Appendix

Biographical Sketches of Abel Wolman Distinguished Lecturer and Symposium on Hydrologic Sciences

Abel Wolman Distinguished Lecturer

Thomas Dunne is a professor in the School of Environmental Science and Management and the Department of Geological Sciences and Geography at the University of California, Santa Barbara. He conducts field and theoretical studies of drainage basin, hillslope, and fluvial geomorphology and the application of hydrology and geomorphology to landscape management and hazard analysis. Dr. Dunne obtained a B.A. in geography from Cambridge University in 1964 and a Ph.D. in geography from the Johns Hopkins University in 1969. He conducted research on runoff processes under rainfall and snowmelt while working with the U.S. Department of Agricuture's Agricultural Research Service in Vermont and on hillslope geomorphology while working with the Water Resources Division of the U.S. Geological Survey. Dr. Dunne was elected to the National Academy of Sciences in 1988 for his pioneering work in the fields of geomorphology and hydrology.

Symposium Contributors

Diane M. McKnight is a professor in the Department of Civil, Environmental, and Architectural Engineering at the University of Colorado. She received a B.S. in mechanical engineering, an M.S. in civil engineering, and a Ph.D. in environmental engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Dr. McKnight was a research scientist at the U.S. Geological Survey's, Water Resources Division, where she studied biogeochemical processes in pristine and



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--> Appendix Biographical Sketches of Abel Wolman Distinguished Lecturer and Symposium on Hydrologic Sciences Abel Wolman Distinguished Lecturer Thomas Dunne is a professor in the School of Environmental Science and Management and the Department of Geological Sciences and Geography at the University of California, Santa Barbara. He conducts field and theoretical studies of drainage basin, hillslope, and fluvial geomorphology and the application of hydrology and geomorphology to landscape management and hazard analysis. Dr. Dunne obtained a B.A. in geography from Cambridge University in 1964 and a Ph.D. in geography from the Johns Hopkins University in 1969. He conducted research on runoff processes under rainfall and snowmelt while working with the U.S. Department of Agricuture's Agricultural Research Service in Vermont and on hillslope geomorphology while working with the Water Resources Division of the U.S. Geological Survey. Dr. Dunne was elected to the National Academy of Sciences in 1988 for his pioneering work in the fields of geomorphology and hydrology. Symposium Contributors Diane M. McKnight is a professor in the Department of Civil, Environmental, and Architectural Engineering at the University of Colorado. She received a B.S. in mechanical engineering, an M.S. in civil engineering, and a Ph.D. in environmental engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Dr. McKnight was a research scientist at the U.S. Geological Survey's, Water Resources Division, where she studied biogeochemical processes in pristine and

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--> mine drainage impacted streams and lakes in the Rocky Mountains. She is a principal investigator for the National Science Foundation's Office of Polar Programs project in Antarctica, where she conducts research on Antarctic lakes. Dr. McKnight is the current president of the American Society of Limnology and Oceanography. She was a coeditor of the book The Freshwater Imperative: A Research Agenda (see under references Naiman et al., 1995). Her major research interest is in biogeochemical processes in natural waters. Eric F. Wood is a professor in the Department of Civil Engineering and Operations Research (Environmental Engineering and Water Resources Program) at Princeton University. His research areas include hydroclimatology with an emphasis on land-atmosphere interactions and the representation of those processes across scales, remote sensing, and hydrologic impacts of climate change. Dr. Wood has received the Horton Award from the American Geophysical Union and is a fellow of the American Geophysical Union and the American Meteorological Society. He is also the chairman of the Hydrology Committee of the American Meteorological Society, a member of the remote sensing committee and of the union fellows committee of the American Geophysical Union, and sits on a number of agency program advisory committees. Dr. Wood received an Sc.D. in civil engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1974. Fred M. Phillips is a professor of hydrology at the New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology. He received a B.A. from the University of California, Santa Cruz, in 1976, and an M.S. and a Ph.D. in hydrology from the University of Arizona in 1979 and 1981, respectively. Dr. Phillips' scientific interest is in the area where hydrology, geochemistry, and geology overlap. He received the Clarke Medal from the Geochemical Society in 1988 and was the Birdsall-Dreiss Distinguished Lecturer in Hydrogeology for the Geological Society of America in 1994. He is a member of the American Geophysical Union, the Geological Society of America, the American Quaternary Association, and the Geochemical Society. Stephen J. Burges is professor of civil engineering at the University of Washington, Seattle. He received a B.Sc. in physics and mathematics and a B.E. in civil engineering from the University of Newcastle, Australia, in 1966. He received an M.S. in 1968 and a Ph.D. in 1970 in civil engineering from Stanford University. Dr. Burges' research interests are in surface water hydrology; urban hydrology; water supply engineering; the application of stochastic methods in water resources engineering; water resources systems, design, analysis, and operation; water resources aspects of civil engineering; and ground water hydrology. He is a fellow member of the American Society of Civil Engineers, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and the American Geo-

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--> physical Union. He is the immediate past president of the hydrology section of the American Geophysical Union. Dr. Burges was a member of the Water Science and Technology Board from 1985 to 1989. Symposium Discussants Kaye L. Brubaker is an assistant professor in the Department of Civil Engineering at the University of Maryland. Her work focuses on the strong links between energy and water mass exchanges at the land-atmosphere interface and the implications of these water-energy interactions for regional climate and water resources. She received a B.S. from the University of Maryland in 1989, an S.M. in 1991, and a Ph.D. in 1995 from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Dr. Brubaker is a member of the American Geophysical Union, the American Meteorological Society, the American Society of Civil Engineers, and the Soil and Water Conservation Society. Dara Entekhabi is an associate professor in the Department of Civil Engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He received a B.A. in geography in 1983, an M.A. from the Center for Environment, Technology, and Development in 1984; and an M.A. in geography from Clark University in 1987. Dr. Entekhabi received a Ph.D. in civil engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1990. His research interests are in land-atmosphere interactions, remote sensing, physical hydrology, operational hydrology, hydrometeorology, ground water-surface water interaction, and hillslope hydrology. His professional awards include the National Science Foundation's Presidential Young Investigator (1991–1996), the Massachusetts Institute of Technology's Gilbert Winslow Career Development Chair (1994–1996), the Arturo Parisatti International Prize Competition (1994), and the American Geophysical Union's Macelwane Award (1996). Dr. Entekhabi is a member of the American Meteorological Society and the American Society of Civil Engineers and is a fellow of the American Geophysical Union. David P. Genereux is an assistant professor in the Department of Geology, College of Engineering, Florida International University. He received a B.S. in 1984 from the University of Delaware and an M.S. and a Ph.D. from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1988 and 1991, respectively. Dr. Genereux' s research interests include hydrogeology, especially ground water flow and the interaction of ground water with surface water. He is a member of the American Geophysical Union and the American Society of Civil Engineers. Efi Foufoula-Georgiou is a professor at the St. Anthony Falls Laboratory and the Department of Civil Engineering, University of Minnesota. She received a diploma in 1979 in civil engineering from the National Technical University of

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--> Athens, Greece, and an M.S. and a Ph.D. in environmental engineering in 1982 and 1985, respectively, from the University of Florida. Her major area of interest is hydrology, with an emphasis on understanding and modeling the spatio-temporal organization of hydrologic processes, including precipitation and landforms. Her professional awards include the National Science Foundation's Presidential Young Investigator Award (1989–1994), the National Association of State Universities Commendation for Contributions in Water Resources (1989), and the American Geophysical Union's Excellence in Refereeing (1989). Dr. Foufoula-Georgiou has been an associate editor for Water Resources Research and the Journal of Geophysical Research and was the main organizer of the Fifth International Conference on Precipitation in 1994. She is the author of 35 refereed publications and an Academic Press-edited volume titled Wavelets in Geophysics.