Grade 9

Grade 10

Grade 11

Grade 12

School Year

Summer

School Year

Summer

School Year

Summer

School Year

Summer

52.72

40.71

44.35

32.33

35.78

24.05

26.42

18.53

16.15

9.41

10.59

5.44

5.87

2.56

4.52

1.61

11.60

9.21

9.48

7.33

7.21

3.89

5.02

3.17

6.96

7.58

7.46

5.19

8.68

4.04

6.98

1.74

2.87

3.56

6.62

3.94

9.88

4.05

10.29

2.44

4.06

7.42

9.34

8.71

14.17

7.99

15.39

8.53

0.94

2.40

3.62

4.96

5.78

5.46

8.63

6.63

1.84

7.65

4.82

13.32

8.25

19.08

14.25

18.78

1.92

10.37

2.41

16.12

3.50

26.88

7.37

36.41

0.93

1.70

1.30

2.68

0.88

2.00

1.11

2.16

funded by the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, National Institutes of Health, and 17 other federal agencies.

whose background characteristics and employment experience may be quite different from those of their counterparts who remain in school.

INTENSITY OF WORK

Not surprisingly, both the percentage of youngsters employed and the hours of employment apparently increase with age. In 1988, according to an analysis of CPS data, 28 percent of all 15-year-olds and 51 percent of all 16-and 17-year-olds held jobs; 15-year-olds with jobs worked an average of 17 hours a week and 19 weeks a year; working 16-and 17-year-olds averaged 21 hours a week and 23 weeks a year at work (U.S. General Accounting Office, 1991). Because these annual data do not differentiate between the school year and summer vacation, the analysis could not estimate the amount of time youngsters worked during the school year. An analysis of 1995 data files from the CPS found that 15-year-olds with jobs worked an average of 11 hours per week during the school year and 19 hours per week during the summer. For 17-year-olds with jobs, the numbers were an average of 18 hours per week during



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