APPENDIX B
Biographical Sketches of Committee Members

R. BYRON PIPES, chair, NAE, was president of Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute from 1993 to 1998. He was provost and vice president for academic affairs at the University of Delaware from 1991 to 1993 and served as dean of the College of Engineering and director of the Center for Composite Materials from 1977 to 1991. He was appointed Robert L. Spencer Professor of Engineering at the University of Delaware in 1986 in recognition of his outstanding scholarship in the field of composite materials in the subject areas of advanced manufacturing science, durability, design, and characterization. Dr. Pipes is the author of more than 100 archival publications, including four books, and has served on the editorial boards of three journals in his field. He has been recognized for his leadership in creating partnerships for university research with the private sector, government, and academia, and served as one of the first six directors of the National Engineering Research Centers of the National Science Foundation. Dr. Pipes received his Ph.D. in mechanical engineering from the University of Texas and an M.S.E. from Princeton University. He is the recipient of the Gustus L. Larson Award of Pi Tau Sigma and the Chaire Francqui Distinguished Faculty Scholar Award in Belgium. Dr. Pipes was elected to the Royal Swedish Academy of Engineering Sciences in 1993 and holds the rank of fellow in both the American Society of Mechanical Engineers and the Society for the Advancement of Material and Process Engineering. Dr. Pipes has served on a number of National Research Council panels as both a member and chair and served two terms on the National Materials Advisory Board.

WILLIAM HOOVER, vice chair, is currently a consultant on aviation, defense, and energy matters. He is the former executive vice president of the Air Transport Association of America, where he represented the interests of the U.S. major airlines industry, particularly in matters related to technical, safety, and security issues. Prior to holding this position, he served as the assistant secretary of defense programs, U.S. Department of Energy, where he was responsible for the U.S. nuclear weapons program, including safety and security. He is also a Major General, USAF (retired) and has held positions of responsibility within NATO, at the Pentagon with the Secretary of the Air Force, and in Vietnam, where he commanded a combat air wing and flew as a fighter pilot. General Hoover is currently chair of the National Research Council's Aeronautics and Space Engineering Board. He holds a B.S. in engineering from the U.S. Naval Academy and an M.S. in aeronautical engineering from the Air Force Institute of Technology.



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Maintaining U.S. Leadership in Aeronautics: Breakthrough Technologies to Meet Future Air and Space Transportation Needs and Goals APPENDIX B Biographical Sketches of Committee Members R. BYRON PIPES, chair, NAE, was president of Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute from 1993 to 1998. He was provost and vice president for academic affairs at the University of Delaware from 1991 to 1993 and served as dean of the College of Engineering and director of the Center for Composite Materials from 1977 to 1991. He was appointed Robert L. Spencer Professor of Engineering at the University of Delaware in 1986 in recognition of his outstanding scholarship in the field of composite materials in the subject areas of advanced manufacturing science, durability, design, and characterization. Dr. Pipes is the author of more than 100 archival publications, including four books, and has served on the editorial boards of three journals in his field. He has been recognized for his leadership in creating partnerships for university research with the private sector, government, and academia, and served as one of the first six directors of the National Engineering Research Centers of the National Science Foundation. Dr. Pipes received his Ph.D. in mechanical engineering from the University of Texas and an M.S.E. from Princeton University. He is the recipient of the Gustus L. Larson Award of Pi Tau Sigma and the Chaire Francqui Distinguished Faculty Scholar Award in Belgium. Dr. Pipes was elected to the Royal Swedish Academy of Engineering Sciences in 1993 and holds the rank of fellow in both the American Society of Mechanical Engineers and the Society for the Advancement of Material and Process Engineering. Dr. Pipes has served on a number of National Research Council panels as both a member and chair and served two terms on the National Materials Advisory Board. WILLIAM HOOVER, vice chair, is currently a consultant on aviation, defense, and energy matters. He is the former executive vice president of the Air Transport Association of America, where he represented the interests of the U.S. major airlines industry, particularly in matters related to technical, safety, and security issues. Prior to holding this position, he served as the assistant secretary of defense programs, U.S. Department of Energy, where he was responsible for the U.S. nuclear weapons program, including safety and security. He is also a Major General, USAF (retired) and has held positions of responsibility within NATO, at the Pentagon with the Secretary of the Air Force, and in Vietnam, where he commanded a combat air wing and flew as a fighter pilot. General Hoover is currently chair of the National Research Council's Aeronautics and Space Engineering Board. He holds a B.S. in engineering from the U.S. Naval Academy and an M.S. in aeronautical engineering from the Air Force Institute of Technology.

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Maintaining U.S. Leadership in Aeronautics: Breakthrough Technologies to Meet Future Air and Space Transportation Needs and Goals RAMESH AGARWAL is executive director of the National Institute for Aviation Research at Wichita State University, which conducts research and technology transfer activities for the purpose of advancing the nation's aviation industry, including the general aviation industry. He is also the former chair of the Aerospace Engineering Department, holds the Bloomfield Distinguished Professorship in the College of Engineering, and is senior fellow at the National Institute for Aviation Research. Since receiving a Ph.D. in aeronautical sciences from Stanford University, Dr. Agarwal has conducted both basic and applied research in all aspects of computational fluid dynamics applied to transport and military aircraft, missiles and launch vehicles, and rotorcraft. He is a fellow of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, and the American Association for the Advancement of Science. JACK BLUMENTHAL, NAE, recently retired as assistant director of the TRW Center for Automotive Technology, where he was responsible for the design and manufacture of advanced technologies for use in automobiles, including ''smart" air bag/seat belt systems for passenger safety. Prior to holding this position, Dr. Blumenthal was employed by the TRW Defense and Space Sector in a number of functions related to research and the management of research in manufacturing, chemical engineering, catalysis, high-temperature materials, combustion, and rocket propulsion. He received his Ph.D. in chemical engineering from the University of California, Los Angeles, holds 16 U.S. patents, and is the author or co-author of more than 28 publications. HEINZ GERHARDT is principal engineer and team leader for advanced projects in the Military Aircraft Systems Division of the Northrop Grumman Corporation. In recent years, he was in charge of the design of a high-speed civil transport aircraft achieving increased performance by incorporating a reverse delta wing to attain natural laminar flow. He also has been involved in a study to explore the synergistic benefits of liquid hydrogen for jet fuel and thermal laminar flow control in subsonic, long-range surveillance aircraft. Mr. Gerhardt has worked for Northrop Grumman since 1962 in various research and management positions during which time he developed a number of innovative concepts, including variable span wings, transverse thrust for lift augmentation, and a linear turbine for maglev train propulsion. He graduated with a Diplom-Ingenieur degree (M.S. equivalent) in mechanical engineering from the Technical University, Darmstadt, Germany. He is an associate fellow of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, which awarded him the Aerodynamics Award in 1994. Mr. Gerhardt holds 12 patents. EDWARD GREITZER, NAE, is currently director of Aeromechanical, Chemical, and Fluid Systems at United Technologies Research Center, on leave from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology's (MIT) Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics, where he was associate head. He is also a former director of the MIT Gas Turbine Laboratory. Dr. Greitzer's research at MIT and at Pratt & Whitney (prior to joining the MIT faculty) has focused on fluid dynamics, propulsion, turbomachinery, gas turbine engines, and active control of aeromechanical systems. He is a fellow of the

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Maintaining U.S. Leadership in Aeronautics: Breakthrough Technologies to Meet Future Air and Space Transportation Needs and Goals American Society of Mechanical Engineers and the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, holds several patents, has authored or co-authored more than 50 publications, and has been a member of the Air Force Scientific Advisory Board and the NASA Aeronautics Advisory Committee. Dr. Greitzer received his undergraduate and graduate degrees in mechanical engineering from Harvard University. RICHARD GOLASZEWSKI is executive vice president of GRA, Incorporated (formerly Gellman Research Associates), where he specializes in aviation economics, public policy, and safety. He has conducted studies of airports, airlines, aircraft manufacturers, and aviation infrastructure. He also has directed major studies on the appropriate role of government in civil aeronautics research and international competition in civil aircraft manufacturing. Mr. Golaszewski joined GRA in 1977 and holds a B.S. in accounting from La Salle College and an M.P.A. from the Wharton Graduate School of the University of Pennsylvania. He has been a lecturer at both the Wharton School and La Salle College. Mr. Golaszewski is a member of the Economics and Forecasting Committee of the National Research Council's Transportation Research Board and the Economics and Public Policy technical committees of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics. Currently, he is program vice president of the Transportation Research Forum. R. JOHN HANSMAN is a professor in the Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), where he is head of the Humans and Automation Division. He also directs the MIT Aeronautical Systems Laboratory and the MIT International Center for Air Transportation. He has been a member of the faculty since receiving an interdisciplinary Ph.D. in physics, meteorology, electrical engineering, and aeronautical engineering from MIT in 1982. Since 1980, Dr. Hansman's research has been focused on a broad range of flight safety topics, from aviation weather hazards, such as icing and windshear, to instrumentation and pilot-vehicle interface issues. He is the author of more than 150 technical publications in these areas and holds five patents. Dr. Hansman also has more than 4,600 hours of flight experience in airplanes, helicopters, and sailplanes. CHANTAL JOUBERT is the manager of the Aircraft Protection Group in the Advanced Aircraft Programs Division of Phantom Works at Boeing, Long Beach, California (formerly McDonnell Douglas Aerospace). She is responsible for managing advanced transport aircraft design studies through the evaluation of aircraft survivability and protection. Prior to holding this position, Ms. Joubert was deputy program manager for the Aircraft Hardening Program. She has also managed a number of activities related to the design and development of integrated concepts for laminar flow control, propulsion and environmental controls, and advanced design engineering on both subsonic and supersonic commercial transport aircraft. She holds an Sc.B. in mechanical engineering from Brown University and an M.S. in mechanical engineering from California State University, Long Beach.

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Maintaining U.S. Leadership in Aeronautics: Breakthrough Technologies to Meet Future Air and Space Transportation Needs and Goals ANN KARAGOZIAN is a professor in the Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA). Her research interests lie in the fluid mechanics of combustion systems, with current emphasis on numerical simulation and experimental interrogation of acoustically driven reacting flows and high-speed combustion systems. Dr. Karagozian is currently a member of the Air Force Scientific Advisory Board and the NASA Aeronautics and Space Transportation Technology Advisory Committee. She was a member of the NASA Federal Laboratory Review Task Force and the Defense Science Study Group and has served on technical panels and committees for the National Research Council, the Environmental Protection Agency, the U.S. Department of Energy, and the National Science Foundation. She is an associate fellow of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics and in 1987 was the recipient of the TRW-UCLA Excellence in Teaching Award. She received her B.S. in engineering from UCLA and her M.S. and Ph.D. in mechanical engineering from the California Institute of Technology. She is a registered professional mechanical engineer in the state of California. DONALD L. NIELSON is the director of the Computing and Engineering Sciences Division and the vice president of SRI International, Menlo Park, California. From 1975 to 1984, he was the director of SRI's Telecommunications Sciences Center. Dr. Nielson's expertise is in information technology, including Information transport systems, distributed processing, artificial intelligence-aided language and reasoning systems, terminal systems and human-computer interaction, computer and communications security, information media and standards, telecommunications sciences, and image processing. He has also studied the problems of inserting advanced commercial-off-the-shelf information technology into field deployable military systems. Dr. Nielson has served on a number of government advisory committees and panels on information technology, including the Technical Advisory Committee to the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, the Scientific Advisory Board for the Director, Defense Communications Agency, and the Air Force Scientific Advisory Board. He received his Ph.D. in electrical engineering from Stanford University. ROBERT J. POLUTCHKO recently retired from Lockheed Martin Corporation as an executive officer and the vice president for technical operations, Lockheed Martin Aeronautics Sector. In this position, he was responsible for the technical management and oversight of all Aeronautics Sector programs, including engineering, development, test, operations, and research and development. Prior to this, he was the senior vice president of technical operations for the Martin Marietta Corporation and vice president of technical operations of the Space Group. He has also been president of the Martin Marietta Information Systems Group and vice president and general manager of the Space and Electronics Division in Denver. He is currently serving on the independent NASA Task Force for Cost Assessment and Validation for the International Space Station. Mr. Polutchko is an elected fellow of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics and received his B.S. and M.S. degrees in aeronautical and astronautical engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

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Maintaining U.S. Leadership in Aeronautics: Breakthrough Technologies to Meet Future Air and Space Transportation Needs and Goals MARTIN POZESKY is president of MTP Associates. Since 1994, he has provided technical, management, and strategic consulting services in air traffic control programs encompassing telecommunications, surveillance, automation, weather, navigation, and landing, and avionics systems. Before forming MTP Associates, Mr. Pozesky worked for the Federal Aviation Administration, where he retired as associate administrator of systems engineering and development. He led U.S. efforts to apply GPS satellite technology to aviation and air traffic control and has led global initiatives in air traffic management, aviation systems engineering, planning, program formulation, program management, and systems integration for more than 20 years. He holds a B.S. in electrical engineering from the University of Maryland and an M.S. in engineering and operations research from George Washington University. RICHARD R. WEISS is currently a consultant in aerospace science and engineering involving launch vehicles and space systems and is a noted expert on rocket propulsion and technology development. Previously, he was deputy director for space launch systems and technology in the Office of the Undersecretary of Defense, Missiles and Space Systems. Prior to that, he served in increasingly responsible positions in the Air Force laboratory system, including chief scientist of the Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, director of the Aeronautics Laboratory, and, after consolidation, Director of the Propulsion Directorate, Phillips Laboratory. Dr. Weiss has been involved in development and transition of advanced technology for the majority of space and missile (both strategic and tactical) systems in the U.S. inventory today, including the space shuttle main engine. He has served on many national and international committees and directed the Technical Panel for the congressionally directed Space Launch Modernization Panel, chaired by Gen. Thomas Moorman. Dr. Weiss has received several awards, including the Air Force Outstanding Civilian Achievement Award and the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics 1994 Wyld Propulsion Award for leadership in developing propulsion technology. Dr. Weiss holds a Ph.D. from Purdue University, an M.S. degree from the University of Southern California in mechanical engineering, and a B.S. degree from the University of Michigan in aeronautical engineering. TERRENCE WEISSHAAR is a professor in the School of Aeronautics and Astronautics at Purdue University where he teaches aircraft structures, aircraft design, and aeroelasticity. His research has focused on aircraft structural design and optimization, including active control of aeroelastic stability. He has worked in the area of optimally tailored advanced composite structures to control flutter and wing divergence of advanced aircraft and was an early participant in the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency X-29 Forward Swept Wing Demonstrator Program. Dr. Weisshaar holds a B.S. in mechanical engineering from Northwestern University, an S.M. degree in aeronautics and astronautics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and a Ph.D. in aeronautics and astronautics from Stanford University. He is a fellow of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics in recognition of his contributions to advanced composites and aeroelasticity and is a current member of the U.S. Air Force Scientific Advisory Board.

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Maintaining U.S. Leadership in Aeronautics: Breakthrough Technologies to Meet Future Air and Space Transportation Needs and Goals PETER WILHELM, NAE, is the director of the Naval Center for Space Technology, where he has led in the development of two upper-stage vehicles that incorporated solid fuel, bipropellant, monopropellant, and cold gas rockets. He also has directed efforts to develop advanced technology to lower space transportation costs. These technologies include advanced propulsion (hybrid, bimodal, and electric), as well as structures, guidance, and mission operations, including reusability. Mr. Wilhelm's involvement in the development of low-cost launch technology began with the initiation of the Sea Launch and Recovery (SEALAR) Program. Mr. Wilhelm has a B.S. in electrical engineering from Purdue University and is a fellow of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics.