TABLE 3-1 Incidence Rates of Nonfatal Occupational Injuries and Illnesses for All Workers in the Private Sector, by Industry

 

1992

1993

Industry

Total Injuries (per 100 FTE)

Lost Workday Cases (per 100 FTE)

Total Injuries (per 100 FTE)

Lost Workday Cases (per 100 FTE)

All Private Industriesa

8.9

3.9

8.5

3.8

Agriculturea

12.2

5.5

11.5

5.3

Grocery Stores

12.7

5.0

11.3

4.7

Eating Places

9.1

3.1

8.5

3.0

Nursing Homesb

18.6

9.3

17.3

8.9

NOTES: The incidence rates represent the number of injuries and illnesses per 100 full-time equivalent workers and were calculated as follows: (N/EH) × 200,000, where N = number of injuries and illnesses; EH = total hours worked by all employees during the calendar year; and 200,000 = base for 100 full-time equivalent workers (working 40 hours per week, 50 weeks per year). Lost workday cases involve injuries or illnesses that result in days away from work or days of restricted work activity or both.

gency department visits by children and adolescents. The highest rate of injury-related visits occurred among 15-to 17-year-olds (H.B. Weiss et al., 1997).

Occupational injuries and illnesses among young people have typically been overlooked in pediatric health care and pediatric public health. At the same time, occupational health experts have generally focused on the health and safety of adult workers. Consequently, until quite recently, the scientific literature has been notably silent on the subject of occupational injuries and illnesses among children and adolescents. Although information remains limited, a



The National Academies | 500 Fifth St. N.W. | Washington, D.C. 20001
Copyright © National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.
Terms of Use and Privacy Statement