Table A-1

Reference Regional Blood Flows (% of Cardiac Output) and Radon Tissue-to-Blood Partition Coefficients in PBPK Model.

Compartment

Flow (%)

λi

Compartment

Flow (%)

λi

Stomach Wall

1.0

0.7

Kidneys

19.0

0.66

Small Intestine Wall

10.0

0.7

Muscle

17.0

0.36

Upper Large Intestine Wall

2.0

0.7

Red Marrow

3.0

8.2

Lower Large Intestine Wall

2.0

0.7

Yellow Marrow

3.0

8.2

Pancreas

1.0

0.4

Trabecular Bone

0.9

0.36

Spleen

3.0

0.7

Cortical Bone

0.6

0.36

Adrenals

0.3

0.7

Adipose Tissue

5.0

11.2

Brain

12.0

0.7

Skin

5.0

0.36

Heart Wall

4.0

0.5

Thyroid

1.5

0.7

Liver

6.5

0.7

Testes

0.05

0.43

Lung Tissue

2.5

0.7

Other

3.2

0.7

Table A-2

Mass and Density of Organs in the Adult Male

Compartment

Mass (kg)

ρi

Compartment

Mass (kg)

ρi

Stomach Wall

0.15

1.05

Kidneys

0.31

1.05

Small Intestine Wall

0.64

1.04

Muscle

28.0

1.04

Upper Large Intestine Wall

0.21

1.04

Red Marrow

1.5

1.03

Lower Large Intestine Wall

0.16

1.04

Yellow Marrow

1.5

0.98

Pancreas

0.10

1.05

Trabecular Bone

1.0

1.92

Spleen

0.18

1.05

Cortical Bone

4.0

1.99

Adrenals

0.014

1.02

Adipose Tissue

12.5

0.92

Brain

1.4

1.03

Skin

2.6

1.05

Heart Wall

0.33

1.03

Thyroid

0.02

1.05

Liver

1.8

1.04

Testes

0.035

1.04

Lung Tissue

0.47

1.05

Other

3.2

1.04

The response of the model was shown graphically in chapter 4 and compared to experimental observations.

Other Ages

Considerably less information is available regarding cardiac output and blood volumes in the non-adult. Age-dependence in the model was introduced by assuming the blood flow to an organ was proportional to the mass of the organ; the constant of proportionality being derived from the adult values. The age-dependent masses were taken from ICRP Publication 56 (1989). The cardiac output was taken to be 0.6, 1.2, 3.7, 5.0, 6.2, and 6.5 L/min in the newborn, 1-, 5-, 10-, 15 year-old, and adult, respectively (Williams 1993). The volume of blood in the body was taken as 0.27, 0.5, 1.4, 2.4, 4.5, and 5.3 L in the newborn, 1-, 5-, 10-, 15 year-old, and adult, respectively (Williams 1993). In the absence of



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