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Notes

1. The Internet standards are specified in a series of documents called RFCs, or Requests for Comments, which are available on the Internet. Contact rfc-info@isi.edu.

2. These numbers are from the international connectivity data collected by Larry Landweber and provided by the Internet Society as a part of its Web information collection. See http://info.isoc.org/home.html.

3. All Internet standards are published for use in any way without any constraints or license. This perhaps represents the most open form of "open."

4. CSSP [3], p. 16, example 3A.

5. CSSP [3], p. 17, example 3E.

6. Note that this proposal does not support the interworking of an SNA application with an Internet application. By our definition of interworking, that would require a spanning layer specific to each pair of applications to be interconnected. The goal here is more modest: to take existing applications from either protocol suite and support them over a new spanning layer that allows them to sit above both TCP and SNA.

7. There are examples where a spanning layer tries to avoid a common address space by supporting multiple address spaces or by translating among several. These approaches are often complex.



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