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Appendix B Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff ROBERT MCC. ADAMS iS Harold H. Swift distinguished service professor of anthropology and director of the Oriental Institute, University of Chicago. Previously he also served as director of the Oriental Institute 1962-1968 and as dean of the Division of Social Sciences 1970-1974 and 1979-1980. His archaeological field studies in Iraq, Iran, Syria, Saudi Arabia, and Mexico have primarily concerned the history of land use and urban settlement. He is author of Land Behind Baghdad (\1965), The Evolution of Urban Society (1966), and Heartland of Cities (1981) and coauthor of The Urak Countryside (1972~. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and the American Philosophical Society and a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the American Anthropological Association, and the Middle East Studies Association. He received PhB, AM, and PhD degrees from the University of Chicago. DAVID A. HAMBURG iS director of the Division of Health Policy Research and Education, Harvard University. Previously he was president of the Institute of Medicine 1975-1980, professor and chairman of the Department of Psychiatry at Stanford Medical School 1961-1972, and Sherman Fairchild distinguished scholar at the California Institute of Technology 1974-1975. His research is concerned with psychological stress and endocrine function, psychotherapy in crisis, and genetics, hormones, and behavior. He is coauthor of The Great Apes (1979), Biobehavioral Aspects of Aggression (1981), and Health and Behavior: Frontiers of Research in Biobehavioral Sciences (19821. He is a member of the board of directors of the American Association 117

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118 Appendix B for the Advancement of Science, a member of the council of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, past president of the Academy for Behavioral Medicine Research and the International Society for Research on Aggression, and a member and past chairman of the Psychiatric Research Society. He received an MD from Indiana University. JUANITA M. KREPS, an economist, was U.S. Secretary of Commerce 1977- 1981. Previously she was James B. Duke professor of economics at Duke University 1972-1977 and vice president of Duke University 1973-1977. Her research in economics has been in the field of labor economics with special emphasis on retirement and income problems of the elderly. She is author of Sex and the Marketplace: American Women at Work (1971) and coauthor of Principles of Economics (revised edition 1965) and Contemporary Labor Economics (19741. She is a member of the boards of directors of American Telephone and Telegraph, Citicorp, Armco, R. J. Reynolds, J. C. Penney, Eastman Kodak, and UAL Incorporated and a trustee of the Duke Endowment. She received an AB degree from Berea College and MA and PhD degrees from Duke University. GARDNER LINDZEY, a psychologist, is director of the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences, Palo Alto, California. Previously he held faculty positions at Pennsylvania State University, Western Reserve Univer- sity, Harvard University, Syracuse University, the University of Minnesota, and the University of Texas. His research involves studies of personality, social psychology, and genetics and behavior. He is coauthor of Theories of Personality (1957, 1970, 1978), Projective Techniques and Cross-Cultural Research (1961), and Race Differences in Intelligence (1975) and editor of the Handbook of Social Psychology (1954~. He is a member of the Institute of Medicine, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and the American Philosophical Society and past president of the American Psychological Association and the Society for the Study of Social Biology. He received AB and MS degrees from Pennsylvania State University and a PhD from Harvard University. ELIZABETH F. LOFTUS iS professor of psychology at the University of Washington. Previously she was on the faculty of the New School for Social Research. Her work in experimental psychology has been in the areas of human memory and eyewitness testimony. She is author of Eyewitness Testimony (1979) and Memory (1980) and coauthor of Psychology (1981) and Essence of Statistics (1982~. She received a BA from the University of California, Los Angeles, and MA and PhD degrees from Stanford University.

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Appendix ~ 119 NAMES G. MARCH iS Fred H. Merrill professor of management in the Graduate School of Business, Stanford University, and senior fellow at the Hoover Institution. He also holds appointments in political science, sociology, and education at Stanford University. His research is concerned with organizations, decisions, and leadership. He is coauthor of Organizations (1958), A Behavioral Theory of the Firm (1963), and Leadership and Ambiguity (19741. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences, the National Academy of Education, and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He was a member of the National Science Board 1968-1974 and of the National Council of Educational Research 1974-1978. He received a BA from the University of Wisconsin and MA and PhD degrees from Yale University. JESSICA T. MATHEWS iS a member of the editorial board of The Washington Post. Previously she was director of the office of global issues of the National Security Council 1977-1979, director of issues and research for the 1976 presidential campaign of Morris Udall, and a congressional science fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science 1973-1974. Her research interests in biophysics and biochemistry have focused on molecular mechanisms and the control of development. She has been a member of the Committee on Scientific Freedom and Responsibility and the Committee on Science and Public Policy of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. She received a BA from Radcliffe College and a PhD from the California Institute of Technology. PHILIP MESON iS Institute professor of physics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. His research focuses on the application of principles of physics to astronomy. He is the author of many research papers in high- energy astrophysics and since 1964 has been a book reviewer for Scientific American. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and the International Astronomical Union, a fellow of the American Physical Society, and a founding member and former chairman of the Federation of American Scientists. He received a BS from Carnegie Institute of Technology and a PhD from the University of California, Berkeley. CHARLES A. MOSHER was a member of the U.S. House of Representatives from the 13th district of Ohio 1961-1977. He was also adjunct professor in science policy of the George Washington University, acting executive director of the House Committee on Science and Technology 1977-1978, and a fellow at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars 1980-1981. His career has also included positions as editor-publisher of community news- papers. He is a trustee of Oberlin College. He received an AB degree from Oberlin College. /

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120 Appendix B KENNETH PREWITT, a political scientist, is president of the Social Science Research Council. Previously he was director of the National Opinion Research Center and professor of political science at the University of Chicago. His research interests include the recruitment of political leaders and issues affecting national science policy. He is author of The Recruitment of Political Leadership (1970) and Labyrinths of Democracy (1973~. He is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He received a BA from Southern Methodist University, an MA from the University of Washington, and a PhD from Stanford University. PAUL A. SAMUELSON iS Institute professor of economics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. His research focuses on economic analysis and policy formation, for which he won the Nobel memorial award in economics in 1970. He is author of Foundations of Economic Analysis (1947), Linear Programming and Economic Analysis (1958), and Collected Scientific Papers (Volumes 1 and 2, 1966; Volume 3, 1972; Volume 4, 1977~. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences, the American Philosophical Society, and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He is past president of the Econometric Society, the American Economic Association, and the International Economics Association. He received a BA from the University of Chicago and MA and PhD degrees from Harvard University. NEIL I. SMELSER iS University professor of sociology at the University of California, Berkeley. His work involves the sociology of economic devel- opment and economic institutions, social change, and collective behavior and social movements. He is author of Social Change in the Industrial Revolution (1959) and Theory of Collective Behavior (19631. He is a member of the American Philosophical Association and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He received a BA degree from Harvard College, BA and MA degrees from Oxford University, and a PhD from Harvard University, and he completed training in psychoanalysis at the San Francisco Psychoan- alytic Institute. SAM BASS WARNER, JR., iS William Edwards Huntington professor of history and social science at Boston University. His professional interests center on the history of cities. He is author of Streetcar Suburbs, The Process of Growth in Boston 1870-1900 (1962), The Private City, Philadelphia in Three Periods of Its Growth (1968), The Urban Wilderness, A History of the American City (1972), and The Way We Really Lived, Social Change in Metropolitan Boston Since 1920 (1978J. He is a member of the executive council of the Organization of American Historians. He was a member of

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Appendix ~ 121 the advisory council of the United States National Archives 1969-1972. He received AB and PhD degrees from Harvard University. ROBERT B. ZAJONC iS professor of psychology at the University of Michigan and program director of the Research Center for Group Dynamics. His research involves cognitive processes, social facilitation, and family config- uration and intelligence. He is author of Social Psychology (1965) and Animal Social Behavior (19721. He is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He received BA, MA, and PhD degrees from the University of Michigan. DONALD I. TRElMAN iS professor of sociology at the University of California, Los Angeles, from which he took a leave of absence to serve as study director of the committee. His work is in the fields of social stratification and mobility, especially cross-national comparisons, and labor force demography. He is author of Occupational Prestige in Comparative Perspective (1977~. He is a member of the Population Association of America and of the research committee on stratification of the International Sociological Association. He has a BA from Reed College and MA and PhD degrees from the University of Chicago.