Appendix A Committee and Staff Biographies

Marie C. McCormick, M.D., Sc.D. (Chair), graduated from Emmanuel College (B.A. in chemistry) and from the Johns Hopkins Medical School (M.D.) and the John Hopkins School of Hygiene and Public Health (Sc.D.). She completed her training in pediatrics at the Johns Hopkins Hospital. She has served on the faculty of the University of Illinois Abraham Lincoln Medical School, the Johns Hopkins Medical School and School of Hygiene and Public Health, and the University of Pennsylvania. She joined Harvard initially as an associate professor of pediatrics at the Harvard Medical School, and later became the Sumner and Ester Feldberg Professor and Chair of the Department of Maternal and Child Health, Harvard School of Public Health, and professor of pediatrics at the Harvard Medical School. Since completing her training, she has pursued two overlapping research interests: the effect of health services on perinatal and infant outcomes at birth, with a particular focus on elucidating the factors influencing the outcomes of very premature infants, and the evaluation of programs for children and their families. She has written on the health outcomes of infants born at risk, the services that may influence such outcomes, and the broader effect of child health and developmental programs. She was elected to the Institute of Medicine (IOM) of the National Academy of Sciences in 1997 and has been a member of the Board on Health Promotion and Disease Prevention since 1993. She chaired the earlier IOM Committee on Perinatal and Newborn Screenings for HIV Infection (1990–1991).

Ezra C. Davidson, Jr., M.D. (Vice-Chair), is associate dean, primary care, and professor (past chairman 1971–1996) of the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology,



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--> Appendix A Committee and Staff Biographies Marie C. McCormick, M.D., Sc.D. (Chair), graduated from Emmanuel College (B.A. in chemistry) and from the Johns Hopkins Medical School (M.D.) and the John Hopkins School of Hygiene and Public Health (Sc.D.). She completed her training in pediatrics at the Johns Hopkins Hospital. She has served on the faculty of the University of Illinois Abraham Lincoln Medical School, the Johns Hopkins Medical School and School of Hygiene and Public Health, and the University of Pennsylvania. She joined Harvard initially as an associate professor of pediatrics at the Harvard Medical School, and later became the Sumner and Ester Feldberg Professor and Chair of the Department of Maternal and Child Health, Harvard School of Public Health, and professor of pediatrics at the Harvard Medical School. Since completing her training, she has pursued two overlapping research interests: the effect of health services on perinatal and infant outcomes at birth, with a particular focus on elucidating the factors influencing the outcomes of very premature infants, and the evaluation of programs for children and their families. She has written on the health outcomes of infants born at risk, the services that may influence such outcomes, and the broader effect of child health and developmental programs. She was elected to the Institute of Medicine (IOM) of the National Academy of Sciences in 1997 and has been a member of the Board on Health Promotion and Disease Prevention since 1993. She chaired the earlier IOM Committee on Perinatal and Newborn Screenings for HIV Infection (1990–1991). Ezra C. Davidson, Jr., M.D. (Vice-Chair), is associate dean, primary care, and professor (past chairman 1971–1996) of the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology,

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--> the Charles R. Drew University of Medicine and Science. He currently holds professorships in obstetrics and gynecology at the University of California, Los Angeles and Dartmouth Schools of Medicine. He was chief-of-service, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at King/Drew Medical Center in Los Angeles (1971–1996). He was a Robert Wood Johnson Health Policy Fellow at the IOM (1979–1980), during which time he served as a health adviser to Senator Bill Bradley of New Jersey. He has served on a number of IOM–National Academy of Sciences (NAS) study committees on issues of national health policy and has worked with government and private organizations in this regard. He has served the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists as President (1990–1991) and national secretary for six years. His other major organizational responsibilities have included chair of the Board of Trustees of the National Medical Association and president of the Association of Professors of Gynecology and Obstetrics. He has chaired the Secretary's Advisory Committee on Infant Mortality (U.S. Department Health and Human Services) and the Advisory Committee for Reproductive Health Drugs of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). He serves on the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Advisory Committee to the Director and the Advisory Committee on Clinical Research. He is a member of the Council on Graduate Medical Education (COGME) and the California Wellness Foundation's Board of Directors. He has been elected to the National Black College Alumni Hall of Fame, Fellowship ad eundem, Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists, and the IOM. Fred Battaglia, M.D., graduated from Cornell University (B.A.) and Yale University School of Medicine. After service as a medical intern at Johns Hopkins Hospital, he spent two years doing research in the Department of Biochemistry in Cambridge, England, and the Department of Physiology at Yale University School of Medicine. His served his residency at Johns Hopkins University after which he completed a fellowship in the Laboratory of Perinatal Physiology in San Juan, Puerto Rico. He has been a professor of pediatrics and obstetrics-gynecology at the University of Colorado School of Medicine since 1969 and served as the chairman of the Department of Pediatrics from 1974 to 1988. He was elected to the Institute of Medicine in 1986. He has served on advisory committees to the March of Dimes; the Joseph P. Kennedy, Jr., Foundation; the National Institutes of Health, and several foundations. He is a member of several editorial boards. Ronald S. Brookmeyer, Ph.D., is professor in the Department of Biostatistics at the Johns Hopkins University School of Hygiene and Public Health. He has a Ph.D. in statistics from the University of Wisconsin. He has authored more than 90 scientific articles and books in biostatistics, epidemiologic methods, and AIDS and is coauthor of the book entitled AIDS Epidemiology: A Quantitative Approach.

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--> His research has included statistical methods in epidemiologic studies of AIDS. He was one of the developers of the back-calculation method that is widely used for estimating and projecting the size of the epidemic. In 1992, he was awarded the Spiegelman gold medal by the American Public Health Association for contributions to health statistics. His National Research Council (NRC) committee service includes the Committee on National Statistics, the Committee on Statistical Issues in AIDS Research, and the Panels on Needle Exchange Programs and Social Security Disability Research. He has also served on the Clinical Research Committee for the AIDS Research Advisory Committee of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) He was on the editorial board of Statistics in Medicine from 1985 to 1994 and has served on the regional advisory board of the Biometrics Society and as chair of the Biometrics Section of the American Statistical Association. He is a fellow of both the American Statistical Association and the American Association for the Advancement of Science. Deborah Cotton, M.D., M.P.H., is professor of medicine and public health, Boston University School of Medicine, and director, Office of Clinical Research, Boston University Medical Center. She also serves as assistant provost of the Boston University Medical Campus. Dr. Cotton received her A.B. cum laude from Brandeis University, M.D. cum laude from Boston University, and M.P.H. from the Johns Hopkins University. A specialist in infectious diseases, Dr. Cotton's research concerns the clinical epidemiology of AIDS. Dr. Cotton is a nationally recognized authority on AIDS in women. She is co-editor of the recently published textbook The Medical Management of AIDS in Women with Heather Watts, M.D., and a member of the editorial board of the Journal of Women's Health. Dr. Cotton served as a member and then chairman of the FDA's Antiviral Advisory Committee, from 1989 to 1994, and chaired the meeting of the committee at which approval of zidovudine to prevent perinatal transmission of HIV was recommended. Dr. Cotton currently serves on the Advisory Council of the NIH Office of AIDS Research and is a member of the IOM Board on Health Sciences. Susan Cu-Uvin, M.D., is assistant professor of obstetrics and gynecology (research) at Brown University. She provides primary care and obstetric-gynecologic care to HIV-infected women at the Immunology Center, the Miriam Hospital, Providence, Rhode Island. Her research activities focus on HIV shedding in the genital tract of women and its relevance to heterosexual and mother-to-infant transmission. Dr. Cu-Uvin graduated from the University of the Philippines College of Medicine and finished a residency in obstetrics and gynecology. She completed three-year fellowship in HIV/AIDS at The Miriam Hospital, Brown University, and became an attending physician in immunology and geographic medicine.

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--> Nancy Kass, Sc.D., is associate professor and director of the Program in Law, Ethics, and Health, Johns Hopkins School of Public Health, and senior faculty in the Bioethics Institute, Johns Hopkins University. She also is a fellow of the Kennedy Institute of Ethics, Georgetown University. She received her B.A. from Stanford University, completed doctoral training in health policy from the Johns Hopkins School of Public Health, and was awarded a National Research Service Award to complete a postdoctoral fellowship in bioethics at the Kennedy Institute of Ethics, Georgetown University. Dr. Kass conducts empirical work in bioethics and health policy. Her publications are primarily in the fields of HIV/AIDS policy, genetics policy, and research ethics. She is coeditor (with Ruth Faden) of HIV, AIDS and Childbearing: Public Policy, Private Lives (Oxford University Press, 1996). She served as consultant to the President's Advisory Committee on Human Radiation Experiments from 1994 to 1995 and currently is vice-chair of the Johns Hopkins School of Public Health Institutional Review Board. Patricia King, J.D., is the Carmack Waterhouse Professor of Law, Medicine, Ethics, and Public Policy at the Georgetown University Law Center. She is a senior research fellow with the Kennedy Institute of Ethics. She is a member of the Institute of Medicine Council. She has served on several NRC and IOM committees, including the Commission on Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education (1992–1995), the IOM Committee to Study the Social and Ethical Impact of Biomedicine (1992–1994), the IOM Committee on Assessing Genetic Risks (1991–1993), and the IOM Board on Health and Science Policy (1989–1994). King has served as deputy assistant attorney general, Civil Division, of the U.S. Department of Justice; and as deputy director of the Office of Civil Rights, U.S. Department of Health, Education, and Welfare. She has a J.D. from Harvard Law School and a B.A. from Wheaton College. Lorraine V. Klerman, Dr.P.H., Is Professor of the Department of Maternal and Child Health, School of Public Health, University of Alabama at Birmingham. She also holds appointments in the Department of Pediatrics, the Civitan International Research Center, and the Lister Hill Policy Center. She is a health services researcher with particular interest in health delivery systems for economically deprived women and children. She is the author of Alive and Well? A Research and Policy Review of Health Programs for Poor Young Children, and numerous journal articles and book chapters on poverty, adolescent pregnancy, school absence, and related subjects. She is a graduate of Cornell University and the Harvard School of Public Health. In 1996, she received the American Public Health Association's Martha May Eliot Award for exceptional health services to mothers and children. Katherine Luzuriaga, M.D., graduated from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (S.B. in applied biology and M.S. in nutritional biochemistry) and the

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--> Tufts University School of Medicine (M.D.). After a research fellowship in infectious diseases at the University of Massachusetts Medical School, Dr. Luzuriaga joined the faculty there and is currently associate professor of pediatrics. Dr. Luzuriaga's research activities have focused on understanding the viral and immunopathogenesis of early vertical HIV-1 infection. She has also been active in the development of antiretroviral therapies for children through the Pediatric AIDS Clinical Trials Group. Dr. Luzuriaga is a 1997 recipient of the Elizabeth Glaser Scientist Award from the Pediatric AIDS Foundation. Ellen J. Mangione, M.D., M.P.H., is director of the Disease Control and Environmental Epidemiology Division of the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment. She received a B.A. from Smith College; has an M.D. from the College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University; and has an M.P.H. from the University of California, Berkeley. She completed her training in internal medicine at the Boston University Medical Center and a fellowship in infectious diseases at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center (UCHSC). She is a graduate of the Epidemic Intelligence Service and the Preventive Medicine Residency of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Public Health Service. She is board-certified in internal medicine, public health, and general preventive medicine, as well as infectious diseases. She is an assistant clinical professor in the Infectious Disease Division and the Department of Preventive Medicine and Biometrics, UCHSC. Dr. Mangione has been a consultant to the Office of Technology Assessment and is a member of an Environmental Protection Agency Science Advisory Committee. She has been involved in disease control projects in Liberia, Burkina Faso, and North Yemen. In addition to a strong interest in environmental epidemiology and international health, she has responsibility for statewide disease control activities in Colorado, including tuberculosis, immunization, and STD/HIV control and surveillance programs. Douglas Morgan, M.P.A.,* is assistant commissioner, Division of AIDS Prevention and Control, New Jersey Department of Health and Senior Services. He received his undergraduate degree, a B.A. in chemistry, from Rutgers, the State University, Newark, New Jersey, and his masters in public administration from New York University. From 1989 to 1990, he was executive director of the Minority Health Institute, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey. He was formerly assistant secretary for medical care programs with the Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene. He is a member and former chair of the National Alliance of State and Territorial Directors. He serves on the U.S. CDC's Advisory Committee for HIV/STD Prevention and the Columbia School of Public Health's Advisory Committee for the Public Health Community Scholars *   Resigned from the committee on April 20, 1998.

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--> Program. On April 1998, he accepted a position with the Division of Service Systems, HIV/AIDS Bureau, Health Resources and Services Administration. Stephen B. Thomas, Ph.D., graduated from the Ohio State University (B.S. in health education), Illinois State University (M.S. in community health), and Southern Illinois University (Ph.D., in community health). Currently he is a tenured associate professor of community health in the Department of Behavioral Sciences and Health Education, and director of the Institute for Minority Health Research at the Rollins School of Public Health of Emory University in Atlanta. From 1986 to 1993, he was on the faculty of the Department of Health Education at the University of Maryland in College Park. His research is focused on community-based interventions to prevent AIDS, substance abuse, and violence among racial and ethnic minority populations. He has written extensively on the social construction of AIDS in the African-American community. He represented Emory University at the White House for the Presidential Apology to Survivors of the Syphilis Study at Tuskegee. He has served as evaluation consultant to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, the Walter Reed Army Institute of Research, the Baltimore County Public School System, the United Methodist Church Office of the Resident Bishop, Kaiser Permanente, and numerous community-based organizations serving minority populations. He has given testimony before the Presidential Commission on HIV and Senator Paul Coverdale's Commission on Drug Interdiction. He has served as a legislative intern for Senator Paul Simon. He was a consultant to the IOM-NAS Study Committee on Preventing HIV Transmission: The Role of Sterile Needles and Bleach. He currently serves on the editorial boards of Health Education and Behavior and the Journal of Health Education. At Emory University he is on the Board of Directors for the Center for Ethics in Public Policy and the Professions. Dr. Thomas believes that we must become more skilled in the use of community-based social change strategies as a primary means to advance health promotion and disease prevention programs that are scientifically sound, ethnically acceptable, and culturally competent. Sten H. Vermund, M.D., Ph.D., is professor of epidemiology, medicine, and pediatrics at the University of Alabama at Birmingham. He also serves as Director, of the Division of Geographic Medicine. His training is from Stanford University (human biology), Albert Einstein College of Medicine (medicine), Columbia University (pediatrics and epidemiology), and the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine (tropical public health). From 1988–1994, he served as the chief of the Vaccine Trials and Epidemiology Branch in the Division of AIDS at NIAID where he helped launch initiatives in perinatal transmission prevention, women's health, and prevention clinical trials. His current research activities include the natural history of HIV among adolescents; STD control and HIV prevention in high-risk but low-HIV-prevalence areas of Asia,

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--> Central America, and the Caribbean; HIV prevention studies in Zambia; clinical epidemiology of HIV in Alabama; molecular epidemiology of Pneumocystis carinii; and several non-AIDS infectious disease epidemiology projects including the study of bacterial vaginosis and early preterm birth. Dr. Vermund serves on the Prevention Research Advisory Committee for the Office of AIDS Research at NIH, on the Centers and Programs Scientific Review Committee of the National Institute on Drug Abuse, and as a scientific adviser to the Pediatric AIDS Foundation, the Catalonia Ministry of Health AIDS Research Institute, the Center for Urban Epidemiologic Studies of the New York Academy of Medicine, and the Columbia University Center for AIDS Research. Liaison To The Board On Health Promotion And Disease Prevention Robert Fullilove, Ed.D., is currently the associate dean for community and minority affairs at Columbia University's School of Public Health. He is also an associate professor of clinical public health and co-director of the Community Research Group at the New York State Psychiatric Institute. Prior to joining the Faculty of Medicine at Columbia, Dr. Fullilove was the assistant director of multicultural inquiry at the University of California, San Francisco, and the Bayview Hunters Point Foundation, which was headed by his wife, Dr. Mindy Fullilove. The Fulliloves have made numerous presentations on HIV disease among people of color and have published extensively. Their research encompasses a wide range of topics including crack cocaine use and sexually transmitted disease in the AIDS era; trauma-related disorders and their impact on sexual risk taking; and science, mathematics, and medical education for African Americans and other students of color. Dr. Robert Fullilove received his B.A. from Colgate University (1966), his M.S. from Syracuse University (1972), and his Ed.D. from Columbia University (1984). Since 1995, he has served on the IOM's Board of Health Promotion and Disease Prevention. Since 1997, he has served as a member-nominee to the CDC's Advisory Committee on HIV and STD Prevention. He is also a widely exhibited painter and a self-described ''francophile." Staff Michael A. Stoto, Ph.D., is a senior staff officer of the Institute of Medicine, and was formerly the director of the Division of Health Promotion and Disease Prevention. Dr. Stoto directed the IOM's effort in support of the U.S. Public Health Service's Healthy People 2000 project and has worked on IOM projects addressing a number of issues in public health, health statistics, health promotion and disease prevention, vaccine safety and policy, environmental health, and AIDS. Dr. Stoto led the staff responsible for the reports Veterans and Agent Orange:

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--> Health Effects of Herbicides Used in Vietnam; HIV and the Blood Supply: An Analysis of Crisis Decision making; Healthy Communities: New Directions for the Future of Public Health; and Improving Health in the Community: A Role for Performance Monitoring. Dr. Stoto received an A.B. in statistics from Princeton University and a Ph.D. in statistics and demography from Harvard University, and was formerly an associate professor of public policy at Harvard's John F. Kennedy School of Government. He is an adjunct associate professor of biostatistics at the Harvard School of Public Health and, at the completion of the perinatal transmission project, will become professor and chair of the Department of Epidemiology and Biostatisics at the George Washington University School of Public Health and Health Services. Donna A. Almario, B.A., is the project and research assistant on the perinatal transmission of HIV study. Ms. Almario joined the Division of Health Promotion and Disease prevention in October 1997. Prior to joining the Institute of Medicine, she worked as a research assistant studying breast cancer at Georgetown University Medical Center's Lombardi Cancer Center. Ms. Almario graduated from Vassar College with a biopsychology degree in May 1996.