Appendix

The Classroom Assessment in Mathematics (CAM) Network Project (1991–1993) was an extension of the work done by the Urban Mathematics Collaboratives (UIVIC), and was a National Eisenhower Project (R168C10098-92) awarded by the Department of Education to Education Development Center (EDC). CAM piloted new approaches to staff development on the topic of mathematics classroom assessment. An overarching goal was to ground instructional change in teachers' knowledge of student understanding. The project took place in six UMC cities—Dayton, Memphis, Milwaukee, Pittsburgh, San Diego, and San Francisco—and was a collaborative effort among EDC staff, teams of middle-grades teachers in each site, and the six district mathematics supervisors. Over the course of CAM's two years, the teachers and administrators engaged in professional-development experiences aimed at building their capacities to use a variety of approaches to classroom assessment and to make appropriate interpretations of student work.

The Assessment Communities of Teachers (ACT) Project (1994–1997) extended the work of the CAM Network Project. It was a National Science Foundation teacher enhancement project (ESI-9353622) awarded to Pittsburgh Public Schools, with a technical-assistance contract to EDC. In ACT, the six CAM teams became leadership teams designing and implementing professional-development programs that focus on classroom assessment as a vehicle for changing teachers' classroom practice. The project was guided by the belief that professional development is most effective when it is ongoing, responsive to the needs of participants,



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Learning About Assessment, Learning Through Assessment Appendix The Classroom Assessment in Mathematics (CAM) Network Project (1991–1993) was an extension of the work done by the Urban Mathematics Collaboratives (UIVIC), and was a National Eisenhower Project (R168C10098-92) awarded by the Department of Education to Education Development Center (EDC). CAM piloted new approaches to staff development on the topic of mathematics classroom assessment. An overarching goal was to ground instructional change in teachers' knowledge of student understanding. The project took place in six UMC cities—Dayton, Memphis, Milwaukee, Pittsburgh, San Diego, and San Francisco—and was a collaborative effort among EDC staff, teams of middle-grades teachers in each site, and the six district mathematics supervisors. Over the course of CAM's two years, the teachers and administrators engaged in professional-development experiences aimed at building their capacities to use a variety of approaches to classroom assessment and to make appropriate interpretations of student work. The Assessment Communities of Teachers (ACT) Project (1994–1997) extended the work of the CAM Network Project. It was a National Science Foundation teacher enhancement project (ESI-9353622) awarded to Pittsburgh Public Schools, with a technical-assistance contract to EDC. In ACT, the six CAM teams became leadership teams designing and implementing professional-development programs that focus on classroom assessment as a vehicle for changing teachers' classroom practice. The project was guided by the belief that professional development is most effective when it is ongoing, responsive to the needs of participants,

OCR for page 51
Learning About Assessment, Learning Through Assessment content-rich, inquiry-based, and collaborative. EDC provided ACT teams with support in developing the knowledge, leadership skills, and materials to help them plan and implement effective professional-development programs focused on classroom assessment in mathematics. The ACT teams totaled approximately 60 teachers and administrators. Their district work, in turn, reached several hundred middle-grades teachers in the sites. The Leadership for Urban Mathematics Reform (LUMR) Project (1994–1997) was a National Science Foundation teacher enhancement project (ESI-9353449) awarded to EDC, and took place in six UMC sites: Durham, Los Angeles, Milwaukee, St. Louis, San Diego, and Worcester. The project was designed to help the six districts develop the leadership capacities of middle and high school teachers, to develop ways to put that teacher leadership into the service of district mathematics reform, and to provide models of professional development that can support the kinds of teacher learning and capacity building that mathematics reform demands. Professional development in LUMR emphasized the development of algebraic thinking across middle-and high-school grades. In each site, two cohorts of teachers (each cohort an even mix of middle and high school teachers) spent two years apiece meeting monthly in study groups, wherein they worked on mathematics that highlighted algebraic thinking, analyzed student work, and developed leadership plans. Over the term of the project, approximately 200 teachers participated.