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APPENDIX

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APPENDIX A Biographical Sketches of Committee Members jack E. Burlington, chair, was elected to the National Academy of Engineering in 1996. RADM Buffington (CEC U.S. Navy, retired) currently heads the Mack- Blackwell National Rural Transportation Study Center at the University of Ar- kansas Department of Civil Engineering, where he is responsible for directing studies by professors and students to improve life in rural America through im- provements in transportation systems. Admiral Buffington served for 34 years with the Naval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC), rising to com- mander and chief of civil engineers. He led a team of 22,000 NAVFAC employ- ees, with an annual workload of $7 billion, to provide engineering and contract- ing support for environmental, design, construction, and public works operations worldwide. His previous positions with NAVFAC included commander of the Pacific Division, commanding officer of the Navy Public Works Center in Nor- folk, Virginia, officer in charge of construction of the $200 million Bethesda Naval Medical Center complex, and commander of both the Atlantic and Pacific Seabees. Admiral Buffington is the past national president of the Society of American Military Engineers and was elected to the Board of Directors of the National Institute of Building Sciences in 1996. He holds B.S. and M.S. degrees in civil engineering from the University of Arkansas and the Georgia Institute of Technology, respectively. Albert F. Appleton is a senior fellow with the Regional Plan Association (RPA), the oldest regional planning organization in the United States. Mr. Appleton has developed regional infrastructure and environmental financing strategies and pro- grams for RPA's new Third Regional Plan, which is built around integrating engineering and environmental expertise and linking investments in infrastructure, 101

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102 STEWARDSHIP OF FEDERAL FACILITIES environmental, economic, financial, and community renewal to increase public benefits and reduce costs. He also is a consultant on infrastructure policy and privatization, both nationally and internationally. Mr. Appleton served on the National Research Council Synthesis Committee for the Study of Sustainable Habitats. Before joining the RPA, Mr. Appleton was the commissioner of the New York City Department of Environmental Protection, where he carried out a major restructuring of the department's management, finances, and programs. Under his tenure, the department set records for capital construction and estab- lished modern business and financial planning systems. He was also executive assistant attorney general for the New York State Medicaid Fraud Control Unit and senior project planner in the Criminal Justice Coordinating Council of the Mayor of New York City. Mr. Appleton holds a B.A. from Gonzaga University and an LL.B. from Yale University Law School. Gary G. Briggs is senior vice president and chief operating officer of Consoli- dated Engineering Services, Inc. He founded this diversified engineering com- pany from components of the Charles E. Smith Companies to provide technical and consulting services for operations, maintenance, and facilities management, including mechanical plants and operations, fire safety and security, elevators and escalators, structures and envelopes, and energy management. These services are provided to more than 100 properties, including office buildings, residential units, retail malls, and recreational facilities. Previously, Mr. Briggs was the se- nior vice president and head of the Mechanical Department of Charles E. Smith Management, Inc. He has served on several National Research Council commit- tees, including the Committee on Feasibility of Applying Blast-Mitigating Tech- nologies and Design Methodologies from Military Facilities to Civilian Facili- ties, the Committee on Facility Design to Minimize Premature Obsolescence, and the Committee on Heating, Ventilating, and Air Conditioning Criteria. He holds a B.S. in physics from Drexel University and is a member of the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air Conditioning Engineers, the Building Owners and Managers Association, and the International Facility Management Associa- tion, among other professional organizations. Sebastian ,1. Calanni, retired, was the senior vice president for federal govern- ment services for Johnson Controls, Inc., a leading provider of facilities manage- ment, operations, maintenance, technical, and institutional services to govern- ment and commercial organizations. Mr. Calanni had general management responsibilities for all federal-sector business of Johnson Controls' integrated fa- cility management group. In this position, he provided corporate oversight for more than 40 federal government facility and infrastructure contracts valued at more than $500 million per year and involving more than 7,000 employees. In previous positions with Pan Am World Services, Mr. Calanni was project direc- tor for plant maintenance and operations at NASA's Johnson Space Center, and

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APPENDIX A 103 area manager for the Electromagnetic Environmental Test Facility at Fort Huachuca, Arizona, for the U.S. Army Signal Corps. Mr. Calanni has a B.S. in industrial management and an M.B.A. from the University of Houston. He is the recipient of three NASA Group Achievement Awards and participates in many 1 . . . civic and community organ~zahons. Eric T. Dillinger is the director of facilities management services with Carter & Burgess, Inc., a consulting firm that provides multidisciplinary engineering, ar- chitectural, planning, and surveying services. Mr. Dillinger's primary focus over the past 10 years has been in the area of facility management, including facility audits/condition assessment surveys, resource allocation, and capital asset man- agement. He has participated in and directed facility audits and capital asset man- agement programs for numerous federal government installations and agencies, as well as private-sector organizations. Mr. Dillinger also has extensive experi- ence in architectural/engineering endeavors, maintenance and repair prioritization, preventive and predictive maintenance, space utilization, inventory control, and scheduling and resource programming. His experience includes capital asset man- agement for more than 12.5 million square feet of facilities and an operations and maintenance budget of more than $25 million per year. Mr. Dillinger was the primary author of the Component Identification and Inspection Evaluation Stan- dards Manual (1990) and Value Based Budgeting (1991) for the U.S. govern- ment. He also contributed to A Practical Guide to Neural Nets (1991~. He has conducted seminars and trained facility managers, inspectors, and resource man- agers in facility maintenance standards, resource allocation, prioritization, and capital asset management for both government and private-sector clients. He has a B.S. in industrial engineering from Kansas State University and is a member of the International Facility Management Association, the Association of Higher Education Facility Officers, the Society of American Military Engineers (past post president), and the Society of American Military Comptrollers, among other organizations. William L. Gregory is manager of Corporate Facilities Management at Kennametal, Inc., a global provider of industrial tooling systems with annual sales of nearly $1 billion and 7,000 employees worldwide. At Kennametal, Mr. Gregory is responsible for real estate, corporate building operations, strategic facility planning, corporate environmental and health and safety programs, space management, installations, and construction management for all major facility projects on a global basis. Recent major projects include the construction of a manufacturing plant in China, a corporate technology center for research and development, and a new corporate headquarters. Mr. Gregory has also worked for Kennametal as a project manager, a facility manager, and a project electrical engineer. In a previous position with Westinghouse Electric Corporation, he was a project engineer. Mr. Gregory is a past international president of the International

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104 STEWARDSHIP OF FEDERAL FACILITIES Facilities Management Association (1993-1994) and past international vice presi- dent, treasurer, and regional vice president for the northeast region. As president of the association, Mr. Gregory oversaw its operation, including its international development and the formation of professional alliances. He has a B.S. in electri- cal engineering from Grove City College. He is a certified facility manager and a registered engineer in Pennsylvania and Ohio. B. James Halpern is president and chairman of the Board of Directors of Mea- suring and Monitoring Services, Inc. (MMSI), which specializes in field monitor- ing, data acquisition, information processing, and reporting for a variety of appli- cations in the energy, water, and environmental industries. MMSI also designs, develops, and manufactures integrated systems for comprehensive data acquisi- tion and reporting. Mr. Halpern created a product line and founded MMSI to provide measurement services to the energy services industry, focusing on demand- side management and utilizing performance-based contracts. Mr. Halpern is cur- rently chairman of the U.S. Department of Energy's Technical Subcommittee for the Establishment of a National Energy Measurement and Verification Protocol. Previously he was president of Energy Futures, a company he created to market and develop alternatively financed energy projects in New Jersey. He also was president of REEP, Inc., a residential conservation company that serviced utili- ties throughout the mid-Atlantic region. Mr. Halpern has a B.A. in architecture from Carnegie Mellon University. He is a member of the Association of Energy Engineers and the Illuminating Engineer Society of North America, among other organizations. James E. Kee is the interim dean and professor of public administration in the School of Business and Public Management at the George Washington Univer- sity. He is also the Giant Food, Inc., Professor of Public/Private Management. As dean, his responsibilities include budgeting, planning, and faculty development for a school with 120 full-time faculty members, 3,000 students, a budget of $15 million, and revenues of more than $31 million. He is also responsible for the development and funding of research centers and the development and imple- mentation of the school's strategic plan. He is the lead professor in the fields of budgeting and public finance and managing state and local governments. Profes- sor Kee has also been the senior associate dean, the chair of the Department of Public Administration, a faculty associate in Public Policy, and a member of the University President's Budget Advisory Team. His teaching and research inter- ests include public expenditure analysis, budget and tax policy, intergovernmen- tal relations and finance, state and local government management and finance, and developing and maintaining organizational excellence. Professor Kee has written chapters in several books dealing with benefit-cost analysis and strategic management in the federal government and has written numerous articles on pub- lic finance for all levels of government. He was the executive director of the

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APPENDIX A 105 Department of Administrative Services for the State of Utah from 1981 to 1985, where he was responsible for the coordinated management of finances and ad- ministrative services. During his tenure, a new on-line financial information man- agement system was created, and the annual $100 million capital building pro- gram and procedures were streamlined. He also served as the Utah state budget director, where he developed the state's first capital budget in 1981, and as state planning coordinator from 1976 to 1978. He has a B.A. from the University of Notre Dame, a J.D. from New York University School of Law, and an M.P.A. from New York University. Vivian E. Loftness is a professor of architecture at the Center for Building Per- formance and Diagnostics, head of the Department of Architecture, College of Fine Arts at Carnegie Mellon University, and a registered architect. She is an international consultant on energy and building performance for commercial and residential building design and has researched and written extensively on build- ing performance, energy conservation, and design-related subjects. Professor Loftness is conducting advanced architectural research in the performance of a range of building types, from museums to high-tech offices, and on innovative building delivery processes for improving the quality of building performance. Supported by the Advanced Building Systems Integration Consortium, a university- building industry partnership, Ms. Loftness has been actively researching and designing high performance office environments and was a key contributor to the creation of the Intelligent Workplace, a living laboratory of commercial building performance innovations. Ms. Loftness has authored a range of publications on international advances in the workplace. She has B.S. and M.S. degrees in archi- tecture from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Professor Loftness is a member of the National Research Council (NRC) Board on Infrastructure and the Constructed Environment and has previously served on several NRC committees, including the Committee on Advanced Maintenance Concepts in Buildings and the Committee on Electronically Enhanced Buildings. She was also a consultant to the Committee on Building Diagnostics. Terrance C. Ryan is the assistant dean and professor of urban systems engineer- ing in the Civil, Environmental, and Infrastructure Engineering Program at George Mason University (GMU). Dr. Ryan received M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in civil engineering systems from the University of Illinois, the latter after several years of field engineering experience with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. He is a graduate of the U.S. Military Academy and has more than 30 years of experience in construction management, information technology, operations research, and teaching. Dr. Ryan joined the faculty of GMU in 1989 from George Washington University, where he was a distinguished visiting professor and taught construc- tion management and decision science. While working at the U.S. Army's Con- struction Engineering Research Laboratories, Dr. Ryan was named Researcher of

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106 STEWARDSHIP OF FEDERAL FACILITIES the Year, and he has maintained his research interests in the applications of infor- mation technology and decision science in engineering and construction. He has been a construction manager of a large academic facility built for the Saudi Ara- bian government. As a vice president for a specialty retail chain, he was respon- sible for the design, construction, and maintenance of more than 120 stores and 300,000 square feet of space. A registered professional engineer in Virginia, his consulting experience has been in small business management, project manage- ment, and as regional director for a minority-owned architect/engineer firm spe- cializing in project management services. Dr. Ryan is currently the co-director of the Facilities Management Laboratory, executive director of the Urban Systems Engineering Institute, and director of the Fairfax/GMU Center for Community Reinvestment at George Mason University. Richard L. Siegle is director of facilities for the Washington State Historical Society, where he is responsible for the planning, design, construction, and man- agement of facilities owned by the society. His recent responsibilities include oversight of the development of the new $42 million state history museum. From 1986 to 1995, Mr. Siegle was responsible for the planning, design, construction, and maintenance of all Smithsonian Institution museum and research facilities. Resources included 1,290 professional and support staff and an annual operating budget of $125 million. Capital projects during the period exceeded $500 million. His responsibilities included preparing capital and facilities operating budgets for House and Senate committees of the Congress. Mr. Siegle was also a contribut- ing member of the Board and Design Committee of the Pennsylvania Avenue Development Corporation, which was involved in creating facilities in excess of $750 million. He was the director of design and construction of state buildings and the deputy director for the Department of General Administration for the State of Washington from 1978 to 1986. As an officer for more than 20 years with the Navy Civil Engineer Corps, Mr. Siegle served in engineering and teaching positions throughout the United States and in the Pacific and Far East. He is a regis- tered professional engineer, a fellow of the American Society of Civil Engineers, and a member of the National Society of Professional Engineers, the Association of Physical Plant Administrators, and the American Association of Museums. He previously served on the National Research Council Committee on Infrastruc- ture. Mr. Siegle received a B.S. in civil engineering from the University of Illi- nois and an M.S. in civil engineering from Stanford University. George M. White was appointed vice chairman of Leo A. Daly, one of the oldest and largest multidisciplinary design and management firms in the United States, in 1996. He previously served as the Architect of the Capitol for 25 years, where he was responsible for overseeing 13 million square feet of federal space, 2,300 employees, and an annual budget of approximately $180 to $200 million. Mr. White oversaw the restoration of the old Supreme Court chamber, the old Senate

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APPENDIX A 107 chamber and the west front of the U.S. Capitol, the construction of the Library of Congress James Madison Memorial Building, the Hart Senate Office Building, the extension of the U.S. Capitol Power Plant, and the Thurgood Marshall Fed- eral Judiciary Building, among other projects. He has also practiced architecture and law in the private sector and worked as a design engineer with the General Electric Company. Mr. White holds B.S. and M.S. degrees from the Massachu- setts Institute of Technology, an M.B.A. from Harvard University, and a J.D. from Case Western Reserve University. He is a fellow of the American Institute of Architects, an honorary fellow of the American Society of Civil Engineers, and a member of the National Society of Professional Engineers. He has also served on numerous panels and commissions and is the recipient of many awards.