APPENDIX B Biographical Sketches of Committee Members

James G. O'Connor (chair) is a former president of Pratt & Whitney, which designs and builds engines for commercial, military, and general aviation aircraft. His 34-year career started in engineering and included key assignments in engineering, customer support, program management, manufacturing operations, and general management. He was involved in both military and commercial programs and businesses. His engineering assignments included development and certification of key commercial engines for Boeing and Douglas aircraft companies. In 1989, Mr. O'Connor became the chief executive for Pratt & Whitney, directing all of the aircraft engine manufacturer's $7 billion operations. He retired from Pratt & Whitney in 1993. Mr. O'Connor is currently chairman of the Board of Trustees of Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering, the National Research Council Aeronautics and Space Engineering Board, the Connecticut Academy of Science and Engineering, the President's Advisory Council at Clemson University, and the Wings Club. Mr. O'Connor earned B.S. and M.S. degrees in mechanical engineering from Clemson University and Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, respectively. He also completed the Executive Management Development Program at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute.

M. Craig Beard retired from the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) in March 1996, after receiving the FAA's Distinguished Service Award for 33 years of government and military service. After joining the FAA as an aeronautical engineer, Mr. Beard held positions in the aircraft certification regulatory program at progressive levels of responsibility in Fort Worth, Texas; Brussels, Belgium; Los Angeles, California; and Washington, D.C. His service included 14 years as director of the Aircraft Certification Service and the preceding Office of Airworthiness. Just prior to leaving the FAA, Mr. Beard served nearly three years as director of the FAA's Asia Pacific Office, headquartered in Singapore. Throughout his FAA career, Mr. Beard worked extensively with the aviation safety authorities of many countries, including the European Joint Aviation Authorities and the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO); civil aircraft and aeronautical products manufacturers; and aviation associations in Western and Eastern Europe, the Middle East, South America, and Asia to promote aviation safety. Before joining the FAA, Mr. Beard worked as a designer and aeronautical engineer in industry and as a private consultant engineer for 10 years. He graduated from the University of Wichita (now Wichita State University), Wichita, Kansas, with a B.S. degree in aeronautical engineering in 1962; he has been a professional engineer, registered in the State of Texas, since 1965. He is a fellow of the Royal Aeronautical Society and served on the Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) Aerospace Council. Mr. Beard has received the SAE's Franklin W. Kolk Air Transportation Progress Award (1990), the Flight Safety Foundation/Aviation Week and Space Technology Distinguished Service Award (1992), and was recognized by Aviation Week and Space Technology in its 1993 "Laurels." Mr. Beard is president of the International Federation of Airworthiness, a not-for-profit organization chartered in the United Kingdom and dedicated to improving aviation safety in all aspects of airworthiness, particularly continued airworthiness.

Eugene E. Covert was appointed the T. Wilson Professor Emeritus, Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), following his retirement in 1996. In addition to his academic activities, Professor Covert was associate director of the MIT Aerophysics Laboratory until he became the director of the Gas Turbine Laboratory and department head from 1985 to 1990. His research, which was conducted through the Center of Aerodynamic Studies, has been focused on problems in unsteady fluid mechanics. Professor Covert has been both a member and chair of the U.S. Air Force Scientific Advisory Board, a member of the Aeronautics and Space Engineering Board of the National Research Council, and the 1997



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Improving the Continued Airworthiness of Civil Aircraft: A Strategy for the FAA's Aircraft Certification Service APPENDIX B Biographical Sketches of Committee Members James G. O'Connor (chair) is a former president of Pratt & Whitney, which designs and builds engines for commercial, military, and general aviation aircraft. His 34-year career started in engineering and included key assignments in engineering, customer support, program management, manufacturing operations, and general management. He was involved in both military and commercial programs and businesses. His engineering assignments included development and certification of key commercial engines for Boeing and Douglas aircraft companies. In 1989, Mr. O'Connor became the chief executive for Pratt & Whitney, directing all of the aircraft engine manufacturer's $7 billion operations. He retired from Pratt & Whitney in 1993. Mr. O'Connor is currently chairman of the Board of Trustees of Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering, the National Research Council Aeronautics and Space Engineering Board, the Connecticut Academy of Science and Engineering, the President's Advisory Council at Clemson University, and the Wings Club. Mr. O'Connor earned B.S. and M.S. degrees in mechanical engineering from Clemson University and Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, respectively. He also completed the Executive Management Development Program at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. M. Craig Beard retired from the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) in March 1996, after receiving the FAA's Distinguished Service Award for 33 years of government and military service. After joining the FAA as an aeronautical engineer, Mr. Beard held positions in the aircraft certification regulatory program at progressive levels of responsibility in Fort Worth, Texas; Brussels, Belgium; Los Angeles, California; and Washington, D.C. His service included 14 years as director of the Aircraft Certification Service and the preceding Office of Airworthiness. Just prior to leaving the FAA, Mr. Beard served nearly three years as director of the FAA's Asia Pacific Office, headquartered in Singapore. Throughout his FAA career, Mr. Beard worked extensively with the aviation safety authorities of many countries, including the European Joint Aviation Authorities and the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO); civil aircraft and aeronautical products manufacturers; and aviation associations in Western and Eastern Europe, the Middle East, South America, and Asia to promote aviation safety. Before joining the FAA, Mr. Beard worked as a designer and aeronautical engineer in industry and as a private consultant engineer for 10 years. He graduated from the University of Wichita (now Wichita State University), Wichita, Kansas, with a B.S. degree in aeronautical engineering in 1962; he has been a professional engineer, registered in the State of Texas, since 1965. He is a fellow of the Royal Aeronautical Society and served on the Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) Aerospace Council. Mr. Beard has received the SAE's Franklin W. Kolk Air Transportation Progress Award (1990), the Flight Safety Foundation/Aviation Week and Space Technology Distinguished Service Award (1992), and was recognized by Aviation Week and Space Technology in its 1993 "Laurels." Mr. Beard is president of the International Federation of Airworthiness, a not-for-profit organization chartered in the United Kingdom and dedicated to improving aviation safety in all aspects of airworthiness, particularly continued airworthiness. Eugene E. Covert was appointed the T. Wilson Professor Emeritus, Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), following his retirement in 1996. In addition to his academic activities, Professor Covert was associate director of the MIT Aerophysics Laboratory until he became the director of the Gas Turbine Laboratory and department head from 1985 to 1990. His research, which was conducted through the Center of Aerodynamic Studies, has been focused on problems in unsteady fluid mechanics. Professor Covert has been both a member and chair of the U.S. Air Force Scientific Advisory Board, a member of the Aeronautics and Space Engineering Board of the National Research Council, and the 1997

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Improving the Continued Airworthiness of Civil Aircraft: A Strategy for the FAA's Aircraft Certification Service Wright Brothers Lecturer. He is a member of the New York Academy of Science, the National Academy of Engineering, a fellow of the Royal Aeronautical Society, and an honorary fellow of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics. He holds B.S. and M.S. degrees in aeronautical engineering from the University of Minnesota and an Sc.D. from MIT. Theodore E. Dumont retired after 30 years with Sikorsky Aircraft, where he was the liaison with all civil airworthiness authorities, particularly in the area of aircraft certification, and participated in the certification of the Sikorsky models S-58, S-62, S-61, S-58T, S-64, and S-76 helicopters. Prior to that time, he served for seven years as a design evaluation engineer for the U.S. Civil Aeronautics Administration (which later became the FAA), specializing in rotorcraft structures, rotor drive systems, and power-plant installations. He also served in the U.S. Air Force as the officer in charge of the Air Force facilities at Sikorsky Aircraft and Bridgeport Lycoming, which oversaw production and development contracts. Mr. Dumont has a B.S. degree in aeronautical engineering from the University of Cincinnati and received his private pilot certificate in 1940. He is currently a special advisor to the Board of Directors of the Helicopter Association International. He has received awards from both the FAA and the Helicopter Association International for his distinguished service in the cause of rotorcraft safety and for his contributions to U.S. leadership in the helicopter field. Frank C. Fickeisen was employed by The Boeing Company for more than 40 years. He was associated with the design, test, analysis, and certification of primary and automatic flight controls on Boeing 707, 727, 747, and 767 airplanes. From 1982 to 1993, he coordinated technical work, analyses, and certification programs that led to the certification of Boeing twin-engine airplanes for extended range operations (ETOPS). He was also the Boeing technical focal point for harmonization of ETOPS regulations and many airplane system regulations between the United States and Europe. Mr. Fickeisen was a technical fellow of The Boeing Company and is currently consultant to Boeing, the Soloy Corporation, the Flight Safety Foundation, and the International Federation of Airworthiness. Clyde Kizer is president and chief operating officer of Air-bus Service Company (ASCO), the customer support subsidiary of Airbus Industrie of North America, a position he has held since December 1992. Mr. Kizer joined ASCO in January 1992 as senior vice president for product support. The Airbus Training Center in Miami, the Airbus Spares Center in Ashburn, Virginia, and customer staff support staff report to Mr. Kizer. Prior to joining Airbus, Mr. Kizer was senior vice president for airline and flight operations with Midway Airlines. From 1988 through 1990, he was vice president for engineering and maintenance with the Air Transport Association of America. He was employed by United Airlines for more than 14 years, serving as flight test captain, director of engineering, and vice president for technical services. Mr. Kizer retired from the U.S. Navy as a captain in 1982. During his naval career, he accrued more than 8,000 flight hours in combat and noncombat service. He is a graduate of the U.S. Naval Test Pilot School and a member of the Society of Experimental Test Pilots. He is a member of the SAE and the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics. He has a B.S. degree in chemistry from Eastern Michigan University and has completed the Executive Management Program at Stanford University. Dean J. Lennard retired after a 39-year career with the General Electric Company, 38 of which were in the aircraft engine business. His experience includes engineering management from initial development, certification, product engineering in support of customers' field operations, to overall project management for engines for the C5, B1, B2, F16, and ATF military aircraft and engines and nacelle systems for the B747/B767, DC10/MD11, and A300/A310/A330 commercial aircraft. During his last eight years with General Electric, Mr. Lennard was general manager of the CF6 engine family product lines, which power the commercial aircraft listed above. He holds a B.M.E. degree from the Georgia Institute of Technology and completed the General Electric Executive Development Course. He is a registered professional engineer, holds three patents, has authored various technical papers, and is a retired member of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics. Mr. Lennard was recently inducted into the GE Aircraft Engines Propulsion Hall of Fame. Steven R. Lund is the senior principal staff engineer of flight safety investigations in flight operations for the Douglas Products Division of the Boeing Commercial Airplane Group in Long Beach, California. He has spent 34 years in the U.S. aerospace industry, the last 29 of which have been at the Douglas Aircraft Company (now Boeing). His entire career at Douglas has been devoted to flight test, flight safety, and commercial jet transport incident and accident investigation. He has been involved in the investigation/analysis of more than 180 jet transport airline accidents and more than 5,000 incidents. Mr. Lund has authored several papers on aviation safety and has prepared and taught numerous courses on airline accident investigation and flight safety. He is a past president of the International Society of Air Safety Investigators, Los Angeles Regional Chapter, and past chair of the International Coordinating Council of Aerospace Industries Associations for airline accident investigations. Mr. Lund has a B.S. in aeronautical engineering with a minor in advanced engineering mathematics from California State University, San Luis Obispo. C. Julian May is president and chief operating officer of Tech/Ops International. He retired after 37 years with Delta

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Improving the Continued Airworthiness of Civil Aircraft: A Strategy for the FAA's Aircraft Certification Service Air Lines, where his positions included senior vice president for technical operations, vice president for engineering, and vice president for technical operations planning and development. He has had responsibility for all technical activities at Delta, including engineering, new aircraft evaluation, quality control, maintenance, material services, facilities, and communications. He has been active in the Air Transport Association of America (ATA) as a member of the ATA Airworthiness Assurance Steering Committee, as the chairman of the Engineering, Maintenance and Material Council for 1989 and 1993, and as a member of the ATA Functions Review Team. Mr. May is a member of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics and a fellow of the SAE. He was appointed to the SAE Aerospace Council in 1980 and served as chairman for five years. He was a member of the SAE Board of Directors (1986 to 1989), is currently chairman of the newly formed SAE Engineering Leadership Award Committee, and is a member of the SAE Aerospace Program Office. Mr. May is on the Board of Directors of Cobb Family Resources, an honorary director for the Georgia Engineering Foundation, and a past member of the Aeronautics and Space Engineering Board. Mr. May was the first recipient of the SAE's Marvin Whitlock Award, a recipient of the ATA's Nuts and Bolts Award, and was awarded the 1994 SAE Colwell Medal. In 1992, he presented the William A. Littlewood Lecture at SAE Aerotech. Mr. May graduated from the Virginia Military Institute with a B.S. in engineering and received an M.B.A. in finance from Georgia State University. William H. Schultz has been a professional engineer for 36 years and is currently the vice president for engineering and maintenance of the General Aviation Manufacturers Association in Washington, D.C. He was the 1993-1994 chairman of the FAA's Aviation Rulemaking Advisory Committee (ARAC). In 1994, he served as the industry representative on the FAA's team for the redesign of the Aircraft Certification Service, the product of which was incorporated into the 1996 report, "Challenge 2000 Recommendations for Future Aviation Safety Regulation." In 1995, he was the first chairman of the U.S. Industry Coalition for Harmonization and is still an active member of this committee. He is also the chairman of the ARAC Working Group for Certification Procedures for Products and Parts (FAR 21). Mr. Schultz has led several design review teams for the revalidation or redesign of products to resolve safety issues. He holds an M.S. in aeronautical engineering from Wichita State University, an M.S. in mechanical engineering from Michigan State University, and has completed the Raytheon Advanced Management Training Course. Nozer D. Singpurwalla, professor of operations research, professor of statistics, and distinguished research professor of the Department of Operations Research at the George Washington University, is the director of the George Washington University's Institute for Reliability and Risk Analysis. Professor Singpurwalla is a fellow of the American Statistical Association, the Institute of Mathematical Statistics, and the American Association for the Advancement of Science. He has been a visiting professor at Stanford University; Carnegie Mellon University; the University of California, Berkeley; and the Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University. He has authored or coauthored more than 150 publications (see http://www.seas.gwu.edu/seas/institutes/irra/) on reliability theory, statistical inference, quality control, and risk analysis. For his contributions to the scientific literature, he was awarded the Wilk's Award by the U.S. Army Research Office, a senior fellowship at the National Institute for Standards and Technology, and the Rockefeller Foundation's Scholar in Residence Fellowship. Colin Torkington is currently an air navigation commissioner for ICAO (International Civil Aviation Organization) and the alternate member for Australia on the ICAO Council, which is based in Montreal. He started his career in 1952 with Vickers-Armstrongs, Ltd., in the United Kingdom, working on Viscount, Valiant, and TSR-2 aircraft. His final position was as a senior stressman in the design office. He obtained an M.S. degree in aeronautical engineering from Cranfield University and held a private pilot's license and glider qualification. In Australia, he joined the Department of Civil Aviation as an airworthiness engineer specializing in aircraft structures. He worked on several major accident investigations and during his career undertook 54 overseas assessments and certification visits covering authorities, manufacturers, and operators in 26 countries. He has been head of Airworthiness and Operations in the Australian Civil Aviation Authority in Canberra and chairman of the ICAO Continuing Airworthiness Panel. He is a fellow of the Royal Aeronautical Society. William Hoover, Aeronautics and Space Engineering Board liaison to the Committee on Aircraft Certification Safety Management, is the former executive vice president of the ATA and a retired major general from the U.S. Air Force. At the ATA he was responsible for all aspects of the association's activities, including development and implementation of wide-ranging airline policies. While on active duty, Maj Gen Hoover spent four years in the U.S. Air Force space program, was a combat air wing commander in Vietnam, and later served five years as deputy assistant secretary for military applications in the Department of Energy. He holds a B.S. in engineering from the U.S. Naval Academy and an M.S. in aeronautical engineering from the Air Force Institute of Technology.