Appendixes



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--> Appendixes

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--> A Biographical Sketches of Committee Members Edwin P. Przybylowicz, chair, retired as senior vice president and director of research in 1991 after 36 years in research and development with Eastman Kodak Company. From 1994 to 1996 he was director of the Center for Imaging Science at the Rochester Institute of Technology. He has co-chaired the National Research Council's Board on Chemical Sciences and Technology and served on several NRC panels and committees. He is a member of the Board of Directors of the New York State Science and Technology Foundation and a commissioner on the U.S.-Polish Joint Commission for Cooperation in Science and Technology of the Department of State. He was elected to the National Academy of Engineering in 1990 and received the 1996 Malcolm Pruitt Award from the Council for Chemical Research. Margaret A. Berger is the Suzanne J. and Norman Miles Professor of Law at Brooklyn Law School. She is an expert on the use of scientific evidence in criminal and civil judicial proceedings. She is the co-author of a multivolume treatise on federal evidence and several other books on evidence. She also contributed a chapter on ''Evidentiary Framework'' to the Federal Judicial Center's Reference Manual on Scientific Evidence . She has served as the reporter to the Advisory Committee on the Federal Rules of Evidence, as a consultant to the Carnegie Commission on Science and Technology, and as a member of the NRC Committee on DNA Technology in Forensic Science: An Update. Alexander Beveridge is the head of the chemistry section of the Vancouver Forensic Laboratory of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police. He has had 30 years of

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--> forensic chemistry casework experience. His primary research interest is the analysis of residues from explosives, and he recently edited Forensic Investigation of Explosions (Taylor and Francis, London, 1998). Dr. Beveridge is a fellow of the Chemical Institute of Canada and a faculty member of the Open University of British Columbia. He earned his B.Sc. degree and Ph.D. in chemistry from Glasgow University, has an M.B.A. from the University of Alberta, and currently is studying law at the University of British Columbia. He was a member of the NRC Committee on Marking, Rendering Inert, and Licensing of Explosive Materials. Leo R. Gizzi has over 25 years of experience in propellant manufacturing in the industrial community. He worked at Dupont before joining Hercules in 1972, where he worked mainly in propellant research and development as well as in quality management, becoming Quality and Technical Director at the Radford Army Ammunition Plant. His areas of expertise include propellant processing, quality control, ballistics, and chemical testing. Dr. Gizzi is knowledgeable about propellants for rockets, as well as for small-, medium-, and large-caliber guns used in commercial and military applications. He retired from Alliant Techsystems (previously Hercules, Inc.) in 1995. Currently Dr. Gizzi works as a freelance consultant specializing in propellants. Janice M. Hiroms specializes in chemical management consulting. Her experience includes management of analytical services for ARCO Chemical Company and Lyondell Petrochemical Company as well as being vice-president for health, safety, and environment for Lyondell-Citgo Refining Company. She has a B.A. in chemistry and an M.B.A. Karl V. Jacob founded the laboratory dedicated to solids processing at the Dow Chemical Company in 1989. The primary focus of his research has been on solids processing and particle and powder technology, specifically in powder mechanics and the drying and conveying of bulk solids. He is currently the vice-chair of the Particle Technology Forum, which is sponsored by the American Institute of Chemical Engineers. Charles Parmenter is a chemical physicist and a professor who does experimental research on fundamental chemical reactivity and molecular energy transfer at Indiana University. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the American Physical Society and has served on the editorial boards of several journals. He is currently on the NRC Office of Scientific and Engineering Personnel's Panel on Chemical Sciences and has also served on the Air Force Office of Scientific Research Chemical Sciences Review Panel.

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--> Per-Anders Persson is a professor of mining engineering at New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology, director of the Institute's Research Center for Energetic Materials, and chief scientist of its Energetic Materials Research and Testing Center, responsible for directing projects on safety and hazards of energetic materials. He is the inventor of the widely used NONEL fuse and detonator system and co-author of two textbooks, Detonics of High Explosives, with Johansson (Academic Press, San Diego, Calif., 1970) and Rock Blasting and Explosives Engineering, with Holmberg and Lee (CRC Press, Boca Raton, Fla., 1996). The recipient of a Ph.D. in physical chemistry from Cambridge University, England, and a former director of research and development for the Swedish explosives company Nitro Nobel AB, he has conducted studies in propellant and explosives burning, internal ballistics of guns, and the safety of energetic materials. He is a member of the Royal Swedish Academy of Engineering Sciences. Walter F. Rowe is chair and professor of forensic sciences at the George Washington University. He is a physical chemist who focuses on chemical techniques that may be used in the course of criminal investigations. His current research includes work on the detection of smokeless powder residues from pipe bombs. He is a fellow of the Criminalistic Section of the American Academy of Forensic Sciences and a member of the editorial board of The Journal of Forensic Sciences. Roger L. Schneider is a consultant in energetic materials with Rho Sigma Associates, Inc., specializing in pyrotechnics. His expertise includes chemical formulation, testing, analysis, and evaluation of energetic materials, as well as loss prevention. He serves frequently as an expert witness and has completed many accident reconstructions involving energetic materials. Since 1991, he has conducted research efforts for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers' Construction Engineering Research Laboratories, Champaign, Illinois, developing environmentally benign technologies for the disposal of energetic material production waste. Naval Reserve Captain Schneider was assigned during his last 7 years of service to naval research activities until his retirement in March 1998. He had collaborated with energetic material research staff at the Office of Naval Research, Naval Surface Warfare Center-Indian Head and the Naval Research Laboratory. Schneider has a Ph.D. degree (University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, 1982) in physical inorganic chemistry with minors in mechanical engineering and physics. Ronald L. Simmons is a senior technologist/project manager with the U.S. Navy, with more than 40 years of experience with solid propellants for guns, rockets, and explosives, including smokeless powder for small-arms ammunition. Before coming to the naval facility at Indian Head, he worked for Hercules and Rocketdyne, commercial producers of propellants. He is an associate fellow of the American Institute of Astronautics and Aeronautics.

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--> Judith Bannon Snow leads the High Explosives Science and Technology group at Los Alamos National Laboratory and is involved with explosives synthesis, formulation, chemical analysis, mechanical properties testing, micro-mechanical physics, nonshock initiation, deflagration to detonation theory, slow combustion, thermal studies, safety assessment, performance assessment, aging studies, and demilitarization of energetic materials. Prior to coming to Los Alamos, she spent 10 years at the Naval Undersea Warfare Center in New London, Connecticut, where she directed the Marine Optics Laboratory. Previously, she did nonlinear optics research in applied physics at Yale University. Dr. Snow has two patent awards and numerous scientific publications in laser spectroscopy, microparticle scattering, and nonlinear optics. She earned a Ph.D. in chemistry from Wesleyan University (Connecticut) and was a Sloan Fellow at the Stanford University Graduate School of Business, where she received an M.S. in management. She was a member of the NRC Committee on Marking, Rendering Inert, and Licensing of Explosive Materials. Ronald R. Vandebeek is the laboratory manager for the Canadian Explosives Research Laboratory (CERL), Canada Centre for Mineral and Energy Technology. He works on testing, hazard evaluation, and development of energetic materials. He has been at CERL for 27 years and has been manager of the facility since 1981. The responsibilities of CERL include the technical issues related to classification and regulation of explosives, as well as environmental effects of their use. Raymond S. Voorhees oversees the research and examination programs and activities of the Physical Evidence Section, U.S. Postal Inspection Service, which is responsible for nationwide crime scene response, including bombings. He also continues to work as a forensic analyst, performing chemical, instrumental, and microscopic examinations of physical evidence, and testifying about the results of such work. Before joining the U.S. Postal Inspection Service in 1983, he spent 13 years with the Metropolitan Police Department of Washington, D.C.