NATHAN M. NEWMARK

September 22, 1910-January 25, 1981

BY WILLIAM J. HALL

NATHAN MORTIMORE NEWMARK, internationally known educator and engineer, died January 25, 1981, in Urbana, Illinois. Dr. Newmark was widely known for his research in structural engineering and structural dynamics at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, for his contributions to the design of earthquake-resistant structures—including the Latino Americana Tower in Mexico City—and, most recently, for his work on the design of the trans-Alaska pipeline.

EDUCATION AND EARLY CAREER

Nathan M. Newmark was born in Plainfield, New Jersey, on September 22, 1910, to Abraham S. and Mollie Nathanson Newmark. He married Anne May Cohen on August 6, 1931, and is survived by his wife and three children, Richard, Linda (Mrs. James Bylander), and Susan (Mrs. Paul Mayfield).

After receiving his early education in North Carolina and New Jersey he attended Rutgers University. There he accumulated a number of prizes and graduated in 1930 with high honors—including special honors in civil engineering—giving evidence of his unusual skills and talents at a young age. He then enrolled as a graduate student at the University of Illinois in Urbana where he worked under the late professors



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