Appendix D Summary Of The Canadian Network Rationalization Plan1

The Climate Network meets the needs of a broad range of users that depend on Environment Canada to ensure that there are adequate, reliable and comprehensive climate data. This information is extremely important to all sectors of the Canadian economy, and to the safety and security of Canadians.

The rationalization exercise has shown conclusively that much of the existing network is also essential for addressing five key Departmental priorities:

  • understanding climate change and variability
  • understanding atmospheric deposition and climate change impacts on the environment;
  • meeting international and inter-jurisdictional commitments;
  • providing knowledge on the Climates of Canada;
  • and, supporting the weather forecasting mandate.

An evaluation of the spatial coverage and network size required to address the broad needs for climate information under Climates of Canada, concluded that on the order of 3,600 stations are required. The Working Group therefore proposes that station closures be minimized and be limited only to what is essential in order to address the budget reductions under Program Review.

In 1994, there were about 2,750 climate stations in the network. Since then, 250 stations have been closed and another 250 are tentatively scheduled to be discontinued to address the proposed reductions. Further reduction opportunities are extremely limited and must be undertaken with caution so as not to seriously undermine the Department's ability to address these key priorities.

The Climate Network is one of the most cost-effective observing networks in the Department. The data collection is done primarily by volunteers, or through partnerships at a marginal cost. A thorough analysis of the program costs identified that there are few areas where there are opportunities to reduce the delivery costs.

In 1994, the beginning of Program Review, the AEP was expending just under $3,500,000 on its climate monitoring activities. To address the proposed 35 percent reduction in this area requires a reduction of about $1,200,000. Salary reductions, cost savings from station closures to date and termination of contracts have resulted in a cost reduction of $730,000 so far. A number of strategies are proposed for reaching the Program Review target. They include: discontinuing lesser quality stations, further reducing of contracts, and reducing network densities in certain geographical regions.

Reference

Environment Canada. 1996. Climate Network Rationalization. National Weather Services Directorate/Direction generale nationale des services meteorologiques. Ottawa: Atmospheric Environment Service.

1  

This is the Executive Summary of the Climate Network Rationalization. November 1996. Ottawa: Environment Canada, Atmospheric Environment Service. National Weather Services Directorate.



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--> Appendix D Summary Of The Canadian Network Rationalization Plan1 The Climate Network meets the needs of a broad range of users that depend on Environment Canada to ensure that there are adequate, reliable and comprehensive climate data. This information is extremely important to all sectors of the Canadian economy, and to the safety and security of Canadians. The rationalization exercise has shown conclusively that much of the existing network is also essential for addressing five key Departmental priorities: understanding climate change and variability understanding atmospheric deposition and climate change impacts on the environment; meeting international and inter-jurisdictional commitments; providing knowledge on the Climates of Canada; and, supporting the weather forecasting mandate. An evaluation of the spatial coverage and network size required to address the broad needs for climate information under Climates of Canada, concluded that on the order of 3,600 stations are required. The Working Group therefore proposes that station closures be minimized and be limited only to what is essential in order to address the budget reductions under Program Review. In 1994, there were about 2,750 climate stations in the network. Since then, 250 stations have been closed and another 250 are tentatively scheduled to be discontinued to address the proposed reductions. Further reduction opportunities are extremely limited and must be undertaken with caution so as not to seriously undermine the Department's ability to address these key priorities. The Climate Network is one of the most cost-effective observing networks in the Department. The data collection is done primarily by volunteers, or through partnerships at a marginal cost. A thorough analysis of the program costs identified that there are few areas where there are opportunities to reduce the delivery costs. In 1994, the beginning of Program Review, the AEP was expending just under $3,500,000 on its climate monitoring activities. To address the proposed 35 percent reduction in this area requires a reduction of about $1,200,000. Salary reductions, cost savings from station closures to date and termination of contracts have resulted in a cost reduction of $730,000 so far. A number of strategies are proposed for reaching the Program Review target. They include: discontinuing lesser quality stations, further reducing of contracts, and reducing network densities in certain geographical regions. Reference Environment Canada. 1996. Climate Network Rationalization. National Weather Services Directorate/Direction generale nationale des services meteorologiques. Ottawa: Atmospheric Environment Service. 1   This is the Executive Summary of the Climate Network Rationalization. November 1996. Ottawa: Environment Canada, Atmospheric Environment Service. National Weather Services Directorate.