Appendices



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--> Appendices

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--> Appendix A Biographical Sketches of Committee Members Larry R. Faulkner (chair) is professor of chemistry and president of the University of Texas at Austin. His previous positions include assistant professor at Harvard University, professor of chemistry at the University of Texas at Austin, and professor of chemistry, head of the Department of Chemistry, dean of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, and provost and vice chancellor for academic affairs at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Dr. Faulkner is a former president and vice president of the Electrochemical Society and chair of the Executive Committee of the Electrochemical Society's Physical Electrochemistry Division. He has also served as vice president of the International Society of Electrochemistry and is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. Dr. Faulkner has served on a number of National Research Council committees, including the Committee on Electrochemical Aspects of Energy Conservation and Production, the Air Force Panel on Basic Research, and the Committee on Critical Technologies: The Role of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering in Maintaining and Strengthening American Technology. He received the U.S. Department of Energy Award for Outstanding Scientific Achievement in Materials Chemistry and the American Chemical Society's Award in Analytical Chemistry. His areas of expertise include chemiluminescence, electron transfer mechanisms, assemblage of chemical devices from thin films of molecular materials, molecular organization, photoredox processes in zeolites, and electrochemical instrumentation. He received a B.S. degree from Southern Methodist University and a Ph.D. from the University of Texas at Austin.

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--> Kathryn R. Bullock is development manager, Power Sources, at Medtronic, Inc., where she is responsible for developing lithium batteries and other power sources for implantable medical devices. Before joining Medtronic, she was technical manager, Batteries and Purchased Products, and a member of the Energy Systems Management Team at AT&T Bell Laboratories with responsibility for the development and engineering of batteries, cables, and other electronic products for telecommunications power systems. From 1980 to 1991, Dr. Bullock was manager of the Chemical Research Department of Johnson Controls, Inc., where she supervised the research and development (R&D) of new battery systems, innovative processes and designs for lead-acid batteries, and battery materials. She is a fellow of the Royal Society of Chemistry (London) and of the American Institute of Chemists and has served as president and vice president of the Electrochemical Society. Dr. Bullock received a B.A. degree in English from the University of Colorado and a Ph.D. in physical chemistry from Northwestern University. Paul A. Kohl is professor and institute fellow of the School of Chemical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology. He was formerly a technical supervisor at AT&T Bell Laboratories, where his activities included electrochemical processing, the establishment of a thin film analytical facility, and the development of processes for metal/polymer deposition on silicon multichip modules. Dr. Kohl's current research interests include the electrochemistry of semiconductors, batteries and deposition, and semiconductor processing. He has published more than 60 papers in scientific journals, and his research has resulted in 22 patents in electrochemistry and semiconductor processes. He is editor of the Journal of the Electrochemical Society and was founding editor of The Electrochemical Society Interface. Dr. Kohl received a B.S. from Bethany College and a Ph.D. from the University of Texas at Austin, both in chemistry. Carl A. Kukkonen is director of the Center for Space Microelectronics Technology and manager of the Supercomputing Project at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), California Institute of Technology. He is responsible for the management and technical leadership of programs to develop and demonstrate advanced technology for National Aeronautics and Space Administration and the U.S. Department of Defense and to deliver this technology to industry for commercialization. Before joining JPL, Dr. Kukkonen spent eight years with Ford Motor Company, where he conducted a technological assessment of the potential for using hydrogen as an alternative automotive fuel. He was also project leader of the team that designed, developed, and demonstrated the first direct injection passenger car diesel engine. Dr. Kukkonen received a B.S. degree in physics from the University of California, Davis, and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees, also in physics, from Cornell University.

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--> Alexander MacLachlan (NAE) retired as deputy undersecretary for R&D management at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in 1996. During his two-year tenure at DOE, Dr. MacLachlan was responsible for oversight of partnership activities between the national laboratories and private industry, and he assisted in reengineering the DOE's research management structure. In 1993, Dr. MacLachlan retired as senior vice president for R&D at DuPont after more than 36 years of service. He has served as a director of the Industrial Research Institute and as a member of the Fermi Board of Overseers and is currently a trustee of the Bartol Institute at the University of Delaware and the Mt. Cuba Astronomical Observatory. Dr. MacLachlan is a member of the Secretary of Energy's External Advisory Board and of the Sandia President's Advisory Council. He was elected to the National Academy of Engineering in 1992. He received a B.S. in chemistry from Tufts University and a Ph.D. in physical organic chemistry from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. James A. McIntyre is a research scientist in the Designed Products and Devices Laboratory at Dow Chemical Company's central research and development facility in Midland, Michigan. His areas of expertise include electrochemical techniques for waste stream reduction, fuel cells, electroactive materials, and applications of oxygen electrochemistry to energy reduction. He is a member of the Electrochemical Society and the American Association for the Advancement of Science. Dr. McIntyre received B.Sc. and M.Sc. degrees in chemistry from the University of Manitoba and a Ph.D. in physical chemistry from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. Barry Miller is Frank Hovorka Professor of Chemistry at Case Western Reserve University. His previous positions include member of the technical staff at AT&T Bell Laboratories and instructor of chemistry at Harvard University. Dr. Miller's research interests include interfacial kinetics, electronic materials processing, electrosynthesis (semiconductors, polymers, and superconductors), and the development of new instrumental methods in electrochemistry. He received the Charles N. Reilly Award of the Society for Electroanalytical Chemistry in 1994 and the David C. Grahame Award in Physical Electrochemistry from the Electrochemical Society in 1991. Dr. Miller is president of the Electrochemical Society for 1997–1998 and has served in several other positions in the Electrochemical Society. He is former president of the Society for Electroanalytical Chemistry and former United States national secretary of the International Society for Electrochemistry. Dr. Miller received an A.B. from Princeton University and a Ph.D. degree from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, both in chemistry. David L. Morrison is retired director of the Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. His previous positions include technical director of the Energy, Resource and Environmental Systems Division,

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--> MITRE Corporation; president of the IIT Research Institute; and director of program development and management, Battelle Memorial Institute. He has been a member of the NRC's Energy Engineering and National Materials Advisory Boards, has chaired the NRC Committee on Alternative Energy R&D Strategies, and has served on the NRC Committee on Fuel Economy of Automobiles and Light Trucks. His areas of expertise include research management, energy and environmental research, nuclear chemistry, and physical chemistry. Dr. Morrison has a B.S. degree from Grove City College and a Ph.D. in chemistry from the Carnegie Institute of Technology. Brijesh Vyas is technical manager of the Energy Conversion Technology Group at Bell Laboratories-Lucent Technologies, Murray Hill, New Jersey, where he is responsible for research on advanced materials and technologies for high energy density batteries. He has led efforts to develop rechargeable lithium batteries and use nickel-cadmium and nickel-hydrogen batteries for satellite applications. Dr. Vyas is responsible for technology transfer to manufacturing and the liaison with battery users for alternative energy solutions. He was formerly on the staff at Brookhaven National Laboratory and has been a guest professor at the Technical University of Denmark in Copenhagen. He received the Sam Tour Award from the American Society of Materials and Testing in 1983. His areas of expertise include materials, electrochemistry, and corrosion. Dr. Vyas received a BTech degree in metallurgical engineering from the Indian Institute of Technology in Bombay and a Ph.D. in materials science from the State University of New York, Stony Brook. Robert D. Weaver is retired from the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), where he was manager for more than 15 years of a variety of battery R&D contracts, especially relating to high-energy fused-salt load-leveling systems. Before joining EPRI, he was responsible for general electrochemical and client-supported research, including work on various battery systems, at Stanford Research Institute (SRI) International. Mr. Weaver was a researcher with General Motors Corporation (Delco Remy and Defense Research Laboratories) from 1958 to 1967, where he performed research leading to new battery systems for electric vehicles and space power systems. He was a civilian research chemist at the Michelson Laboratory of the U.S. Naval Ordnance Test Station at China Lake, California, from 1953 to 1958, where he conducted research on electro-organic reactions. Mr. Weaver has many publications and five patents in batteries and fuel cells. Much of his work has been in the field of high-energy batteries using fused salts. He is currently listed as a scientific fellow at SRI International. Mr. Weaver has a B.A. in chemistry and mathematics from Blackburn University and an M.S. in chemistry from Kansas State College.