B
Biographies of Committee Members and Staff

Committee Members

JAMES CROOK, Chair, received his B.S. in civil engineering from the University of Massachusetts and his M.S. and Ph.D. in environmental engineering from the University of Cincinnati. He is director of water reuse for the firm Black & Veatch. He was previously with the California Department of Health Services, where he directed the department's water reclamation and reuse program. Dr. Crook has served on several water reuse advisory panels and has been an adviser to the National Sanitation Foundation, Pan American Health Organization, United Nations Development Programme, and U.S. Agency for International Development. He was the principal author of water reuse guidelines published by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and has assisted in the development of water reclamation and reuse criteria for several states.

RICHARD S. ENGELBRECHT, Chair (through August 1996), received a B.A. from Indiana University and M.S. and Sc.D. degrees from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He was a professor of environmental engineering at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Dr. Engelbrecht was one of the world's experts in the field of water pollution research and water quality control and was a member of the National Academy of Engineering. In 1986 he chaired the National Research Council's (NRC's) Committee on Recycling, Reuse, and Conservation in Water Management for Arid Areas, and in 1988-1990 he chaired the NRC's Committee to Review the U.S. Geological Survey's National Water Quality Assessment Pilot Program. He was also a member of the



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--> B Biographies of Committee Members and Staff Committee Members JAMES CROOK, Chair, received his B.S. in civil engineering from the University of Massachusetts and his M.S. and Ph.D. in environmental engineering from the University of Cincinnati. He is director of water reuse for the firm Black & Veatch. He was previously with the California Department of Health Services, where he directed the department's water reclamation and reuse program. Dr. Crook has served on several water reuse advisory panels and has been an adviser to the National Sanitation Foundation, Pan American Health Organization, United Nations Development Programme, and U.S. Agency for International Development. He was the principal author of water reuse guidelines published by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and has assisted in the development of water reclamation and reuse criteria for several states. RICHARD S. ENGELBRECHT, Chair (through August 1996), received a B.A. from Indiana University and M.S. and Sc.D. degrees from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He was a professor of environmental engineering at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Dr. Engelbrecht was one of the world's experts in the field of water pollution research and water quality control and was a member of the National Academy of Engineering. In 1986 he chaired the National Research Council's (NRC's) Committee on Recycling, Reuse, and Conservation in Water Management for Arid Areas, and in 1988-1990 he chaired the NRC's Committee to Review the U.S. Geological Survey's National Water Quality Assessment Pilot Program. He was also a member of the

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--> NRC's Mexico City Water Supply (1995) and Quality Criteria for Water Reuse (1982) committees and was a founding member of the Water Science and Technology Board. MARK M. BENJAMIN earned a B.S. in chemical engineering from Carnegie-Mellon University and an M.S. in chemical engineering and a Ph.D. in civil engineering from Stanford University. He is currently a professor in the Department of Civil Engineering at the University of Washington. His research interests include aquatic chemistry, the structure and reactivity of natural organic matter, treatment of toxic metals in industrial and municipal wastewater, and the chemistry of corrosion in water treatment systems. RICHARD J. BULL received his B.S. in pharmacology from the University of Washington and his Ph.D. in pharmacology from the University of California, San Francisco. He spent 14 years in Cincinnati, where his last position was as director of the Toxicology and Microbiology Division of the Environmental Protection Agency's Health Effects Research Laboratory. He spent 10 years on the faculty of the College of Pharmacy at Washington State University (1984-1994). In 1994, he moved to Battelle's Pacific Northwest Division, where he works in the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory of the Department of Energy. His research has remained in the area of health hazards associated with drinking water from a variety of sources. His most recent research deals with mechanisms of adverse effects that are induced by the haloacetate group of disinfectant by-products. Dr. Bull is an active member of several societies and has served on several NRC committees, including the Subcommittee on Disinfectants and the Committee on Recycling, Reuse, and Conservation in Water Management for Arid Areas. BRUCE A. FOWLER earned a B.S. in fisheries/marine biology from the University of Washington and a Ph.D. in pathology from the University of Oregon. He directs the program in toxicology at the University of Maryland and is a professor in the Department of Pathology at the University of Maryland Medical School. Prior to 1987, he held the positions of senior staff fellow and research biologist at the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences in North Carolina. He chaired the NRC Committee on Measuring Lead in Critical Populations and was a member of the Toxicology, Women in Science and Engineering, and the Biological Markers of Urinary Toxicology committees. He chaired the Maryland Governor's Council on Toxic Substances. He was Fulbright Fellow to the Karolinska Institute in 1994 and is the winner of the 1998 Society of Toxicology Colgate-Palmolive Visiting Professorship to the University of Washington in in vitro toxicology. His research interests include the ultrastructural/biochemical characterization of mechanisms of cell injury from exposure to trace metals in mammals and marine organisms in rela-

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--> tion to intracellular binding of both toxic and essential metals; biochemical mechanisms of metal-induced alterations of cellular heme metabolism; and molecular mechanisms of metal-induced alterations in gene expression. HERSCHEL E. GRIFFIN received a B.A. from Stanford University and an M.D. from the University of California Medical School, with an internship in surgery at the University of California Hospital, residence in surgery at San Francisco Hospital, and subsequent graduate work in preventive medicine and public policy. He is professor emeritus of epidemiology at the Graduate School of Public Health, San Diego State University. Prior to his university appointment, Dr. Griffin was a practicing surgeon with the U.S. Army and was chief of the Communicable Disease Branch and the Preventive Medicine Division of the Office of the Surgeon General, among other posts. He also had a private medical practice. He has served on numerous health advisory boards and is presently on the California Potable Reuse Committee, established to advise the State of California. He has served on several NRC committees and is a past member of the NRC's Board on Toxicology and Environmental Health Hazards. CHARLES N. HAAS earned a B.S. in biology and an M.S. in environmental engineering from the Illinois Institute of Technology and a Ph.D. in environmental engineering from the University of Illinois. He is the Betz Chair Professor of Environmental Engineering at Drexel University. He was formerly a professor and acting chair in the Department of Environmental Engineering at the Illinois Institute of Technology. His areas of research involve microbial and chemical risk assessment, hazardous waste processing, industrial wastewater treatment, waste recovery, and modeling wastewater disinfection and chemical fate and transport. He has chaired a number of professional conferences and workshops, has served as a member of several advisory panels to the Environmental Protection Agency, and is currently on an advisory committee to the Philadelphia Department of Health. CHRISTINE L. MOE earned a B.A. in biology from Swarthmore College and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in environmental sciences and engineering from the University of North Carolina. She is an assistant professor in the Department of Epidemiology, University of North Carolina, and an adjunct assistant professor in the Division of Environmental and Occupational Health at the Emory University School of Public Health. Prior to that, she was a fellow in the Division of Viral and Rickettsial Diseases at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta. Her areas of research involve environmental transmission of infectious agents, especially waterborne disease, and the diagnosis and epidemiology of enteric viral infections.

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--> JOAN B. ROSE earned an M.S. from the University of Wyoming and a Ph.D. in microbiology from the University of Arizona. She is currently a professor in the Marine Science Department at the University of South Florida. Prior to holding that position, she was a professor in the Environmental and Occupational Health Department at the University of South Florida. Dr. Rose is a fellow of the American Academy of Microbiology and past president of the Florida Environment Health Association. Her research has focused on methods for detection of bacteria, viruses, and parasites in wastewater, drinking water, and the environment, as well as on risk assessment and water treatment for removal of pathogens. She served on the NRC's Committee on Wastewater Management for Coastal Urban Areas. R. RHODES TRUSSELL earned a B.S. in civil engineering and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in sanitary engineering from the University of California, Berkeley. He is the lead drinking water technologist for Montgomery Watson, Inc. He has been involved with the evaluation of water reuse alternatives in a number of settings. He was involved in designing one of California's first major water reclamation facilities (Water Factory 21) and currently directs the San Diego Indirect Potable Reuse Project. Dr. Trussell serves on the Environmental Protection Agency Science Advisory Board's Committee on Drinking Water. He has served on a number of NRC committees and is a member of the National Academy of Engineering. Staff JACQUELINE A. MACDONALD is associate director of the National Research Council's Water Science and Technology Board. She directed the studies that led to the reports Innovations in Ground Water and Soil Cleanup; Alternatives for Ground Water Cleanup; In Situ Bioremediation: When Does It Work?; Safe Water From Every Tap: Improving Water Service to Small Communities; and Freshwater Ecosystems: Revitalizing Educational Programs in Limnology. She received the 1996 National Research Council Award for Distinguished Service. Ms. MacDonald earned an M.S. degree in environmental science in civil engineering from the University of Illinois, where she received a university graduate fellowship and Avery Brundage scholarship, and a B.S. degree magna cum laude in mathematics from Bryn Mawr College. GARY KRAUSS directed this study as staff officer at the National Research Council's Water Science and Technology Board until July 1997. He received his B.S. in zoology from Drew University and M.S. in ecology from the Pennsylvania State University. He directed the studies that led to the reports Mexico City's Water Supply; The Use of Treated Municipal

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--> Wastewater Effluents and Sludge in the Production of Crops for Human Consumption; and Water and Sanitation Services for Megacities in the Developing World. ELLEN A. DE GUZMAN is a senior project assistant at the National Research Council's Water Science and Technology Board. She received a B.A. from the University of the Philippines and is currently taking classes in economics at the University of Maryland University College. Editor DAVID A. DOBBS is a freelance writer and editor specializing in environmental, building, health, and science issues. His book The Northern Forest, coauthored with Richard Ober, won the Vermont Book Publishers Association Book of the Year award in 1995. Dobbs has edited texts on sports physiology, construction, sailing, horticulture, and natural resources issues; he writes frequently for a variety of publications including Popular Science, Forest Notes, Boston Globe, Vermont, Vermont Life, Parenting, and Eating Well. Originally from Texas, he received his B.A. degree from Oberlin College and now lives in Montpelier, Vermont.