PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL ACADEMY OF SCIENCES OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Table of Contents

Papers from a National Academy of Sciences Colloquium on Protecting Our Food Supply: The Value of Plant Genome Initiatives

 

 

Plant genomics and our food supply: An introduction
Ronald L.Phillips and Michael Freeling

 

1969–1970

 

 

Comparative genetics in the grasses
Michael D.Gale and Katrien M.Devos

 

1971–1974

 

 

Grass genomes
Jeffrey L.Bennetzen. Phillip SanMiguel. Mingsheng Chen. Alexander Tikhonov, Michael Francki. and Zoya Avramova

 

1975–1978

 

 

Down-regulation of RFL, the FLO/LFY homolog of rice, accompanied with panicle branch initiation
Junko Kyozuka, Saeko Konishi, Keisuke Nemoto, Takeshi Izawa, and Ko Shimamoto

 

1979–1982

 

 

Toward a plant genomics initiative: Thoughts on the value of cross-species and cross-genera comparisons in the grasses
Susan McCouch

 

1983–1985

 

 

Plant genomics: More than food for thought
Steven P.Briggs

 

1986–1988

 

 

Assisting developing countries toward food self-reliance
Robert W.Herdt

 

1989–1992

 

 

Toward a successful multinational crop plant genome initiative
R.James Cook

 

1993–1995

 

 

Quantitative trait loci and metabolic pathways
M.D.McMullen, P.F.Byrne, M.E.Snook, B.R.Wiseman, E.A.Lee, N.W.Widstrom, and E.H.Coe

 

1996–2000

 

 

Genome projects and gene pools: New germplasm for plant breeding?
Michael Lee

 

2001–2004

 

 

Relationships of cereal crops and other grasses
Elizabeth A.Kellogg

 

2005–2010

 

 

Plant genome values: How much do we know?
Michael D.Bennett

 

2011–2016

 

 

Importance of anchor genomes for any plant genome project
Joachim Messing and Victor Llaca

 

2017–2020

 

 

Functional genomics: Probing plant gene function and expression with transposons
Robert A.Martienssen

 

2021–2026

 

 

The rice genome project in Japan
Takuji Sasaki

 

2027–2028

 

 

Potentials of the National Corn Genome Initiative
E.H.Coe

 

2029–2032



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Colloquium on Protecting our Food Supply: The Value of Plant Genome Initiatives PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL ACADEMY OF SCIENCES OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA Table of Contents Papers from a National Academy of Sciences Colloquium on Protecting Our Food Supply: The Value of Plant Genome Initiatives     Plant genomics and our food supply: An introduction Ronald L.Phillips and Michael Freeling   1969–1970     Comparative genetics in the grasses Michael D.Gale and Katrien M.Devos   1971–1974     Grass genomes Jeffrey L.Bennetzen. Phillip SanMiguel. Mingsheng Chen. Alexander Tikhonov, Michael Francki. and Zoya Avramova   1975–1978     Down-regulation of RFL, the FLO/LFY homolog of rice, accompanied with panicle branch initiation Junko Kyozuka, Saeko Konishi, Keisuke Nemoto, Takeshi Izawa, and Ko Shimamoto   1979–1982     Toward a plant genomics initiative: Thoughts on the value of cross-species and cross-genera comparisons in the grasses Susan McCouch   1983–1985     Plant genomics: More than food for thought Steven P.Briggs   1986–1988     Assisting developing countries toward food self-reliance Robert W.Herdt   1989–1992     Toward a successful multinational crop plant genome initiative R.James Cook   1993–1995     Quantitative trait loci and metabolic pathways M.D.McMullen, P.F.Byrne, M.E.Snook, B.R.Wiseman, E.A.Lee, N.W.Widstrom, and E.H.Coe   1996–2000     Genome projects and gene pools: New germplasm for plant breeding? Michael Lee   2001–2004     Relationships of cereal crops and other grasses Elizabeth A.Kellogg   2005–2010     Plant genome values: How much do we know? Michael D.Bennett   2011–2016     Importance of anchor genomes for any plant genome project Joachim Messing and Victor Llaca   2017–2020     Functional genomics: Probing plant gene function and expression with transposons Robert A.Martienssen   2021–2026     The rice genome project in Japan Takuji Sasaki   2027–2028     Potentials of the National Corn Genome Initiative E.H.Coe   2029–2032

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Colloquium on Protecting our Food Supply: The Value of Plant Genome Initiatives PROGRAM Protecting Our Food Supply: The Value of Plant Genome Initiatives June 2 Opening Events—Introductory Session Organizers’ opening remarks Mike Gale and Jeff Bennetzen. Report from the 1995 Banbury Meeting: Conclusions from IGGI (International Grasses Genome Initiative) June 3 Genome Projects Mike Gale: “Comparative genomics of the world’s major cereal crops” Stephen O’Brien: “Evolution of genome organization in mammals” Gerry Rubin: “The Drosophila genome project” David Cox: “Understanding disease through whole genome analysis: a paradigm for humans and plants?” Chris Somerville: “The Arabidopsis genome project: a useful model?” Comparative Mapping—Committed short talks Jeff Bennetzen: “Grass genomes” Junko Kyozuka: “Switching genes between one species and another” Susan McCouch: “Thoughts on facilitating exchange of genetic tools and information between species” Keynote Address, Steve Briggs: “Genetics, biotechnology, and sustainable agriculture, especially in regard to plant pathogens” June 4 Plants, Food and Agriculture Bruce Alberts: “Sustainable agriculture: some opportunities and challenges” Robert Herdt: “Agriculture and our changing world population and environment” James Cook: “Achieving a successful, multinational, collaborative grasses genome project” Mike McMullen: “Quantitative trait loci and metabolic pathways: genetic control of flavone synthesis and corn earworm resistance in maize” Mike Lee: “Genome projects and gene pools: new germplasm for plant breeding” Toby Kellogg: “Interesting relationships of crop plants” Mike Bennett: “Plant genome values: how much do we know?” Nuts and bolts of plant/food genome projects, discussion and short talks. Tim Helentjaris: “Obtaining ESTs for rare and specific messages” Jo Messing: “The importance of anchor genomes for any plant genome project” Rob Martienssen: “Probing plant gene function and expression with transposons” Takuji Sasaki: “The rice genome project in Japan” Jim Peacock: “Does biotechnical crop improvement really matter?” Ed Coe: “The maize genome project” Optional discussion from the viewpoint of science administrators, science funding agents, and science policy analysts June 5 Discussion and attempts at summation The organizers have provided a loose structure as an attempt to facilitate thoughtful discussion. Those uncomfortable with or skeptical of groups may, of course, do whatever they like without being disrespectful. As will be seen, even a definition of a genome project involving food is controversial. Virginia Walbot, Organization of the discussion. Introduction to the questions being considered by one or more smaller groups. Retire to conference rooms or areas for continuation of small group discussions. Whole group discussion led by Virginia Walbot. Summation. Parting words from the organizers, reports you might expect, and safe traveling