TABLE 3-5 Job Titles, Tasks Ever Done, Equipment Ever Used, in percent

Job Title

%

Tasks Ever Done

%

Equipment Ever Used

%

Cashier

29

Cashier

50

Case cutter

47

Sales Clerk

10

Cleaning

50

Ladder

37

Office Worker

10

Stock shelves

43

Food slicer

19

Work with kids

7

Cook

18

Box crusher

13

Stock shelves

6

Shovel

15

Fat fryer

12

Cook

6

Load trucks

13

Motor vehicle

10

Cleaners

6

Landscape work

10

Power tools

10

Dietary Aide

3

Deliver food by car

4

Forklift

6

NOTE: Data are for students currently working or who had worked in the past.

SOURCE: Data from Massachusetts Department of Public Health and University of North Carolina Injury Prevention Research Center.

Instead, these characteristics must be taken into account so that work environments can be structured to minimize the risks to which young people are exposed.

Experience

Inexperience is not unique to children and adolescents, but it is an inescapable characteristic of young workers. Studies of occupational injuries provide no clear-cut answers about the relative influences of inexperience and an individual worker's personal characteristics (such as age) on the occurrence of hazardous incidents, but a number of studies have found a relationship between injury rates and adult workers' ages. Band and Pismire (1984) reviewed coal-mining injuries and found that younger adult workers had much higher rates of disabling injuries than did older workers. Jensen and Sinkule (1988) report that the risk of amputation while operating a



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