Appendices



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--> Appendices

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--> Appendix A Biographical Sketches of Committee Members William Agnew (chair) (NAE) retired as director of programs and plans for General Motors (GM) Research Laboratories in 1989. From 1944 to 1946, Dr. Agnew served in the Manhattan District, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, at the Los Alamos Laboratory. He attended Purdue University from 1946 to 1952. From 1952 to 1989, he held a number of positions at GM Research Laboratories, including department head of fuels and lubricants; head of the Emissions Research Department; technical director of the Engine Research, Engineering Mechanics, Mechanical Research, Fluid Dynamics, and Fuels and Lubricants departments; and technical director of the Biomedical Science, Environmental Science, Societal Analysis, and Transportation Research departments. His technical expertise spans internal combustion engines, gas turbines, engine performance, automotive air pollution, and automotive power plants. He has a Ph.D. in mechanical engineering from Purdue University. Robert Aldrich is president of Pridtronics, Inc., a manufacturer of energy storage devices, and chairman of Tailored Energy, Inc., an energy services company that provides on-site products to commercial and small industrial customers. His previous positions include group vice president of the Business and Finance Division and vice president of the Integrated Energy Systems Division of the Electric Power Research Institute; research and development projects director, Niagara Mohawk Power; and director, Life and Materials Science Center, Syracuse University Research Corporation. Dr. Aldrich has been a member of various professional organizations, including the Presidents Association and International Council of the American Management Association, and a member of the Board of Advisors at Syracuse University. He has extensive experience in energy conver-

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--> sion technologies, fuel cells, materials science, and R&D management. He received his Ph.D. in solid state science and technology from Syracuse University. Fred C. Anson (NAS) is Elizabeth W. Gilloon Professor of Chemistry, Division of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, California Institute of Technology, where he has been a faculty member since 1957 and was chair of the Division of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering from 1984 to 1994. He has been a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the recipient of a number of awards, including the David C. Grahame Award from the Electrochemical Society, the Alexander von Humboldt Award from the Fritz Haber Institut der Max Planck Gesellschaft, and the C.N. Reilley Award in Electroanalytical Chemistry. He has conducted research in a number of areas related to fuel cells and batteries. He received his Ph.D. from Harvard University. Robert Epperly is president of Epperly Associates, Inc., a consulting firm. From 1994 to 1997, he was president of Catalytica Advanced Technologies, Inc., a company that develops new catalytic technologies for the petroleum and chemical industries. Prior to joining Catalytica, he was general manager of Exxon Corporate Research and director of the Exxon Fuels Research Laboratory. After leaving Exxon, he was chief executive officer of Fuel Tech N.V., a company that develops new combustion and air pollution control technology. Mr. Epperly has authored or co-authored more than 50 publications on technical and managerial topics, including two books, and has 38 U.S. patents. He has extensive experience in fuels, fuel cells, engines, catalysis, air pollution control, and R&D management. He received an M.S. degree in chemical engineering from Virginia Polytechnic Institute. Anthony J. Finizza is the chief economist at Atlantic Richfield Company, a position he has held since 1985. His responsibilities include monitoring alternative fuel vehicle developments and energy/economic studies. Prior to 1985, he was regional vice president of Data Resources, Inc. (1970 to 1975) and vice president and economist of Northern Trust Company (1968 to 1970). Dr. Finizza has contributed his expertise to various professional organizations, including the International Association for Energy Economics, of which he was president in 1996. He received his Ph.D. in economics from the University of Chicago. Thomas M. Jahns is drives program manager at GE Corporate Research and Development. He is currently on a two-year research sabbatical as a senior lecturer and co-director of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)/Industry Consortium on Advanced Automotive Electrical/Electronic Components and Systems, where he directs and is actively engaged in research on new electrical system architectures and advanced accessory subsystems for future automotive vehicles. He has been manager of the Power Electronics Control Program at

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--> General Electric Corporate Research and Development and was a senior engineer at Gould Corporate Laboratories. He is a fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineering (IEEE), and has served as president of the IEEE Power Electronics Society, and chair of the Industrial Drives Committee of the IEEE Industry Applications Society. He has a Ph.D. in electrical engineering from MIT. John H. Johnson is Distinguished Presidential Professor, Department of Mechanical Engineering-Engineering Mechanics, at Michigan Technological University (MTU) and a fellow of the Society of Automotive Engineers. His experience spans a wide range of analysis and experimental work related to advanced engine concepts, emissions studies, fuel systems, and engine simulation. Before joining the mechanical engineering faculty at MTU, he was project engineer at the U.S. Army Tank Automotive Center and chief engineer at Applied Engine Research at International Harvester Company. He was chair of the MTU Mechanical Engineering Department from 1986 to 1993. Dr. Johnson has served on many committees related to engine technology, engine emissions, and health effects for the Society of Automotive Engineers, the National Research Council, the Combustion Institute, the Health Effects Institute, and the Environmental Protection Agency. He is also a consultant for a number of government and private sector institutions. He received his Ph.D. in mechanical engineering from the University of Wisconsin, Madison. Parker D. Mathusa is director of the Energy Resources, Transportation and Environmental Research Program at the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority. He is responsible for establishing research programs and policies to develop new energy technologies and environmental mitigation measures that will contribute to New York state's energy supply needs, with a focus on renewable energy resources, advanced transportation technologies, and environmental products. His previous positions include chief of utility research and demand management, New York State Public Service Commission, where he developed a comprehensive R&D program for electric and gas utilities, and engineering positions at Yankee Atomic Electric Company and Bechtel Corporation. He has a B.S. in physics from SUNY-Albany and an M.S. in engineering management from Northeastern University. Phillip Myers (NAE) is emeritus distinguished research professor and former chairman of the Department of Mechanical Engineering at the University of Wisconsin, Madison, and a fellow of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers. He was the president of the Society of Automotive Engineers in 1969 and has served on numerous National Research Council committees, including the Committee on Fuel Economy of Automobiles and Light Trucks and the Committee on Toxicological and Performance Aspects of Oxygenated Motor Vehicle Fuels. His research interests include internal combustion engines, combustion processes, and

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--> fuels. He has a Ph.D. in mechanical engineering from the University of Wisconsin, Madison. Roberta Nichols (NAE) is retired from Ford Motor Company. From 1979 to 1995, she held several positions at Ford, including manager of the Electric Vehicle (EV) External Strategy and Planning Department, North American Automotive Operations; manager of EV External Affairs, EV Planning and Program Office; manager of the Alternative Fuels Department and the environment and safety engineering staff; and principal research engineer of the Alternative Fuels Department, Scientific Research Laboratory. She was also a member of the technical staff at The Aerospace Corporation from 1960 to 1979, as well as a consultant for the state of California. She is a fellow of the Society of Automotive Engineers, a recipient of the National Achievement Award from the Society of Women Engineers, and a recipient of the Clean Air Award for Advancing Air Pollution Technology from the South Coast Air Quality Management District. Her expertise includes alternative fuel vehicles, EVs, internal combustion engines, and new sources of energy. She has a Ph.D. in engineering and an M.S. in environmental engineering from the University of Southern California and a B.S. in physics from the University of California-Los Angeles. Joan Ogden has been a research scientist at the Center for Energy and Environmental Studies at Princeton University since 1985. Most of her work has involved technical and economic assessments of new energy technologies, including renewable fuels, the use of hydrogen as an energy carrier, and applications of fuel cell technology in transportation. For two years, she was chair of the Solar Fuels and Transportation Division of the American Solar Energy Society. Dr. Ogden has published more then 60 technical articles on energy topics and a book, Solar Hydrogen. She received her Ph.D. in physics from the University of Maryland. Vernon P. Roan is director of the Center for Advanced Studies in Engineering and professor of mechanical engineering at the University of Florida, where he has been a faculty member for nearly 30 years. He was previously a senior design engineer with Pratt and Whitney Aircraft. His research involves spark-ignition engines and diesel engines operating with many alternative fuels, advanced concepts for both types of engines, and fuel-cell powered vehicles. He has served as a consultant to the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, monitoring electric and hybrid vehicle programs, and is now a consultant to Pratt and Whitney on advanced gas turbine engines. Dr. Roan is a member of the NRC Standing Committee to Review the Research Program of the Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles. He has a Ph.D. in engineering from the University of Illinois. Dale Stein (NAE) is president emeritus of MTU (Michigan Technological University) and a retired professor of materials science. He has held positions at MTU, the University of Minnesota, and the General Electric Research Labora-

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--> tory. He is the recipient of the Hardy Gold Medal of the American Institute of Mining, Metallurgical and Petroleum Engineers and the Geisler Award from the American Society of Metals (Eastern New York Chapter) and was an elected fellow of the American Society of Metals and the American Association for the Advancement of Science. He has served on numerous National Research Council committees and has been a member of U.S. Department of Energy's Energy Research Advisory Board. Dr. Stein is an internationally recognized authority on the mechanical properties of engineering materials. He received his Ph.D. in metallurgy from the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. John Wise (NAE) is retired vice president of research, Mobil Research and Development Corporation. He has also been vice president of planning, manager of exploration and production R&D, manager of process and products R&D, director of the Mobil Solar Energy Corporation, and director of the Mobil Foundation. He was on the Board of Directors of the Industrial Research Institute, was active in the World Petroleum Conference, and was co-chair of the Automotive/Oil Industries' Air Quality Improvement Research Program. Dr. Wise's expertise is on fuels, catalysis, R&D management, and the effects of fuels and engines on emissions. He received a Ph.D. in chemistry from MIT.