APPENDIX D
Biographical Sketches

EVAN CHARNEY (Chair) is professor and chair emeritus of the Department of Pediatrics at the University of Massachusetts Medical Center and director of the Generalist Physician Faculty Scholars Program supported by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. Previously he was professor of pediatrics at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and pediatrician-in-chief at Sinai Hospital. He has held academic positions at Harvard University and at the School of Medicine and Dentistry at the University of Rochester. A member of the Institute of Medicine since 1989, he was elected in 1996 to its governing council. He is the recipient of awards from the Ambulatory Pediatric Association, including the George Armstrong award and the excellence in education award for programs at Sinai Hospital and the University of Massachusetts. His research and publications deal with pediatrics, medical education, neighborhood health centers, childhood obesity, and childhood lead poisoning. He has a B.S. degree from Cornell University and an M.D. from Albert Einstein College of Medicine.

KATHLEEN GAINOR ANDREOLI is the vice president for nursing affairs and the John L. and Helen Kellogg dean of the College of Nursing at Rush University and professor of nursing at Rush-Presbyterian-St. Luke's Medical Center in Chicago. She



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From Generation to Generation: The Health and Well-Being of Children in Immigrant Families APPENDIX D Biographical Sketches EVAN CHARNEY (Chair) is professor and chair emeritus of the Department of Pediatrics at the University of Massachusetts Medical Center and director of the Generalist Physician Faculty Scholars Program supported by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. Previously he was professor of pediatrics at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and pediatrician-in-chief at Sinai Hospital. He has held academic positions at Harvard University and at the School of Medicine and Dentistry at the University of Rochester. A member of the Institute of Medicine since 1989, he was elected in 1996 to its governing council. He is the recipient of awards from the Ambulatory Pediatric Association, including the George Armstrong award and the excellence in education award for programs at Sinai Hospital and the University of Massachusetts. His research and publications deal with pediatrics, medical education, neighborhood health centers, childhood obesity, and childhood lead poisoning. He has a B.S. degree from Cornell University and an M.D. from Albert Einstein College of Medicine. KATHLEEN GAINOR ANDREOLI is the vice president for nursing affairs and the John L. and Helen Kellogg dean of the College of Nursing at Rush University and professor of nursing at Rush-Presbyterian-St. Luke's Medical Center in Chicago. She

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From Generation to Generation: The Health and Well-Being of Children in Immigrant Families has been on the faculty of several university medical centers including Duke, Georgetown, Alabama, and Rush. Highlights of her career include participation in the development and implementation of the first coronary care unit and educational program at Duke University Medical Center in the 1960s; authorship of a major textbook on coronary care, now in its eighth edition; leadership of one of the early family nurse practitioner programs, at the University of Alabama in Birmingham in the 1970s; creation and implementation of the Office of Academic Affairs at the University of Texas Health Science Center in Houston in the 1980s; and, since 1987, leadership of the College of Nursing at Rush University and the Home Health Service at Rush-Presbyterian-St. Luke's Medical Center. She is a member of the Institute of Medicine and the American Academy of Nursing. She has a B.S.N. from Georgetown University, an M.S.N. from Vanderbilt University, and a D.S.N. from the University of Alabama, Birmingham. E. RICHARD BROWN is founder and director of the Center for Health Policy Research at the University of California, Los Angeles, and professor of public health in the university's School of Public Health. He has served as president of the American Public Health Association and as a senior consultant to the President's Task Force on National Health Care Reform and has testified before numerous committees of Congress and the California legislature. He has written widely on public health issues; his recent research focuses on health insurance coverage, access to health services, and public policy, especially as it affects low-income populations and ethnic and racial minorities. He is a reviewer for numerous scientific and professional journals and was a member of the Institute of Medicine's Committee on the Prevention and Control of Sexually Transmitted Diseases and its Public Health Roundtable. He has M.A. and a Ph.D. degrees in the sociology of education from the University of California, Berkeley. DONALD J. COHEN is director of the Child Study Center and Irving B. Harris professor of child psychiatry, pediatrics, and psychology at the Yale University School of Medicine. His clinical and research activities have focused on the serious neuropsychiatric disorders of childhood, including pervasive developmental

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From Generation to Generation: The Health and Well-Being of Children in Immigrant Families disorders and stereotypic and tic disorders. He has published more than 300 articles, books, and monographs. He is president of the International Association of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Allied Professions and training and supervisory psychoanalyst at Western New England Institute of Psychoanalysis. He is a member of the Institute of Medicine and chairman of the publications committee of the Yale University Press. He has a B.A. from Brandeis University and an M.D. from the Yale University School of Medicine. JANET CURRIE is professor of economics at the University of California, Los Angeles. Previously she taught at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. She has conducted research and written extensively on welfare, the well-being of children, and labor-related issues and has served as coeditor or advisor to several journals. She was the recipient of an Alfred P. Sloan Foundation research fellowship. She has B.A. and M.A. degrees in economics from the University of Toronto and a Ph.D. in economics from Princeton University. KATHERINE DARKE (Research Assistant) is research associate at the Urban Institute. Previously she served as research assistant for the Board on Children, Youth, and Families. She has a B.A. in government and an M.P.P. from the College of William and Mary. DAVID L. FEATHERMAN is director and senior research scientist at the Institute for Social Research and professor of sociology and psychology in the College of Literature, Science and the Arts at the University of Michigan. Prior to 1994, he served as president of the Social Science Research Council in New York. Previously, for 21 years he was on the faculty of the University of Wisconsin, Madison, where he chaired several departments and institutes and was the John Bascom professor in sociology. His research has spanned the multidisciplinary fields of demography, social psychology, human development, and gerontology. He has written or coauthored five books and dozens of published papers about socioeconomic inequality and social mobility in Western industrial nations. In 1990 he received the distinguished career of research award of the American Sociological Association's Sec-

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From Generation to Generation: The Health and Well-Being of Children in Immigrant Families tion on Aging and the Life Course. He is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, a 1978-1979 fellow of the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences, and a former Guggenheim fellow. He has Ph.D. and M.A. degrees from the University of Michigan in sociology and social psychology. MICHAEL FIX is an attorney and principal research associate at the Urban Institute, where he directs the Immigrant Policy Program. He has served as a consultant to the Equal Opportunity Division of the Rockefeller Foundation. The substantive focus of his work has been on immigration and immigrant policy, civil rights, regulatory reform, and federalism. He has coauthored several books and articles on these subjects, including Immigration and Immigrants: Setting the Record Straight (with Jeffrey Passel) and Clear and Convincing Evidence: Testing for Discrimination in America (coeditor with Raymond Struyk). He has a B.A. from Princeton University and a J.D. from the University of Virginia. NANCY GEYELIN (Research Assistant) is research assistant as well as assistant director of communications for the Board on Children, Youth, and Families. Prior to joining the staff of the board, she was a researcher and fundraiser for the Heartland Alliance for Human Needs and Human Rights in Chicago, a research assistant working on a history of the Fels family of Philadelphia, and a legal assistant for an immigration law firm in Philadelphia. She has a B.A. in history from Haverford College. DONALD J. HERNANDEZ (Study Director) is chief of the Marriage and Family Statistics Branch of the U.S. Bureau of the Census. Previously he was a senior research scholar at the Center for Population Research at Georgetown University, a staff associate at the Center for Coordination of Research on Social Indicators of the Social Science Research Council, and an assistant professor in the Department of Sociology at the University of South Carolina. He will join the faculty of the State University of New York at Albany as professor of sociology in fall 1999. He has a Ph.D. in sociology from the University of California, Berkeley.

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From Generation to Generation: The Health and Well-Being of Children in Immigrant Families FERNANDO GUERRA is director of health at the San Antonio Metropolitan Health District and a practicing pediatrician. Previously he was clinical professor in the Department of Pediatrics at the University of Texas Health Science Center. He is a fellow of the American Academy of Pediatrics and a founding scholar of the Public Health Leadership Institute. He is active in a variety of forums on health issues, including improving access to health care for immigrant children and their families, reducing domestic and interpersonal violence, and community-based programs and services for HIV/AIDS efforts. He has a B.A. from the University of Texas, Austin, an M.D. from the University of Texas, Galveston, and an M.P.H. from the Harvard School of Public Health. BILL ONG HING is visiting professor at the King Hall School of Law of the University of California, Davis; he also volunteers as executive director of the Immigrant Legal Resource Center in San Francisco. Previously, he was on the faculty of Stanford Law School and Golden Gate University Law School. He is the author of several books on immigration law, including To Be An American: Cultural Pluralism and the Rhetoric of Assimilation, Handling Immigration Cases, and Making and Remaking Asian America Through Immigration Policy. He has an A.B. in psychology from the University of California, Berkeley, and a J.D. from the University of San Francisco. ARTHUR KLEINMAN is Maude and Lillian Presley professor of medical anthropology, professor of psychiatry, and chairman of the Department of Social Medicine at the Harvard Medical School, as well as professor of social anthropology in the Department of Anthropology, Harvard University. Previously he held faculty positions at the University of Washington. He directed the World Mental Health Report, was a member of the steering committee of the American Psychological Association and National Institute of Mental Health's Taskforce on Culture and Psychiatric Diagnosis, and was cochair of the Committee on Culture, Health and Human Development of the Social Science Research Council. He is the author of more than 150 articles and 5 books and editor or coeditor of 15 volumes. He has A.B. and M.D. degrees from

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From Generation to Generation: The Health and Well-Being of Children in Immigrant Families Stanford University and an M.A. in social anthropology from Harvard University. ALAN M. KRAUT is professor in the Department of History at American University. He is the author of several books on immigration, including Huddled Masses: The Immigrant in American Society, 1880-1921, and the coauthor of American Refugee Policy and European Jewry, 1933-1945 (with R. Breitman). He was awarded the Theodore Saloutos prize by the Immigration History Society and the 1994 Phi Alpha Theta book award by the International Honor Society in History for Silent Travelers: Germs, Genes, and the "Immigrant Menace." As a specialist in both immigration history and the history of medicine, he has published many articles on the health of immigrants and refugees in the United States. He has a B.A. in history from Hunter College and an M.A. and a Ph.D. degrees in American history from Cornell University. NANCY S. LANDALE is professor of sociology at the Pennsylvania State University. Previously she was on the faculty of the Department of Sociology at the University of Chicago. She specializes in the area of family demography, with an emphasis on the demographic behavior of racial and ethnic minority groups. She is currently conducting a study of maternal and infant health among Puerto Ricans, focusing on the effects of migration and acculturation processes on infant health outcomes. She has authored or coauthored numerous articles dealing with immigration. She has M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in sociology from the University of Washington. ANTONIO McDANIEL is associate professor of sociology and chair of the Graduate Group in Demography at the University of Pennsylvania. His research focuses on African and African American population dynamics. He is the author of a book on the colonization of Liberia in the nineteenth century; his recent work has appeared in numerous scholarly journals. He is currently conducting research in Africa and the Americas and completing a book on the demography of race in South Africa, Brazil, and the United States. He has a Ph.D. from the University of Chicago.

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From Generation to Generation: The Health and Well-Being of Children in Immigrant Families FERNANDO S. MENDOZA is chief of the Division of General Pediatrics and associate dean of student affairs at the Stanford University School of Medicine, as well as associate professor of pediatrics at the Lucile Salter Packard Children's Hospital. His research has focused on assessing the health and nutritional status of Hispanic-origin children in the United States. He has published extensively on the nutritional status of Mexican American and mainland Puerto Rican children, identifying the effects of poverty on the growth patterns of these children. He also has examined chronic illness and perceived health status among Hispanic children and the effects of poverty and acculturation on these health parameters. His current work is focused on differentiating the health and nutritional status of Mexican American children by generational status. He has received the Henry J. Kaiser award for outstanding and innovative contributions in medical education from the Stanford University School of Medicine and has been honored for his work with Hispanic children by the Latino Health Affairs Council and COSSMHO. He has a B.A. from San Jose State University, an M.D. from the Stanford University School of Medicine, and an M.P.H. from Harvard University. VICTOR NEE is Goldwin Smith professor of sociology and chair at Cornell University. Previously he was director of the Comparative Societal Analysis Program at Cornell and a member of the faculty of the University of California, Santa Barbara. He was a visiting scholar at the Russell Sage Foundation, as well as a fellow at the Center for Advanced Studies in the Behavioral Sciences. The focus of his research has been on economic sociology, ethnicity and immigration, and political sociology; he has authored or coauthored more than 80 books and articles in these fields. He has a B.A. in history and biology from the University of California, Santa Cruz, and an M.A. in East Asian studies and sociology and a Ph.D. in sociology from Harvard University. MARY L. de LEON SIANTZ is professor in the Department of Family and Child Nursing at the University of Washington School of Nursing. She has also been on the faculties of Indiana University, Georgetown University, the University of Michigan, and the University of California, Los Angeles. Her research has focused

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From Generation to Generation: The Health and Well-Being of Children in Immigrant Families on factors that influence the successful outcomes of migrant preschool children. She is a fellow of the American Academy of Nursing, a member of the National Advisory Council on Nursing Research, and the National Institute of Nursing Research and a founding and executive board member of the National Association of Hispanic Nurses. She is the author or coauthor of numerous publications in the field of the mental health and development of Hispanic children and their families. She has a B.S. in nursing from Mount Saint Mary's College, Los Angeles, an M.N. in child psychiatric nursing from the University of California, Los Angeles, and a Ph.D. in human development from the University of Maryland. DAVID R. SMITH is president of the Texas Tech Health Sciences Center. Previously he was commissioner of the Texas Department of Health, professor in pediatrics at the School of Medicine at Texas Tech, medical director of the Brownsville Community Health Center, and deputy director of the Division of Special Populations and Program Development of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. He is a board-certified pediatrician who currently serves on the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services' National Vaccine Advisory Committee and on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Good Neighbor Environmental Board. He has written more than 100 academic articles, chapters, and opinion pieces. He has an A.B. from Cornell University and an M.D. from the University of Cincinnati. ALEX STEPICK is director of the Immigration and Ethnicity Institute and professor of anthropology and sociology at Florida International University. Previously he was a visiting scholar at the Russell Sage Foundation in New York and a visiting Fulbright professor in Oaxaca, Mexico. His coauthored book, City on the Edge, on how immigration has changed Miami, won the Robert Park award for the best book in urban sociology and the Anthony Leeds Award for the best book in urban anthropology. His most recent book is Pride Against Prejudice: Haitians in the United States. He received the Margaret Mead award from the American Anthropological Association and the Society for Applied Anthropol-

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From Generation to Generation: The Health and Well-Being of Children in Immigrant Families ogy for his work with Haitian refugees. He has a Ph.D. in social sciences from the University of California, Irvine. SYLVIA FERNANDEZ VILLARREAL is clinical professor of pediatrics at the University of California, San Francisco, pediatric inpatient director and director of the Kempe Clinic for teen mothers, high-risk children, and their families, and chief of staff at San Francisco General Hospital. Previously, she was assistant professor of pediatrics at the University of Colorado, Denver. Her current research focuses on Hispanic and African American teenage pregnancy, work on substance abused infants and children, and post-traumatic stress disorder in teenage pregnancy. She has a B.A. in biology and theology from St. Mary's University and an M.D. from the Stanford University School of Medicine.