Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff

ALAN ALTSHULER (Co-chair) is the Ruth and Frank Stanton professor of urban policy and planning at Harvard University, with a joint appointment in the Kennedy School of Government and the Design School. He is also director of the Kennedy School's Taubman Center for State and Local Government. Prior to joining the Harvard faculty in 1988, he was dean of the Graduate School of Public Administration at New York University (1983-1988), a professor of political science at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (1966-1971, 1975-1983), and secretary of transportation for the state of Massachusetts (1971-1975). His research interests focus on urban politics and on policy for the built environment. His most recent books are Regulation for Revenue (with Jose Gómez-Ibáñez) and Innovation in American Government (with Robert Behn and others). He has a Ph.D. in political science from the University of Chicago.

WILLIAM MORRILL (Co-chair) is a senior fellow at Mathtech, Inc., an applied research and consulting firm, and formerly its president. Previously, he was president of Mathematica Policy Research, Inc.; assistant secretary for planning and evaluation of the U.S. Department of Health, Education, and Welfare; assistant director of the U.S. Office of Management and Budget; and deputy county executive of Fairfax County, Virginia. He has served as member and chair on a wide range of panels and committees of the National Research Council. His current research is centered on a range of education and human service policy issues. He has a bachelor's degree in government from Wesleyan University and an M.P.A. from the Maxwell School, Syracuse University.



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Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff ALAN ALTSHULER (Co-chair) is the Ruth and Frank Stanton professor of urban policy and planning at Harvard University, with a joint appointment in the Kennedy School of Government and the Design School. He is also director of the Kennedy School's Taubman Center for State and Local Government. Prior to joining the Harvard faculty in 1988, he was dean of the Graduate School of Public Administration at New York University (1983-1988), a professor of political science at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (1966-1971, 1975-1983), and secretary of transportation for the state of Massachusetts (1971-1975). His research interests focus on urban politics and on policy for the built environment. His most recent books are Regulation for Revenue (with Jose Gómez-Ibáñez) and Innovation in American Government (with Robert Behn and others). He has a Ph.D. in political science from the University of Chicago. WILLIAM MORRILL (Co-chair) is a senior fellow at Mathtech, Inc., an applied research and consulting firm, and formerly its president. Previously, he was president of Mathematica Policy Research, Inc.; assistant secretary for planning and evaluation of the U.S. Department of Health, Education, and Welfare; assistant director of the U.S. Office of Management and Budget; and deputy county executive of Fairfax County, Virginia. He has served as member and chair on a wide range of panels and committees of the National Research Council. His current research is centered on a range of education and human service policy issues. He has a bachelor's degree in government from Wesleyan University and an M.P.A. from the Maxwell School, Syracuse University.

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LAWRENCE DAHMS has been executive director for 21 years of the Metropolitan Transportation Commission, which serves as a 19-member governing board that represents nine counties and 100 cities in the San Francisco Bay area. Previously he was employed by the Army Corps of Engineers, the California legislature, BART, Arthur D. Little, Inc., and Caltrans. He has participated on several study committees established by the Transportation Research Board and other units of the National Research Council. In 1996, he was the recipient of the W.N. Carey, Jr., distinguished service award, which recognizes individuals who have given outstanding leadership and service to transportation research. He has a B.S. in civil engineering from San Diego State University and an M.B.A. from Sacramento State University. MARTHA DERTHICK is the Julia Allen Cooper professor at the Woodrow Wilson Department of Government and Foreign Affairs at the University of Virginia. She teaches courses in American public policy and political institutions, including federalism. She is editor of Dilemmas of Scale in America's Federal Democracy, which explores the tradition of local self-government in the United States. She has a Ph.D. in political science from Radcliffe College. ANTHONY DOWNS is a senior fellow at the Brookings Institution in Washington, D.C. Prior to joining Brookings, he was a member for 18 years and then chairman of Real Estate Research Corporation, a nationwide consulting firm advising private and public decision makers on real estate investment, housing policies, and urban affairs. He has served as a consultant to many of the nation's largest corporations, major developers, and private foundations, as well as to dozens of local, state, and national government agencies. He has a Ph.D. in economics from Stanford University and is the author or coauthor of 20 books and over 400 articles. JAMES GIBSON serves as project director and president of DC Agenda, a nonprofit community assistance corporation dedicated to addressing issues facing the District of Columbia. He has been a senior associate at the Urban Institute since January 1993, where he focuses on civil rights policies, community development, urban governance, economic and social opportunities, and antipoverty strategies. He was formerly director of the Eugene and Agnes E. Meyer Foundation in Washington, D.C. Other positions he has held include assistant city administrator for planning and development for Washington, D.C., and executive associate of the Potomac Institute. GENEVIEVE GIULIANO is a professor in the School of Policy, Planning, and Development, University of Southern California. Prior to July 1998, she was professor and director of the Lusk Center Research Institute, School of Urban Planning and Development at USC. Her research interests include relationships

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between land use and transportation, transportation policy evaluation, impacts of information technology on transportation and travel behavior, and mobility patterns of low-income households. Results of her research have been published extensively, and she has presented numerous papers at conferences both within the United States and abroad. She has participated in several National Research Council committee projects, and is a member of several expert advisory panels and editorial boards. She has a Ph.D. in social sciences from the University of California at Irvine. STEPHEN GODWIN is director of the Studies and Information Services Division of the Transportation Research Board (TRB) of the National Research Council. He has been with TRB since 1983 and oversees policy studies at the request of Congress and the executive branch dealing with economic, safety, environmental, and research policy issues in transportation. Before joining TRB, he was a research associate at the Urban Institute in Washington, D.C., and also worked in the Policy Studies Office of the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development. He has a B.A. in religion and philosophy and an M.A. in regional planning from the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. HARRY HOLZER is chief economist of the U.S. Department of Labor, while on leave from his position as a professor of economics at Michigan State University. His research has focused on the employment problems of disadvantaged workers, particularly urban minorities. More recently he has focused on employer skill needs and hiring practices and how these influence the employment outcomes of unskilled workers. His major publications include The Black Youth Employment Crisis (coedited with Richard B. Freeman) and What Employers Want: Job Prospects for Less-Educated Workers. He is a research affiliate of the Institute for Research on Poverty at the University of Wisconsin and a national fellow in the Program on Inequality and Social Policy at Harvard University. He has a bachelor's degree and a Ph.D. in economics from Harvard University. CHRISTOPHER LEINBERGER is a founding partner of the Arcadia Land Company in Santa Fe, New Mexico, which is dedicated to land stewardship and building a sense of community. Since 1979, he has also been managing director and co-owner of Robert Charles Lesser and Company, which is the largest independent real estate advisory firm in the country. His work as a land use strategist and developer combines an understanding of business realities and concern for the nation's social and environmental issues. He has focused on corporate strategic planning for real estate companies and metropolitan development trends. He has been active on several committees of the National Research Council. His research and publications run the gamut of economic, social, and environmental implications of land use patterns; he is author of Strategic Planning for Real

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Estate. He is a graduate of the Harvard Business School and majored in urban sociology and politics as an undergraduate at Swarthmore College. FAITH MITCHELL is director of the Social and Economic Studies Division of the Commission on Social and Behavioral Sciences and Education at the National Research Council. From 1993 to 1994, she was senior coordinator for population in the Bureau of Population, Refugees, and Migration of the U.S. Department of State. Previously, she directed the population program of the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation in Menlo Park, California, was a program executive at the San Francisco Foundation, and was assistant professor at the Institute for Health Policy Studies at the University of California in San Francisco. She has a Ph.D. in medical anthropology from the University of California at Berkeley and a B.A. from the University of Michigan. MYRON ORFIELD is a fifth-term member of the Minnesota House of Representatives, representing southwest Minneapolis. In this capacity, he has authored sweeping legislation for metropolitan reform, creating the nation's most substantial regional government and reforming land use and fiscal equity laws in the Twin Cities area. He has become nationally recognized as an expert in the area of metropolitan planning and policy making. As the executive director of the Metropolitan Area Research Corporation, he has completed studies of regional polarization in 14 of the 25 largest metropolitan areas of the United States. His recent publications include Metropolitics: A Regional Agenda for Community and Stability. He has a B.A. from the University of Minnesota and a law degree from the University of Chicago Law School. He has practiced law in both the public and private sectors and currently teaches as an adjunct professor of law at the University of Minnesota Law School. NEAL PEIRCE is a leading writer about metropolitan regions, their political and economic dynamics, and their emerging national and global roles. He is the lead author of Citistates. With Curtis Johnson, he has coauthored the Peirce Reports, on compelling issues of metropolitan futures for leading newspapers in 16 regions across the nation. In 1975, he began—and continues today—the United States' first national column focused on state and local government themes, syndicated by the Washington Post Writers Group. His 10-book series on America's states and regions culminated in The Book of America: Inside 50 States Today. He was one of the founders and then a contributing editor of National Journal and served in the 1960s as political editor of Congressional Quarterly. He is known widely as a lecturer on regional, urban, federal system, and community development issues. PAUL PETERSON is the Henry Lee Shattuck professor of government and director of the Program on Education Policy and Governance at Harvard Univer-

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sity. He is a former director of the Governmental Studies Program at the Brookings Institution. He has a Ph.D. from the University of Chicago, where he was a professor in the Departments of Political Science and Education for many years. He is the author or editor of over 60 articles and 17 books, including Earning and Learning: How Schools Matter, Learning from School Choice, The Politics of School Reform: 1870-1940, and City Limits. He chaired the Social Science Research Council's Committee on the Urban Underclass and has served on many National Research Council committees. DEBORAH STONE is the coordinator of intergovernmental affairs for Cook County, Illinois, a local government with a population of over 5 million people. Prior to that, she was executive director of the Metropolitan Planning Council of Chicago, a business-based civic organization. Her past work covers regionalism, transportation planning, health care policy, public housing reform, and tax policy. Currently, she is involved with legislation and policy on juvenile and criminal justice, welfare reform, and public finance. She has an M.A. in public policy from the University of Chicago and a B.A. from Beloit College. CATHERINE WITHERSPOON is the senior policy advisor to the chairman of the Air Resources Board of the California Environmental Protection Agency. She has worked on air quality issues for the past 18 years in government, consulting, and volunteer positions and at the regional, state, and federal levels. During the study period, she was legislative director at the South Coast Air Quality Management District. She has a bachelor's degree in politics from the University of California at Santa Cruz. HAROLD WOLMAN (Consultant) is professor of policy sciences and director of the Policy Sciences Graduate Program at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County. Prior to that he was a professor of political science and urban affairs in the College of Urban, Labor and Metropolitan Affairs at Wayne State University. His research and publications have been in the areas of urban policy and politics, comparative urban policy, economic and community development, and housing. His current research interests include the impact of sprawl and fragmentation on the poor in metropolitan areas, how local governments learn from one another, and changes in the representation of urban interests in Congress. He has a bachelor's degree in political science from Oberlin College, a master's degree in city planning from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and a Ph.D. in political science from the University of Michigan. JULIAN WOLPERT is the Henry G. Bryant professor of geography, public affairs and urban planning at Princeton University's Woodrow Wilson School. Prior to joining the Princeton faculty, he was professor of geography and regional science at the University of Pennsylvania. He has conducted extensive research

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on migration, locational issues, and the service sector and has written widely on urban development and nonprofit provision of services. His current research interests include federalism issues and the niche of charity and philanthropy in the nation's three-sector economy. He has a bachelor's degree from Columbia University and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in geography from the University of Wisconsin.

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