1994

1995

1996

Total Injuries (per 100 FTE)

Lost Workday Cases (per 100 FTE)

Total Injuries (per 100)

Lost Workday Cases (per 100 FTE)

Total Injuries (per 100 FTE)

Lost Workday Cases (per 100 FTE)

8.4

3.8

8.1

3.6

7.4

3.4

10.3

4.8

10.4

4.7

9.4

4.3

11.2

4.7

9.9

4.1

10.1

4.1

7.7

2.6

7.6

2.4

6.2

1.9

16.8

8.4

18.2

8.8

16.5

8.3

aExcludes farms with fewer than 11 employees.

b These figures are for nursing and personal care facilities, the category that includes nursing homes, for which separate rates were not available.

SOURCE: Data from Bureau of Labor Statistics. Available at: http://stats.bls.gov/sahome.html#OSH [1998, February 2].

growing body of research now suggests that occupational injuries contribute to the overall burden of injuries among youth.

This chapter first examines the data on work-related injuries and illnesses among children and adolescents. It then examines the factors that may increase their risk of injuries and illnesses in the work-place. Finally, it includes a review of the available sources of surveillance data and their strengths and weaknesses. Although the information presented here is relevant to both agricultural and nonagricultural settings, the special concerns of agriculture are addressed in Chapter 5.



The National Academies | 500 Fifth St. N.W. | Washington, D.C. 20001
Copyright © National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.
Terms of Use and Privacy Statement