Table A-3. By the year 2020, the number of CVD deaths attributable to tobacco use is expected to surpass 2.5 million annually.

A third reason for the emerging epidemic of CVD in developing countries is largely unavoidable: the aging of populations due to declining fertility and the reduction in infant and childhood mortality (see Chapters 1 and 2).

In summary, the emerging epidemic of CVD in low- and middle-income country populations can be attributed to demographic change, rapid adoption of life-styles and habits associated with elevated CVD risk, and lack of current investment in intervention programs directed to the reduction and prevention of CVD risk factors and to the treatment and control of existing cases.

STEP 3: EVALUATE THE ADEQUACY OF THE CURRENT KNOWLEDGE BASE

Although much is known in developed countries about the distribution and influence of major risk factors for CVD, and lessons in prevention and treatment continue to be learned, there is little experience in applying this rich base of knowledge to the populations of low-and middle-income countries. Data on the nature, extent, and trends in disease occurrence and prevalence of major CVD risk factors are lacking for most regions of the developing world.

TABLE A-2 Deaths (thousands) Due to CVD and to Infectious and Parasitic Disease (IPD) in 30- to 69-Year-Olds by Sex and Region-1990

 

Men

Women

Region

CVD

IPD

CVD

IPD

Established market economies

483

42

227

12

Formerly socialist economies

263

20

163

6

India

611

429

481

240

China

576

158

439

89

Other Asian and Pacific Island countries

289

147

226

140

Sub-Saharan Africa

183

215

211

228

Latin American and Caribbean countries

186

62

147

48

Middle Eastern Crescent

285

83

215

85

Worldwide

3,028

1,128

2,201

798

 

SOURCE: Murray and Lopez, 1996.



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