Appendix A
Papers Presented at International Conference on Ecosystem Management for Sustainable Marine Fisheries,
Monterey, California
February 19–24, 1996
1

Arnason, Ragnar, University of Iceland. Ecological fisheries management using individual transferable share quotas.

Bingham, Nathaniel, Pacific Coast Federation of Fishermen's Associations. Humans impact both resources and the environment.

Burkholder, JoAnn, North Carolina State University. How do blooms of harmful microalgae and heterotropic dinoflagellates impact management of sustainable fisheries?

Castilla, Juan Carlos, and Miriam Fernandez, Pontificia Universidad de Chile. Small-scale benthic fisheries in Chile: a lesson on comanagement and sustainable use of benthic invertebrates.

Christensen, Villy, and Daniel Pauly, University of British Columbia. Marine ecosystem management: an ode to Odum.

Clark, Colin, University of British Columbia. Refugia.

Clark, Jerry, National Fish and Wildlife Foundation, and Dayton Lee Alverson, Natural Resources Consultants, Inc. Are present resource management systems adequate?

Clark, Jerry, National Fish and Wildlife Foundation. Case study: Atlantic salmon.

Clark, Jerry, National Fish and Wildlife Foundation. Case study: Shrimp/red snapper.

Dewees, Christopher, University of California. Summary of individual quota systems and their effects on New Zealand and British Columbia fisheries.

1  

Many of these papers have been published in Ecological Applications 8(1), Supplement (1998).

 



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OCR for page 149
--> Appendix A Papers Presented at International Conference on Ecosystem Management for Sustainable Marine Fisheries, Monterey, California February 19–24, 19961 Arnason, Ragnar, University of Iceland. Ecological fisheries management using individual transferable share quotas. Bingham, Nathaniel, Pacific Coast Federation of Fishermen's Associations. Humans impact both resources and the environment. Burkholder, JoAnn, North Carolina State University. How do blooms of harmful microalgae and heterotropic dinoflagellates impact management of sustainable fisheries? Castilla, Juan Carlos, and Miriam Fernandez, Pontificia Universidad de Chile. Small-scale benthic fisheries in Chile: a lesson on comanagement and sustainable use of benthic invertebrates. Christensen, Villy, and Daniel Pauly, University of British Columbia. Marine ecosystem management: an ode to Odum. Clark, Colin, University of British Columbia. Refugia. Clark, Jerry, National Fish and Wildlife Foundation, and Dayton Lee Alverson, Natural Resources Consultants, Inc. Are present resource management systems adequate? Clark, Jerry, National Fish and Wildlife Foundation. Case study: Atlantic salmon. Clark, Jerry, National Fish and Wildlife Foundation. Case study: Shrimp/red snapper. Dewees, Christopher, University of California. Summary of individual quota systems and their effects on New Zealand and British Columbia fisheries. 1   Many of these papers have been published in Ecological Applications 8(1), Supplement (1998).  

OCR for page 149
--> Done, Terry, and R.E. Reichelt, Australian Institute of Marine Science. The role of integrated coastal zone management in achieving sustainable marine fisheries through managing ecosystems. Folke, Carl, and Nils Kautsky, Stockholm University. The ecological footprint concept for sustainable seafood production. Fujita, Rodney, and Ianthe Zevos, Environmental Defense Fund. Innovative approaches for fostering conservation in marine fisheries. Fujita, Rodney, Environmental Defense Fund. Case study: Restoring the ecological integrity of the South Florida landscape/seascape. Hofmann, Eileen, Old Dominion University, and Thomas Powell, University of California. The environment affects biological systems. Hofmann, Eileen, Old Dominion University. Case study: Antarctic krill fishery. Houde, Edward, Chesapeake Biological Laboratory, and Ellen Pikitch, University of Washington. Biological resources interact in complex ways. Houde, Edward, Chesapeake Biological Laboratory. Case study: Sustaining fisheries in the Chesapeake Bay. Kaly, U.L., James Cook University, Australia. Mangrove restoration: a potential ecosystem management tool for sustainable development. Kurien, John, Center for Developmental Studies, India. Old proverbs of Asian coastal communities. Lubchenco, Jane, Oregon State University, and Simon Levin, Princeton University. The importance and challenge of sustainability. Magnuson, John, University of Wisconsin. Case study: Laurentian Great Lakes. Magnuson, John, University of Wisconsin. Case study: Salmon in the Pacific Northwest. Matsuda, Hiroyuki, et al., Kyushi University. Mathematical ecology for sustainable use of the plankton-feeding pelagic fishes. McCay, Bonnie, Rutgers University. Humans impact both resources and the environment. McCay, Bonnie, Rutgers University. Case study: ITQs in two fisheries. Munro, Gordon, University of British Columbia. Humans impact both resources and the environment: an economist's perspective. Munro, Gordon, University of British Columbia. Case study: Northern cod. National Research Council (1996). Case study: The Bering Sea ecosystem (discussion of a report). Paine, Robert, University of Washington. Case study: Sea otters. Pauly, Daniel, University of British Columbia; and Michael Sissenwine, National Marine Fisheries Service, Woods Hole. The nature of marine ecosystems.

OCR for page 149
--> Pauly, Daniel, University of British Columbia. Case study: Developing on the edge of an abyss: the fisheries of the Philippines. Pinkerton, Evelyn, University of British Columbia. The role of dispute resolution in new paradigms for marine ecosystem management. Pope, John G., and J.W. Horwood, Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries, and Food, United Kingdom. Monitoring the marine ecosystem for sustainable fisheries: East Atlantic approaches. Roughgarden, Jonathan, Stanford University, California. How to manage fisheries. Sissenwine, Michael, National Marine Fisheries Service, Woods Hole. Sustaining fisheries by ecosystem management. Spratt, J.D. Case study: The herring fishery in San Francisco Bay (discussion of a paper). Steele, John H., Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. Marine ecosystems: sustainable for fungible? Steele, John H., Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. Regime shifts in fisheries management. Williams, Meryl, ICLARM, Philippines. Case study: Shrimp and mangroves.