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Biographical Sketches of Workshop Steering Group Members

Gerard W. Elverum, Jr. (chairman) is vice president and general manager (retired) of the Applied Technology Division of TRW Space Defense. Mr. Elverum's expertise is in the areas of research and development of missile, launch vehicle, and spacecraft propulsion systems; high-power directed energy devices; and space-science instruments. His technical interests also include systems engineering and risk assessment and management. He has served on numerous National Research Council (NRC) and NASA committees in space technology and military systems areas. He was a member of NASA 's Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel for many years and a former member of the NRC Commission for Engineering and Technical Systems. He is currently a member of the Space Studies Board. In 1995 he served on the Board's Task Group on Gravity Probe B and is currently a member of NASA's Independent External readiness Review Team for GP-B. Mr. Elverum received the Special Achievement Award of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers in 1971, the Outstanding Engineer Merit Award from the Institute for the Advancement of Engineering in 1972, and the James H. Wyld Propulsion Award of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics in 1973. His professional associations also include Sigma Xi, and he is a fellow of the American Institute for Aeronautics and Astronautics, and a member of the National Academy of Engineering. He received a B.S. degree in physics from the University of Minnesota.

James P. Bagian, a former NASA astronaut, is currently involved in occupational medicine and biomedical research at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Dr. Bagian was a NASA astronaut beginning in 1980 and was active in the planning and provision of emergency medical and rescue support for the first six space shuttle flights. He has written numerous scientific papers in the fields of human factors and environmental and aerospace medicine. He is a veteran of two spaceflights and has logged over 337 hours in space. Dr. Bagian is a member of NRC's



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Report of the Workshop on Biology-based Technology to Enhance Human Well-being and Function in Extended Space Exploration A Biographical Sketches of Workshop Steering Group Members Gerard W. Elverum, Jr. (chairman) is vice president and general manager (retired) of the Applied Technology Division of TRW Space Defense. Mr. Elverum's expertise is in the areas of research and development of missile, launch vehicle, and spacecraft propulsion systems; high-power directed energy devices; and space-science instruments. His technical interests also include systems engineering and risk assessment and management. He has served on numerous National Research Council (NRC) and NASA committees in space technology and military systems areas. He was a member of NASA 's Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel for many years and a former member of the NRC Commission for Engineering and Technical Systems. He is currently a member of the Space Studies Board. In 1995 he served on the Board's Task Group on Gravity Probe B and is currently a member of NASA's Independent External readiness Review Team for GP-B. Mr. Elverum received the Special Achievement Award of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers in 1971, the Outstanding Engineer Merit Award from the Institute for the Advancement of Engineering in 1972, and the James H. Wyld Propulsion Award of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics in 1973. His professional associations also include Sigma Xi, and he is a fellow of the American Institute for Aeronautics and Astronautics, and a member of the National Academy of Engineering. He received a B.S. degree in physics from the University of Minnesota. James P. Bagian, a former NASA astronaut, is currently involved in occupational medicine and biomedical research at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Dr. Bagian was a NASA astronaut beginning in 1980 and was active in the planning and provision of emergency medical and rescue support for the first six space shuttle flights. He has written numerous scientific papers in the fields of human factors and environmental and aerospace medicine. He is a veteran of two spaceflights and has logged over 337 hours in space. Dr. Bagian is a member of NRC's

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Report of the Workshop on Biology-based Technology to Enhance Human Well-being and Function in Extended Space Exploration Space Studies Board, the Committee on Advanced Technology for Human Support in Space, and the Steering Committee for the Workshop on Reducing Space Science Research Mission Cost. Dr. Bagian holds numerous honors and awards, including the NASA Space Flight Award, the NASA Exceptional Service Medal, the Society of NASA Flight Surgeons W. Randolf Lovelace Award, and the American Astronautical Society's Melbourne W. Boynton Award. Dr. Bagian is a member of the Aerospace Medicine Association, the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, the Society of NASA Flight Surgeons, Phi Kappa Phi, Phi Eta Sigma, Pi Tau Sigma, Tau Beta Pi, and Alpha Omega Alpha. Dr. Bagian received a B.S. degree in mechanical engineering from Drexel University and an M.D. degree from Thomas Jefferson University. Rita R. Colwell is president and co-founder of the University of Maryland Biotechnology Institute and a professor of microbiology at the University of Maryland. She is an internationally recognized expert in marine biotechnology, marine and estuarine microbial molecular ecology, microbial systematics, marine microbiology, and temperature and high-pressure effects on marine bacteria. Dr. Colwell serves on numerous government boards and committees and has been appointed to the National Science Board. She has authored or co-authored more than 500 professional publications. Dr. Colwell served on the Polar Research Board and is currently a member of several NRC committees, including the Committee on Opportunities for Advancement of Marine Biotechnology in the United States, the Committee on the Second Forum on Biodiversity, and the Roundtable on Research and Development of Drugs, Biologics, and Medical Devices. She is a former president of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the American Society of Microbiology. She received a B.S. degree (with distinction) and an M.S. degree from Purdue University and a Ph.D. degree from the University of Washington. Dr. Colwell has an honorary D.Sc. from Heriot-Watt University in Edinburgh, Scotland, and is an honorary professor at the University of Queensland in Queensland, Australia. Bruce Dunn is a professor in the Department of Material Sciences at the University of California at Los Angeles. Dr. Dunn is a nationally recognized expert in ceramics engineering and thermodynamics and material properties. Previously he was a staff scientist in the Research and Development Center for the General Electric Company. His research interests include electrical and optical properties of inorganic materials, transport and optical properties of solid electrolytes, synthesis of tunable lasers and other materials by sol-gel methods, and infrared transmitting solids. Dr. Dunn is a member of the American Ceramic Society, the Electrochemical Society, the Material Research Society, and the American Association for the Advancement of Science. Dr. Dunn received a B.S. degree from Rutgers University and a Ph.D. degree from the University of California at Los Angeles. Donald R. Humphrey is a professor of physiology and director of the Neurophysiology Laboratory in the School of Medicine at Emory University. Dr. Humphrey 's specialty is neurophysiology and neuroanatomy. His research interests include cerebral cortical mechanisms in the control of movement and posture and neuromuscular control systems. He is a consultant for the National Institutes of Health. Dr. Humphrey is a recipient of the Hans Berger Research

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Report of the Workshop on Biology-based Technology to Enhance Human Well-being and Function in Extended Space Exploration Award of the American EEG and Clinical Neurophysiological Society. He is a member of the American Physiological Society, the Society for Neuroscience, the Biomedical Engineering Society, and the American Association of Anatomy. Dr. Humphrey received a B.A. degree from San Jose State University and a Ph.D. degree from the University of Washington. Takeo Kanade is director of the Robotics Institute and the U.A. and Helen Whitaker Professor of Computer Science and Robotics at Carnegie Mellon University. Dr. Kanade has made technical contributions in multiple areas of robotics and codeveloped the concept of direct-drive manipulators and the first prototype. Dr. Kanade is a leader and developer of the vision systems for Carnegie Mellon University's NavLab and holds patents for three-dimensional sensors. Previously he was an associate professor in the Department of Information Science, Kyoto University, Japan. Dr. Kanade serves on the NRC's Aeronautics and Space Engineering Board. He has received several awards, including the Joseph Engelberger Award. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering. Dr. Kanade received a Ph.D. degree from Kyoto University. Rodolfo R. Llinas is a professor and chairman of the Department of Physiology and Neuroscience at the New York University Medical Center. Dr. Llinas is an expert in electrical transmission in the mammalian brain. His research interests include neuronal function, synaptic transmission, cerebellar function, thalamocortical function, magnetoencephalography, mathematical modeling, and human brain plasticity. He is the chief editor of Neuroscience and served on the editorial board for the Journal of Neurobiology and the Journal of Theoretical Neurobiology. He is a member of the Scientific Advisory Board, the Roche Institute, and the NASA/Neurolab Science Working Group. Previously, he was a member of the NRC Panel on Basic Neuroscience Research, the Scientific Advisory Board, and the Max-Planck Institute for Psychiatry, and chairman, U.S. National Committee for IBRO. He received the John C. Krantz Award in Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics, University of Maryland, the F.O. Schmitt Lecture and Award in Neuroscience, Rockefeller University, the UNESCO Albert Einstein Gold Medal Award in Science, and the Augustin Nieto Caballero Medal, Colombia. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences. Dr. Llinas received a B.S. degree from Gimnasio Moderno (Bogota), an M.D. degree from the Universidad Javeriana (Bogota), and a Ph.D. degree in neurophysiology from the Australian National University (Canberra). Samuel I. Stupp is the Swanlund Professor of Materials Science and Engineering, Chemistry, and Bioengineering at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Dr. Stupp is an internationally recognized expert on self-assembling materials, biomaterials, and nanocomposites. In 1989, Professor Stupp was appointed to the Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology, and he served from 1991 through 1994 as chairman of the Polymer Division in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering. His major research interests include the synthesis of self-organizing supramolecular materials and inorganic-organic nanocomposites that integrate multiple functions. He is also interested in the design and synthesis of novel biomaterials that could induce the regeneration of human tissues. In 1985, he received the Xerox Award for Excellence in Engineering Research and, in 1991, the Department of Energy Prize for Outstanding Achievement in Materials Chemistry. He was named Joliot

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Report of the Workshop on Biology-based Technology to Enhance Human Well-being and Function in Extended Space Exploration Curie Professor for Fall 1997 at the Ecole Superieure de Physique et de Chimie Industrielles by Pierre-Gilles de Gennes, and he received the Humboldt Research Award to spend time at the Max Planck Institute for Polymer Science. Dr. Stupp has served on the editorial boards of the Journal of Polymer Science–Polymer Chemistry Edition, Acta Polymerica, and Macromolecular Physics and Chemistry. He also served on the Air Force Scientific Advisory Board Materials Panel and is currently the chairman of a National Science Foundation workshop considering future opportunities in macromolecular science and engineering for the next decade. Dr. Stupp received a B.S. degree in chemistry from the University of California at Los Angeles and a Ph.D. degree in materials science and engineering from Northwestern University.