Division of HIV/AIDS Prevention18

Located in the National Center for HIV, STD, and TB Prevention, the division has 65 cooperative agreements (CAs), totaling $250 million, with all states, territories, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico, and with six cities (New York City, Houston, Chicago, San Francisco, Los Angeles, and Philadelphia). These projects fund 10,000 counseling and testing sites. Part I of the CA provides funds for counseling, testing, referral, and partner notification; Part II supports health education and risk reduction, including street and community outreach, risk reduction counseling, prevention case management and linkage to other services, and community-level intervention to change perceptions of risk. The CAs require a community planning process whereby health departments, affected communities, providers, and scientists get together to plan the health department's application to the CDC.

In addition to cooperative agreements with states, the CDC offers competitive funding grants and demonstration grants. Examples of these vehicles are: (1) 20–40 grants to minority organizations within communities to provide services to meet unmet needs related to HIV/AIDS; and (2) 5–6 demonstration project grants to health departments that emphasize prevention and linkage to care with a particular focus on reducing perinatal transmission.

Division of STD Prevention19

Located in the National Center for HIV, STD, and TB Prevention, this division has 65 funded projects totaling $80 million dollars, with all states, territories, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, and with six cities (New York City, Chicago, Los Angeles, Philadelphia, San Francisco, and Baltimore). These projects fund 3,000 STD clinics, most of which are located in state and local public health departments. Other sites include some family planning clinics and hospitals. These clinics are the primary source of HIV testing in public facilities, although the population using these clinics is primarily male, poor, uninsured, and experiencing symptoms of an STD. Every patient using clinic services gets pre- and post-test counseling for HIV and education concerning safe sex practices. Because of the demand for services, most of the effort in providing follow-up involved those who test positive; 82% of those who test positive are brought back for follow-up.

There are three sources of funding for STD clinics: (1) CDC funds can be used for management, consultation, technical assistance, some staff, and travel;

18  

Information provided by the Division of HIV/AIDS Prevention, CDC.

19  

Information provided by the Division of STD Prevention, CDC.



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