Appendix B Biographical Sketches of Committee Members

Francis G. Dwyer, NAE, chair, earned his B.S. in chemical engineering from Villanova University and his M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in chemical engineering from the University of Pennsylvania. He retired in 1993 from Mobil Research and Development Corporation as a senior scientist and the manager of the Catalyst Research and Development Section. His wide range of experience with a variety of petroleum and petrochemical research, development, and manufacturing issues includes the development of the first zeolite containing cracking catalysts; a family of catalysts for a wide spectrum of applications; the Mobil/Badger Ethylbenzene Process (a heterogeneous nonpolluting process used in the manufacture of styrene worldwide); and pollution abatement catalysts.

Jerome S. Schultz, NAE, vice chair, earned his B.S. and M.S. degrees in chemical engineering from Columbia University and a Ph.D. in biochemistry from the University of Wisconsin. He is the director of the Center for Biotechnology and Bioengineering at the University of Pittsburgh. Dr. Schultz is a renowned expert in the field of biosensors, including biorecognition functions, bioreceptors, and synthetic membranes.

Klaus Biemann, NAS, earned a Ph.D. in organic chemistry from the University of Innsbruck. He recently retired as a professor of chemistry at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology where he taught since 1957. His research interests have included the structure and synthesis of natural products and the development of mass spectrometric techniques, especially in combination with gas chromatography, also the identification of combustion products of fossil fuels, the correlation of DNA sequence and protein structure, and protein sequencing by high-performance, tandem mass spectrometry.

Harold S. Blackman earned his B.A.E. in secondary education, with a major in biological science and his M.S. and Ph.D. in educational psychology



The National Academies | 500 Fifth St. N.W. | Washington, D.C. 20001
Copyright © National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.
Terms of Use and Privacy Statement



Below are the first 10 and last 10 pages of uncorrected machine-read text (when available) of this chapter, followed by the top 30 algorithmically extracted key phrases from the chapter as a whole.
Intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text on the opening pages of each chapter. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

Do not use for reproduction, copying, pasting, or reading; exclusively for search engines.

OCR for page 85
--> Appendix B Biographical Sketches of Committee Members Francis G. Dwyer, NAE, chair, earned his B.S. in chemical engineering from Villanova University and his M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in chemical engineering from the University of Pennsylvania. He retired in 1993 from Mobil Research and Development Corporation as a senior scientist and the manager of the Catalyst Research and Development Section. His wide range of experience with a variety of petroleum and petrochemical research, development, and manufacturing issues includes the development of the first zeolite containing cracking catalysts; a family of catalysts for a wide spectrum of applications; the Mobil/Badger Ethylbenzene Process (a heterogeneous nonpolluting process used in the manufacture of styrene worldwide); and pollution abatement catalysts. Jerome S. Schultz, NAE, vice chair, earned his B.S. and M.S. degrees in chemical engineering from Columbia University and a Ph.D. in biochemistry from the University of Wisconsin. He is the director of the Center for Biotechnology and Bioengineering at the University of Pittsburgh. Dr. Schultz is a renowned expert in the field of biosensors, including biorecognition functions, bioreceptors, and synthetic membranes. Klaus Biemann, NAS, earned a Ph.D. in organic chemistry from the University of Innsbruck. He recently retired as a professor of chemistry at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology where he taught since 1957. His research interests have included the structure and synthesis of natural products and the development of mass spectrometric techniques, especially in combination with gas chromatography, also the identification of combustion products of fossil fuels, the correlation of DNA sequence and protein structure, and protein sequencing by high-performance, tandem mass spectrometry. Harold S. Blackman earned his B.A.E. in secondary education, with a major in biological science and his M.S. and Ph.D. in educational psychology

OCR for page 85
--> from Arizona State University. Dr. Blackman is currently manager of the Engineering Analysis Department at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. He has specialized in quantitative methods and research methodology, as applied in psychology, engineering, and education. Most recently his research has been in the assessment of human error and cognition as it relates to complex human performance. Barbara G. Callahan earned her A.B. in biology/chemistry from Emmanuel College, her M.S. in biology from Rivier College, and her Ph.D. in toxicology from Northeastern University. She is currently director of Fluor Daniel GTI Risk Assessment Services. Dr. Callahan has performed evaluations of sites contaminated with pesticides, PCBs, heavy metals, and PAHS. She is also a member of several national committees that study the effects of acute exposure to toxicants on human health after accidental release under emergency conditions. She has been awarded the U.S. Army Environmental Hygiene Agency Commander's Medallion. Sanford S. Leffingwell earned his A.B. from Harvard University, his M.P.H. from The Johns Hopkins School of Hygiene and Public Health, and his M.D. from the University of Colorado School of Medicine. Following a career with the U.S. Public Health Service, he became a consultant and instructor for HLM Consultants, where he works on occupational and environmental clinical, health, and safety issues. Derek L. Ransley is currently president of Ransley & Associates in Lafayette, California. From 1962 to 1996, he worked at the Chevron research and development organization. He received his B.Sc. in chemistry from the University of Wales and his M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in organic chemistry from Yale University. He is currently a consultant on benchmarking and best practices related to technology and technology management. Ludwig Rebenfeld earned his B.S. in chemistry from the University of Lowell and his Ph.D. in chemistry from Princeton University. He is currently president emeritus and research associate of the Textile Research Institute. He has been a lecturer with the rank of professor at Princeton University since 1971 and is currently the editor of Textile Research Journal. He previously served as chairman of the Advisory Board on Military Personnel Supplies and is a past member of the National Research Council Board on Army Science and Technology. William G. Reifenrath received his B.S. degree in chemistry from the University of Nebraska and continued at the College of Pharmacy to earn

OCR for page 85
--> a Ph.D. in medicinal chemistry. He is presently a research chemist at the University of California at Berkeley and also directs Reifenrath Consulting and Research, a contract research company specializing in skin toxicology and pharmacology. Jack Throck Watson earned his B.S. in chemistry from Iowa State University and his Ph.D. in analytical chemistry from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He is a professor of biochemistry at Michigan State University and a principal investigator at the Michigan State University Mass Spectrometry Facility. His research interests include the study of a wide variety of proteins by mass spectrometry, as well as application of state-of-the-art methodologies and advancements in the field of mass spectrometry.