Appendix F Summary of the meeting and tour held on July 30, 1997, at the Argonne National Laboratory on the subject of the DOE Large-Scale Technology Demonstration Program associated with the D&D of the CP-5 Reactor

Trip Report by Joe Byrd and Milt Levensen for the CEMT Subcommittee on D&D Submitted August 12, 1997

Attendees

Samit K. Bhattacharyya

Associate Director, Technology Development Division, Argonne National Laboratory

Tom Yule

Program Manager, Technology Development Division, Argonne National Laboratory

Robert W. Rose

Project Manager, CP-5, Technology Development Division, Argonne National Laboratory

Dennis Haley

D&D Coordinator, EM-50 Robotics Program, Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

Joe Byrd

CEMT Subcommittee on D&D

Milt Levensen

CEMT Subcommittee on D&D

Documentation received prior to and during the meeting

Copies of overheads from presentations from Bhattacharyya and Rose

Technology Demonstration Summary Sheets (13 total)

Previous Trip Report on Subcommittee Visit to CP-5

Reference paper on ROSIE (from FETC D&D Review Meeting)

Reference paper on Dual Arm System (from FETC D&D Review Meeting)



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--> Appendix F Summary of the meeting and tour held on July 30, 1997, at the Argonne National Laboratory on the subject of the DOE Large-Scale Technology Demonstration Program associated with the D&D of the CP-5 Reactor Trip Report by Joe Byrd and Milt Levensen for the CEMT Subcommittee on D&D Submitted August 12, 1997 Attendees Samit K. Bhattacharyya Associate Director, Technology Development Division, Argonne National Laboratory Tom Yule Program Manager, Technology Development Division, Argonne National Laboratory Robert W. Rose Project Manager, CP-5, Technology Development Division, Argonne National Laboratory Dennis Haley D&D Coordinator, EM-50 Robotics Program, Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Joe Byrd CEMT Subcommittee on D&D Milt Levensen CEMT Subcommittee on D&D Documentation received prior to and during the meeting Copies of overheads from presentations from Bhattacharyya and Rose Technology Demonstration Summary Sheets (13 total) Previous Trip Report on Subcommittee Visit to CP-5 Reference paper on ROSIE (from FETC D&D Review Meeting) Reference paper on Dual Arm System (from FETC D&D Review Meeting)

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--> Introduction A complete report on the CP-5 LSDP was presented in a June 3, 1996, trip report from Trish Baisden and Frank Crimi on their visit to Argonne on April 18, 1996. The report includes the selection process for the LSDPs, discussion of the Strategic Alliance, technologies selection process, and technologies reporting process. This trip report will not repeat that detailed background information on the CP-5 project; it will reflect only information received and observations made during this brief visit. The primary purposes of this visit were to follow up on accomplishments since the previous visit at the beginning of the project and to report on the progress made, particularly in the use of robotics. Meeting Summary An overview of the Argonne site and its "Vision of the D&D Technology Center" was presented. D&D technology is now a "thrust area" of the ANL. ANL proposes to organize a D&D Technology Center and function as the leader in the area of D&D technologies. The Center is an internal ANL concept and does not relate to FETC or any current EM program. It is a concept of bringing together the various capabilities of ANL to bear on a single problem, independent of the source of the funds. The Center has completed three D&D projects and is making good progress in meeting its objectives in the CP-5 D&D project. The three completed projects were successful under a very limited objective suitable for internal use of the facility. None were completed to a "free release'' state, and none of the wastes were "disposed of." However, the end-state objective met ANL's needs. Much discussion was held concerning follow-through on a D&D project through storage, disposal, and/or recycle of the materials. At the present time these "total D&D" issues have not been addressed fully. Information was presented on the CP-5 project, including ANL's involvement as a DDFA LSDP. From the beginning, ANL has approached CP-5 as a D&D project, not just a demonstration of technologies. It did not limit the choice of demonstrated technologies to EM-50 constraints. A review of the Strategic Alliance organization and participation, the technology selection/rejection processes, and the reporting process was also presented. The selection committee evaluated 88 vendors and 55 innovative technologies. Although all documentation refers to "innovative" technologies, it was pointed out that many of the technologies chosen were proven, off-the-shelf systems using little or no innovative technology. This fact was acknowledged; apparently, "innovative" is used throughout the documentation, although it is recognized that it does not apply to all systems. Twenty-one technologies were selected for demonstration during the CP-5 D&D project. Five of these were robotic technologies. These five are discussed in the following section. Preliminary results of all demonstrated technologies were presented. Thirteen technology demonstrations have been com-

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--> pleted and one-page Technology Demonstration Summary Sheets have been published. The nine remaining demonstrations have been scheduled. The Green Book process has bogged down in its implementation. No Green Books for CP-5 have been published. Significant accomplishments, lessons learned, and future plans were reviewed. The final hour of the visit was a tour at the CP-5 facility. Current Robotics Demonstrations at CP-5 Two robotics systems are currently at CP-5: the Dual Arm System and the ROSIE Mobile Work Platform from RedZone Robotics, Inc., Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Dual Arm System: This system is currently in use to remove the reactor liner. The dual arms are commercial systems that can be configured for a specific application. ORNL developed the control console and software. INEL designed the deployment platform for use at CP-5. Unfortunately, the first failure had been experienced the evening before our visit and the system was undergoing maintenance. However, over 1,000 hours of trouble-free operation had been reported prior to that time. The operation and performance of this system has been judged to be reasonably satisfactory. There has been a learning curve associated with its operation (as with any new system) but operators have accepted it as an effective, useful tool. Tryouts were held for operation of this system. Approximately 70 percent of the operators made the first cut, and about two weeks were spent in training before actually using the system to perform work. The system has limitations since it was not designed specifically with CP-5 in mind. The system was designed to use commercial cutting tools (circular saw, router, etc.). The cutting tools were designed for 3/8-inch steel, whereas 3/4-inch materials exist at CP-5. This has resulted in a more time-consuming operation than originally estimated. Currently, the CP-5 is slightly behind schedule. ROSIE Mobile Platform: This system is on the floor at CP-5 but not currently in use. This is a mobile system containing a high-weight-capacity, long-reach boom. It has been demonstrated and operated by ANL operators. As with the dual arms, operators were given a try-out test. Approximately 50 percent of the operators made the cut for this system. It is perceived to be more complex in operation than the Dual Arm System. This would be expected in a mobile system that introduces another degree of freedom. The CP-5 project was not a good demonstration theater for ROSIE as currently configured. This system was developed by RedZone Robotics and funded through the FETC industry program. The original proposal by RedZone included a dexterous arm at the end of ROSIE's boom. This was a requirement for typical dismantling tasks. The proposal funding was cut to eliminate the dexterous arm. When ROSIE arrived at CP-5 without the arm, an arm was purchased to be used with ROSIE. However, the procured arm at ANL is not compatible with the hydraulic fluid used in

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--> ROSIE. Since there is no dexterous arm with tools, the system has very little use at CP-5. The work area around the reactor is too small for this large mobile system. It is perceived that with the proper tooling this could be a useful system for a variety of D&D operations. Three other robotic technology demonstrations have been completed: Mobile Automated Characterization System (MACS): MACS was not demonstrated as part of the Strategic Alliance LSDP contract. It was an effort with ORNL during July 1996 prior to the beginning of the official LSDP. CP-5 was a poor choice as a demonstration site for this system. It is a mobile robot designed to autonomously characterize large floor areas such as those at Oak Ridge K-25. A small work area around the CP-5 reactor was used as the test bed. It performed well in that area, but could not be adapted to the circular walls, etc. It was too large to survey the desired areas around CP-5. However, it is perceived to have high potential usage in the environment for which it was designed. Pipe Crawler Radiological Surveying System: Pipe Crawler, a teleoperated system developed by Radiological Service, Inc., as part of a turnkey pipe inspection, decontamination, and survey service, was demonstrated in December 1996. Surveys were conducted primarily in the rod storage holes, along with portions of a pair of 12-inch vent lines servicing the reactor area. Several rod storage holes each of 5-, 6-, and 12-inch diameter and 10-to 17-foot depth were surveyed along with 40 feet of the combined vent lines. Surveys were preceded by video inspections but without the benefit of pipe pre-decontamination. These demonstrations are considered very successful with potential widespread usage for a variety of D&D projects. This is a commercial system available from a service provider. Pipe Explorer System: Pipe Explorer, developed by Science & Engineering Associates, Inc., is a teleoperated method for transporting characterization tools into pipes and ducts. It deploys a plastic membrane to provide a clean conduit for the sensors to travel through. This July 1996 demonstration was involved in alpha surveys of the internal area of three 5-inch pipeline holes in the CP-5 rod storage area. In addition, a video inspection and a beta/gamma survey of a 3-inch drain line in the CP-5 yard area were completed. These demonstrations are considered very successful with potential widespread usage for a variety of D&D projects. This is a commercial product. General Comments ANL has viewed the CP-5 project primarily as an ANL D&D Project and secondarily as the Focus Area LSDP. They had formalized plans and schedules for the CP-5 project prior to being selected as an LSDP site. The demonstrations have been beneficial in providing mechanisms and

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--> procedures for contract vendors to get onto nuclear sites and have provided them a better understanding of working at a nuclear facility. Operation of the Dual Arm System and ROSIE has provided information on the selection process and the training required for using on-site operators with new robotic equipment. The technologies selected for demonstration did not have detailed test plans prior to arrival at CP-5. DOE determined the makeup of the Strategic Alliance.