D Committee and Staff Biographies

COMMITTEE BIOGRAPHIES

LEON E. ROSENBERG, M.D., is a Professor in the Department of Molecular Biology and the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs at Princeton University. He formerly served at Bristol-Myers Squibb Company as President of the Pharmaceutical Research Institute and as Senior Vice President of Scientific Affairs. Prior to joining Bristol-Myers Squibb, Dr. Rosenberg was Dean of the Yale University School of Medicine. During his 26-year affiliation with Yale, Dr. Rosenberg worked as a research geneticist, teacher, clinician, and administrator. Dr. Rosenberg received B.A. and M.D. degrees, both summa cum laude, from the University of Wisconsin. He completed his internship and residency training in internal medicine at Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center in New York City. Active in professional societies, Dr. Rosenberg is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the American Association for the Advancement of Science. He is a past president of the American Society of Human Genetics and of the Association of American Physicians. Dr. Rosenberg is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and the Institute of Medicine.

JOHN F. ALDERETE, Ph.D., is Professor of Microbiology at the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio. His undergraduate B.S. degrees in both mathematics and biology were from the New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology at Socorro. Dr. Alderete received a Ph.D. in microbiology from the University of Kansas, Lawrence. He has published close to 100 publications in peer-reviewed journals and is the author of 15 book chapters. Dr. Alderete has been a member of numerous study sections and panels for several of the institutes at the National Institutes of Health, the National Science Foundation, and other government agencies. He is a member of the board of the Intercultural



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--> D Committee and Staff Biographies COMMITTEE BIOGRAPHIES LEON E. ROSENBERG, M.D., is a Professor in the Department of Molecular Biology and the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs at Princeton University. He formerly served at Bristol-Myers Squibb Company as President of the Pharmaceutical Research Institute and as Senior Vice President of Scientific Affairs. Prior to joining Bristol-Myers Squibb, Dr. Rosenberg was Dean of the Yale University School of Medicine. During his 26-year affiliation with Yale, Dr. Rosenberg worked as a research geneticist, teacher, clinician, and administrator. Dr. Rosenberg received B.A. and M.D. degrees, both summa cum laude, from the University of Wisconsin. He completed his internship and residency training in internal medicine at Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center in New York City. Active in professional societies, Dr. Rosenberg is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the American Association for the Advancement of Science. He is a past president of the American Society of Human Genetics and of the Association of American Physicians. Dr. Rosenberg is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and the Institute of Medicine. JOHN F. ALDERETE, Ph.D., is Professor of Microbiology at the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio. His undergraduate B.S. degrees in both mathematics and biology were from the New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology at Socorro. Dr. Alderete received a Ph.D. in microbiology from the University of Kansas, Lawrence. He has published close to 100 publications in peer-reviewed journals and is the author of 15 book chapters. Dr. Alderete has been a member of numerous study sections and panels for several of the institutes at the National Institutes of Health, the National Science Foundation, and other government agencies. He is a member of the board of the Intercultural

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--> Cancer Council. He is often asked to speak to students, parent groups, and organizations across the country on issues involving minorities and higher education and on American workforce issues. These groups and organizations include the President's National Science Board, the National Institutes of Health, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, and, more recently, the President's Office of Science and Technology Policy. Dr. Alderete is the President of the Society for the Advancement of Chicanos and Native Americans in the Sciences, one of the fastest-growing and highest-quality minority science societies in the United States. KENNETH B. CHANCE, D.D.S., is Dean and Professor of Endodontics at the School of Dentistry at Meharry Medical College. Dr. Chance graduated with a bachelor of science degree in biology from Fordham University. He earned a doctor of dental surgery degree from Case Western Reserve University in 1979. Dr. Chance also completed a general dentistry residency at Jamaica Hospital in New York City and holds a certificate in endodontics from the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey (UMDNJ), New Jersey Dental School. Dr. Chance's academic and administrative appointments have included Associate Professor, UMDNJ, New Jersey Dental School; Chief of Endodontics, Kings County Medical Center, Brooklyn, N.Y.; and Director, Health Policy Program of the Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies, Washington, D.C. He is the recipient of several honors and awards. He was a Robert Wood Johnson Health Policy and Pew National Leadership Fellow from 1991 to 1992. Dr. Chance is a fellow of the American and International College of Dentists and the Pierre Fauchard Academy. CARON CHESS, Ph.D., is Director of Rutgers University's Center for Environmental Communication, which conducts research and training to improve communication about environmental issues. Her experience in academia, government, and environmental advocacy underpins her research interests and publications. Dr. Chess has coauthored publications that are used widely by government and industry practitioners. Her current research interests include methods of evaluating public participation and study of the impact of organizational factors on public participation and risk communication. Dr. Chess received a B.A. degree in English from the State University of New York at Buffalo, an M.S. degree in environmental communications from the University of Michigan, and a Ph.D. degree in environmental studies and democratic processes from the State University of New York. Dr. Chess has served on the Committee on Risk Characterization and Board on Radioactive Waste Management of the National Academy of Sciences. She also has been a member of the governing board of the Society for Risk Analysis.

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--> PURNELL CHOPPIN, M.D., is President of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute. Dr. Choppin was Leon Hess Professor of Virology, Vice President for Academic Programs, Dean of Graduate Studies, and Head of the Laboratory of Virology at the Rockefeller University. Before joining The Rockefeller University as a fellow and as a faculty member, he served as an intern and resident in internal medicine at the Washington University School of Medicine and Barnes Hospital in St. Louis and as a medical officer in the Air Force. He received a medical degree from the Louisiana State University School of Medicine. Dr. Choppin is a past chairman of Class IV (medical sciences) and of the Section on Microbiology and Immunology of the National Academy of Sciences. He has served as a member of the Council and Executive Committee of the Institute of Medicine and as a member of the Governing Board of the National Research Council. He received the Selman A. Waksman Award for excellence in microbiology from the National Academy of Sciences. Dr. Choppin is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and the Institute of Medicine. JAMES W. CURRAN, M.D., Ph.D., is Professor of Epidemiology and Dean of the Rollins School of Public Health of Emory University. He serves as Director of the Emory/Atlanta Center for AIDS Research. Dr. Curran graduated from the University of Notre Dame with a bachelor of science degree. He received a medical degree from the University of Michigan and a master of public health degree from the Harvard University School of Public Health. Dr. Curran was a fellow at the Harvard Center for Community Health and Medical Care. Dr. Curran began his career with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, where he held leadership positions in AIDS research and prevention activities until 1995. Dr. Curran is a member of the Institute of Medicine. DAVID M. CUTLER, Ph.D., is Professor of Economics at Harvard University, in the Economics Department, and at the Kennedy School of Government. Dr. Cutler is also a Research Associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research. He received a B.A., summa cum laude, from Harvard College and a Ph.D. in economics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Dr. Cutler's research is concentrated in health economics, including explanations for increasing health costs, the effect of managed care on medical outcomes, and measuring the productivity of the medical sector. Dr. Cutler was recently named Editor of the Journal of Health Economics. During 1993, Dr. Cutler was on leave as Senior Staff Economist at the Council of Economic Advisers and Director of the National Economic Council in the Clinton Administration. Dr. Cutler's primary responsibilities were in helping to design the president's health reform plan. SUE K. DONALDSON, Ph.D., R.N., is Professor and Dean of the School of Nursing and Professor of Physiology, School of Medicine at Johns Hopkins

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--> University. She received B.S.N. and M.S.N. degrees from Wayne State University and a Ph.D. in physiology and biophysics from the University of Washington. Before coming to Johns Hopkins, Dr. Donaldson was Professor of Physiology, School of Medicine, as well as Professor, Cora Meidl Siehl Endowed Research Chair, and Director of the Center for Long-Term Care of the Elderly, School of Nursing, University of Minnesota. Dr. Donaldson is a pioneer in nursing research and is internationally known for her basic science research in cellular skeletal and cardiac muscle physiology. In 1992, Dr. Donaldson was inducted as a fellow in the American Academy of Nursing. Dr. Donaldson is a member of the Institute of Medicine. BARUCH FISCHHOFF, Ph.D., is University Professor of Social and Decision Sciences and of Engineering and Public Policy at Carnegie Mellon University. He holds a B.S. in mathematics from Wayne State University and an M.A. and a Ph.D. in psychology from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. He is a fellow of the American Psychological Association and a recipient of its Early Career Awards for Distinguished Scientific Contribution to Psychology and for Contributions to Psychology in the Public Interest. He is a fellow of the Society for Risk Analysis, as well as recipient of its Distinguished Achievement Award. Dr. Fischhoff's areas of research include risk communication, risk management, adolescent decision making, evaluation of environmental damages, and protective behavior. He serves on the editorial boards of several journals. He is a member of the Institute of Medicine. SID GILMAN, M.D., is the William J. Herdman Professor and Chair of the Department of Neurology at the University of Michigan and Chief of the Neurology Service at the University of Michigan Hospitals. He also serves as Director of the Michigan Alzheimer's Disease Research Center. Dr. Gilman received his undergraduate and medical training at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA). After his internship in internal medicine at the UCLA Hospital, he served as a research associate at the National Institutes of Health for 2 years and then as a resident in neurology at the Harvard Medical School/Boston City Hospital. After serving as a fellow, he became a faculty member at Harvard Medical School. He then moved to the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Columbia University, where he rose through the ranks quickly and became the H. Houston Merritt Professor of Neurology. He assumed his present position in 1977. Dr. Gilman's research involves both basic science and clinical investigations focused upon neurodegenerative diseases, including Parkinson's disease, cerebellar degeneration, and Alzheimer's disease. He currently serves as Chair of the Peripheral and Central Nervous System Drugs Advisory Committee of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Dr. Gilman has received many prestigious awards and honors. He has served as President of the American Neurological

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--> Association and of the Michigan Neurological Association. Dr. Gilman is a member of the Institute of Medicine. ROBERT L. HILL, Ph.D., is the James B. Duke Professor of the Department of Biochemistry at Duke University Medical Center. He has trained more than 100 Ph.D. students and postdoctoral fellows while at Duke University. Dr. Hill has served as President of the American Society of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (ASBMB) and was chair of the Organizing Committee of the Joint Meeting of the 17th International Congress of ASBMB. He has been a consultant to the National Institutes of Health for review of research grants and training grants and has served on the Director's Advisory Committee. Dr. Hill received an A.B., an M.A., and a Ph.D. from the University of Kansas. He is Associate Editor of the Journal of Biological Chemistry. Dr. Hill is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and the Institute of Medicine. RALPH I. HORWITZ, M.D., is Harold H. Hines, Jr., Professor of Medicine and Epidemiology and Chairman of the Department of Internal Medicine at the Yale University School of Medicine and Codirector of the Yale Robert Wood Johnson Clinical Scholars Program. Dr. Horwitz's scientific interests are in clinical research and epidemiology and emphasize especially methodologies for studying the strategies of clinical care. His prior Institute of Medicine committee memberships include the Committee on Persian Gulf Syndrome Comprehensive Clinical Evaluation Program and the Committee on Policies for Allocating Health Sciences Research Funds. Dr. Horwitz is a member of the Institute of Medicine. THOMAS KELLY, M.D., Ph.D., is the Boury Professor and Chairman of the Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. His scientific interests are in the enzymology and regulation of DNA replication in eukaryotic cells. He received B.A., M.D., and Ph.D. degrees from the Johns Hopkins University and was a postdoctoral fellow at Harvard Medical School and the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. He served for 2 years in the U.S. Public Health Service as a Staff Associate at the National Institutes of Health. Dr. Kelly has been a frequent consultant to the National Institutes of Health for review of research grants and was a member of the Panel to Assess the NIH Investment in Gene Therapy. He also serves as a member of the National Cancer Policy Board. Dr. Kelly is a fellow of the American Philosophical Society and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and a member of the National Academy of Sciences. ANNE C. PETERSEN, Ph.D., is Senior Vice President for Programs at the W. K. Kellogg Foundation. Dr. Petersen oversees the development of effective programming strategies, fosters teamwork, and develops and monitors policies,

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--> philosophies, and organization-wide systems for accomplishing the programmatic mission of the foundation. Previously, Dr. Petersen was the Deputy Director of the National Science Foundation. She was the first woman in the agency's 45-year history to serve in that position. She also served as the Vice President for Research and Dean of the Graduate School at the University of Minnesota. Dr. Petersen has authored many books and articles on adolescence, gender, and research methods. Dr. Petersen holds a bachelor's degree in mathematics, a master's degree in statistics, and a doctorate in measurement, evaluation, and statistical analysis, all from the University of Chicago. SUSAN C. SCRIMSHAW, Ph.D., is Dean, School of Public Health, and Professor of Community Health Sciences and Anthropology, University of Illinois-Chicago. She was a Professor of Public Health and Anthropology at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), and Associate Dean for Academic Programs for the School of Public Health of UCLA. She is an anthropologist who is especially tuned to Hispanic and African-American public health issues. Dr. Scrimshaw's research interests are cross-cultural work on health access, health behavior, improving pregnancy outcomes, rapid anthropological assessment, combining qualitative and quantitative methods, Latino culture in the United States and Latin America, women's health, AIDS, and managing cultural diversity. She is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and has received numerous awards for her work, including the 1985 Margaret Mead Award from the Society for Applied Anthropology and the American Anthropological Association. She has served on many National Academy of Sciences and Institute of Medicine panels and committees, most recently, the Board on International Health. Dr. Scrimshaw is a member of the Institute of Medicine. ROGER H. UNGER, M.D., is Professor of Internal Medicine at the Center for Diabetes Research at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center. Dr. Unger has received the Banting Medal of the American Diabetes Association, the Rumbaugh Award of the Juvenile Diabetes Foundation, the Koch Award of the Endocrine Society, the Claude Bernard Medal of the European Associates for the Study of Diabetes, and a Senior Medical Investigatorship of the Veterans Affairs Medical Center in Dallas, Texas. Dr. Unger has been Director of the Center for Diabetes Research since 1986. He is Professor of Internal Medicine and the Touchstone/West Distinguished Chair in Diabetes Research. Dr. Unger is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, as well as a member of the National Academy of Sciences. MYRL WEINBERG, CAE, is President of the National Health Council, an umbrella organization encompassing more than 100 national health-related groups. Previously, Ms. Weinberg served as Vice President for Corporate

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--> Relations and Public Affairs for the American Diabetes Association (ADA) and was in charge of government relations, public relations, and corporate marketing. Prior to that, she served for 5 years as ADA's Vice President for Programs and the group's first Director of Government Relations. Prior to joining ADA, Ms. Weinberg was Director of Program Development for the Joseph P. Kennedy, Jr., Foundation and earlier worked as Assistant Director of Government Relations for ARC (formerly the Association for Retarded Citizens). Ms. Weinberg has a long history of board and committee service, including work with the National Chronic Care Consortium's National Resource Center, the American Medical Association's Ethical FORCE initiative, the American Society of Association Executives' Ethics Committee, the Funding First Program, the Foundation for Accountability, the National Legal Center for the Medically Dependent and Disabled, Inc., and the Accreditation for Services for Mentally Retarded and Other Developmentally Disabled Persons. She holds an M.A. in special education from George Peabody College and a B.A. in psychology from the University of Arkansas. LINDA S. WILSON, Ph.D., is President of Radcliffe College. She served as Vice President for Research at the University of Michigan. A graduate of Sophie Newcomb College, Tulane University, Dr. Wilson earned a Ph.D. in inorganic chemistry at the University of Wisconsin. Dr. Wilson now leads an educational institution devoted to the advancement of society through the advancement of women through education, research, and public policy. She is noted particularly for her efforts to develop cooperative working relationships among universities, government, and industry and for her attention to individual, institutional, and systemic issues in the development of science and engineering personnel. Her publications span the fields of chemistry, science policy, higher education, and women's education. Dr. Wilson is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. Dr. Wilson is a member of the Institute of Medicine. ADAM YARMOLINSKY, LL.B., is the Regent's Professor of Public Policy in the University of Maryland system. He was Provost and Professor in the Graduate Program in Policy Sciences at the University of Maryland Baltimore County campus from 1985 to 1993. He served in the Kennedy, Johnson, and Carter administrations in the White House, the Pentagon, and the Arms Control and Disarmament Agency. Mr. Yarmolinsky is a founding member of the Institute of Medicine. STAFF BIOGRAPHIES ANDREW M. POPE, Ph.D., is the Director of the Health Sciences Policy Program at the Institute of Medicine. With expertise in physiology, toxicology, and epidemiology, his primary interests focus on environmental and occupa-

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--> tional influences on human health. As a research fellow in the Division of Pharmacology and Toxicology at the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Dr. Pope's research focused on the biochemical, neuroendocrine, and reproductive effects of various environmental substances on food-producing animals. During his tenure at the National Academy of Sciences and since 1989 at the Institute of Medicine, Dr. Pope has directed and edited numerous reports on environmental and occupational issues; topics include injury control, disability prevention, biologic markers, neurotoxicology, indoor allergens, and the inclusion of environmental and occupational health content in medical and nursing school curricula. GEOFFREY S. FRENCH is a Research Associate in the Health Sciences Policy Program. He has been with the Institute of Medicine (IOM) for 3 years, having supported the Office of Finance and Administration and the IOM committees that produced the reports Enabling America: Assessing the Role of Rehabilitation Science and Engineering and Halcion: An Independent Assessment of Safety and Efficacy Data. His undergraduate degree is in history and anthropology, and he completed his master's degree in national security studies at Georgetown University. CHARLES H. EVANS, JR., M.D., Ph.D., is the Head of the Health Sciences Section in the Institute of Medicine. Dr. Evans joined the staff of the Institute of Medicine in March 1998. As Head of the new Health Sciences Section, Dr. Evans has management responsibility for all scientific, administrative, and financial affairs of the Health Sciences Section, which includes the Health Sciences Policy Program and the Neuroscience and Behavioral Health Program and their respective boards in the Institute of Medicine. Dr. Evans is a pediatrician and immunologist and holds the rank of Captain (retired) in the U.S. Public Health Service with 27 years of service as a medical scientist at the National Institutes of Health. He received his B.S. (biology) degree from Union College in 1962 and M.D. and Ph.D. (microbiology) degrees from the University of Virginia in 1969. He was an intern and resident in pediatrics at the University of Virginia from 1969 to 1971 and from 1971 to 1998 served as a Medical Officer in the U.S. Public Health Service Commissioned Corps and concurrently from 1976 to 1998 was Chief of the Tumor Biology Section at the National Cancer Institute. An expert in carcinogenesis and the normal immune system defenses to the development of cancer, he is the author of more than 250 scientific publications. He and his laboratory colleagues discovered the cytokine leukoregulin in 1983 and were awarded three U.S. patents. Dr. Evans has been active as an adviser to community medicine and higher education through his service on the Board of Trustees of Suburban Hospital Health System (1988 to present) and on the Arts and Sciences Alumni Council at the University of Virginia (1987 to 1997). He is the recipient of numerous scientific awards including the Outstand-

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--> ing Service Medal from the U.S. Public Health Service and the Wellcome Medal and Prize. Dr. Evans has been a member of the editorial boards of several scientific journals, has served on a variety of scientific advisory committees, and is a Fellow of the American Institute of Chemists and a credentialed Fellow in Health Systems Administration of the American Academy of Medical Administrators. ROBERT M. COOK-DEEGAN, M.D., directs the National Cancer Policy Board of the Institute of Medicine (IOM) and Commission on Life Sciences, National Academy of Sciences. He previously worked as staff for the report Allocating Federal Funds for Science and Technology (the Press Report) for the National Academy of Sciences and directed an IOM division (now Neuroscience and Behavioral Health Program). He was acting executive director of the congressional Biomedical Ethics Advisory Committee in 1989 following 6 years at the Office of Technology Assessment. He is the author of The Gene Wars: Science, Politics, and the Human Genome. He chairs the Royalty Fund Advisory Committee for the Alzheimer's Association, was a founding member of the Dana Alliance for Brain Initiatives, and is retiring chair of Section X (Social Impacts of Science and Engineering) for the American Association for the Advancement of Science. KATHI E. HANNA, Ph.D., is a science and health policy consultant specializing in biomedical research policy, specifically, genetics, cancer, and reproductive technologies. Most recently, Dr. Hanna served as Senior Advisor to the National Bioethics Advisory Commission in its response to the president's request for recommendations regarding human cloning. Prior to that she was Senior Advisor to the President's Advisory Committee on Gulf War Veterans Illnesses, in which she assessed the effects of military service on the reproductive health of veterans. Dr. Hanna was a senior analyst at the congressional Office of Technology Assessment for 7 years and contributed to numerous science policy studies requested by committees of the U.S. Congress on biotechnology, human genetics, women's health, reproductive technologies, and bioethics. In 1989, Dr. Hanna spent a year at the Institute of Medicine where she edited a book about the interface between biomedical research and politics. In the past decade, Dr. Hanna has also served as a consultant to the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, the National Institutes of Health, the Institute of Medicine, the Federation of American Societies of Experimental Biology, and several academic health centers. Prior to her work in Washington, D.C., Dr. Hanna was the Genetics Coordinator at Children's Memorial Hospital in Chicago. Dr. Hanna received an A.B. in biology from Lafayette College, an M.S. in human genetics from Sarah Lawrence College, and a doctorate from the School of Business and Public Management, George Washington University.

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--> MICHAEL McGEARY is a political scientist who directed the staff work for a dozen reports by committees of the Institute of Medicine (IOM) and other units of the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) between 1981 and 1995, including reports on the cancer centers program of the National Cancer Institute and the AIDS research program of the National Institutes of Health. He did his graduate work at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and, prior to going to NAS, taught at Wellesley College and worked at the National Academy of Public Administration. Currently, he is a consultant on federal science and technology policy, funding, and organization and is coauthoring a book on U.S. science and technology policy. He has served as a consultant to IOM, the National Research Council (Office of Scientific and Engineering Personnel), NAS (Committee on Science, Engineering, and Public Policy), the Association of American Universities, SRI International, Alzheimer's Association, and Washington Advisory Group.