration in Washington, D.C. Prior to these government positions, Silverstein worked for 15 years on a wide range of issues with the United Automobile Workers Union in Detroit, Michigan, as assistant director for occupational safety and health. Silverstein is a member of the editorial board of the Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine and has authored numerous articles in the areas of occupational edpidemiology and occupational safety and health policy. A board-certified specialist in occupational medicine, he holds degrees from Harvard College, Stanford Medical School, and the School of Public Health at the University of Michigan. DORIS P. SLESINGER is a professor in the Department of Rural Sociology, University of Wisconsin-Madison, and an extension sociologist in University of Wisconsin-Extension. She has served as chair of the department and codirector of the Applied Population Laboratory. She has served on the Health Services Developmental Grants Review Committee of the Agency for Health Care Policy and Research and on the editorial board of the Journal of Rural Health. Her research and publications include medical utilization patterns and health status of rural and minority populations, including farm families, migrant farmworkers, and the Amish. She has published a monograph on mothercraft and infant health and numerous demographic works on various minority populations in Wisconsin. Her current research concerns health and injuries, including pesticide exposure, among migrant farmworkers and their children and access to health insurance of Wisconsin farm families and the self-employed.

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Protecting Youth at Work: Health, Safety, and Development of Working Children and Adolescents in the United States She holds degrees in sociology from Vassar college (A.B.), the University of Michigan (M.A.), and the University of Wisconsin (Ph.D). LAURENCE STEINBERG is a professor in the Department of Psychology at Temple University and director of the MacArthur Foundation Research Network on Adolescent Development and Juvenile Justice. His research has focused on psychological development, education, and mental health during adolescence and on the part-time employment of school-aged youth. A fellow of the American Psychological Association and president of the Society for Research on Adolescence, he has served on the editorial boards of Child Development and Developmental Psychology and as a consultant to the Carnegie Council on Adolescence. He is the author of numerous articles on adolescent development and behavior and the coauthor (with Ellen Greenberger) of When Teenagers Work: The Psychological and Social Costs of Adolescent Employment and Beyond the Classroom: Why School Reform Has Failed and What Parents Need to Do. He holds an A.B. degree in psychology from Vassar College and a Ph.D. in developmental psychology from Cornell University. ANTHONY J. SURUDA is director of occupational medicine and associate professor in the Department of Family and Preventive Medicine at the University of Utah School of Medicine. He directs the Occupational Medicine Clinic and provides patient care consultations and recommendations to employees and unions concerning work-related illnesses and injuries. Licensed in Utah and Colorado, he is a member of the American College of Occupational and Environmental Medicine and the American Public Health Association. He holds degrees from St. Peters College (B.S.), Johns Hopkins University School of Hygiene and Public Health (M.P.H.), and Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine (M.D.). ELLEN G. WIDESS is the executive director of Lead Safe California, a nonprofit, public interest organization dedicated to preventing childhood lead poisoning. Previously, she directed the Pesticide Unit of California's Occupational Safety and Health Administration and the Texas Pesticide Regulatory Program. She has also taught environmental and occupational health law at the University of California-Berkeley and at the University of Texas Law School. Her writing

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Protecting Youth at Work: Health, Safety, and Development of Working Children and Adolescents in the United States includes a chapter on pesticide poisoning and regulation in Occupation Disease and Injury (1991) and a chapter on neurotoxic pesticides and farmworker exposure in Neurotoxicity: New Developments in Neuroscience (1990). She is on the board of directors of the Alliance to End Childhood Lead Poisoning and a member of the Task Force on Lead Based Paint Hazard Reduction and Financing of the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development. She is a member of the California Bar, the California Public Health Association-North, and the American Public Health Association. She received an A.B. degree from the University of California at Berkeley and a J.D. degree from the university's Boalt Hall School of Law.