Appendix C
Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff

EDWARD J. BOUWER is a professor of environmental engineering at the Johns Hopkins University. His research interests include biodegradation of hazardous organic chemicals in the subsurface, biofilm kinetics, water and waste treatment processes, and transport and fate of bacteria in porous media. He is on the Research Advisory Council for the American Water Works Association Research Foundation, the editorial boards of the Journal of Contaminant Hydrology and Environmental Engineering Science, and the managing editorial board for Biodegradation. He received a Ph.D. in environmental engineering and science from Stanford University in 1982. Dr. Bouwer has served on several NRC committees, including the U.S. National Committee for SCOPE, the Steering Committee on Building Environmental Management Science Programs, and the Committee on Groundwater Cleanup Alternatives.

GENE F. PARKIN is a professor of civil and environmental engineering at the University of Iowa, where he was chairman from 1990 to 1995. He earned a B.S. and an M.S. in civil engineering from the University of Iowa and a Ph.D. from Stanford University. His teaching interests include biological wastewater treatment, environmental chemistry, and remediation of hazardous wastes. He has conducted research in bioremediation, the fate and effects of toxic chemicals (including metals) in the subsurface and above-ground treatment systems, anaerobic biological treatment, and biological nitrogen removal. In 1989, Dr. Parkin was awarded the Hancher-Finkbine Medallion for Outstanding Professor at the University of Iowa. He recently published the fourth edition of Chemistry for Environmental Engineering with Perry McCarty. He serves as the director of the Center for Health Effects of Environmental Contamination at the University of Iowa. He is a registered professional engineer in Iowa.



The National Academies | 500 Fifth St. N.W. | Washington, D.C. 20001
Copyright © National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.
Terms of Use and Privacy Statement



Below are the first 10 and last 10 pages of uncorrected machine-read text (when available) of this chapter, followed by the top 30 algorithmically extracted key phrases from the chapter as a whole.
Intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text on the opening pages of each chapter. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

Do not use for reproduction, copying, pasting, or reading; exclusively for search engines.

OCR for page 139
--> Appendix C Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff EDWARD J. BOUWER is a professor of environmental engineering at the Johns Hopkins University. His research interests include biodegradation of hazardous organic chemicals in the subsurface, biofilm kinetics, water and waste treatment processes, and transport and fate of bacteria in porous media. He is on the Research Advisory Council for the American Water Works Association Research Foundation, the editorial boards of the Journal of Contaminant Hydrology and Environmental Engineering Science, and the managing editorial board for Biodegradation. He received a Ph.D. in environmental engineering and science from Stanford University in 1982. Dr. Bouwer has served on several NRC committees, including the U.S. National Committee for SCOPE, the Steering Committee on Building Environmental Management Science Programs, and the Committee on Groundwater Cleanup Alternatives. GENE F. PARKIN is a professor of civil and environmental engineering at the University of Iowa, where he was chairman from 1990 to 1995. He earned a B.S. and an M.S. in civil engineering from the University of Iowa and a Ph.D. from Stanford University. His teaching interests include biological wastewater treatment, environmental chemistry, and remediation of hazardous wastes. He has conducted research in bioremediation, the fate and effects of toxic chemicals (including metals) in the subsurface and above-ground treatment systems, anaerobic biological treatment, and biological nitrogen removal. In 1989, Dr. Parkin was awarded the Hancher-Finkbine Medallion for Outstanding Professor at the University of Iowa. He recently published the fourth edition of Chemistry for Environmental Engineering with Perry McCarty. He serves as the director of the Center for Health Effects of Environmental Contamination at the University of Iowa. He is a registered professional engineer in Iowa.

OCR for page 139
--> MICHAEL J. BARCELONA is a research professor in civil and environmental engineering and director of operations at the National Center for Integrated Bioremediation Research and Development at the University of Michigan. He received his Ph.D. in marine chemistry and chemical oceanography from the University of Puerto Rico in 1977. His research focuses on developing methods for estimating the distribution, speciation, and transformation potential of contaminants in sedimentary and aquatic geochemical environments, with particular emphasis in the development of improved analytical and statistical interpretative tools for remediation technology performance measures. Since 1992, he has been editor of Ground Water Monitoring and Remediation. LAWRENCE W. BARNTHOUSE is president of LWB Environmental Sciences, Inc. He was formerly a principal scientist in the ChemRisk division of McLaren/Hart, Inc. and manager of the ChemRisk office in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. As a senior research staff member in Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Environmental Sciences Division, he was involved in dozens of environmental research and assessment projects involving development of new methods for predicting and measuring environmental risks of energy technologies. He has authored and co-authored more than 70 publications on ecological risk assessment, covering such topics as population modeling techniques and problems involving cooling systems, toxic chemicals, and watershed management. He has served on numerous NRC committees and was a recent member of the Board on Environmental Studies and Toxicology. Dr. Barnthouse received his Ph.D. in biology from the University of Chicago in 1976. JOHN C. CHAMBERS is a partner with the law firm of Arent, Fox, Kintner, Plotkin, & Kahn in Washington, D.C. His practice involves litigation, counseling, and lobbying on such environmental issues as hazardous waste management, remediation, recycling and corrective action; Clean Air Act permitting; and environmental justice. Mr. Chambers frequently lectures at environmental forums and appears as a television and radio commentator. He was featured in the 1994 International Corporate Law Magazine's "Guide to Leading Environmental Lawyers." Mr. Chambers is also founder of the Brownfields Business Information Network and currently serves as the president of the Washington Government Relations Group. He received his B.A. from the University of Pennsylvania and his J.D. from the Washington College of Law, American University. FRANCIS H. CHAPELLE is a research hydrologist at the U.S. Geological Survey in Columbia, South Carolina. He received a Ph.D. in geology in 1984 from George Washington University. He also holds a B.A. in music and a B.S. in geology from the University of Maryland. His research interests focus on the impact of microbial processes on ground-water chemistry in contaminated and pristine environments. He is the author of Ground-Water Microbiology and Geochemistry,

OCR for page 139
--> a textbook that explains how microorganisms affect ground-water chemistry, and The Hidden Sea, a book describing ground-water systems and ground-water contaminants throughout the United States. Dr. Chapelle was a member of the NRC Committee on In Situ Bioremediation. NEIL R. GARRETT is currently a project environmental analyst supervisor with the Oklahoma Corporation Commission, where he has worked since 1994. His duties include regulating the investigation, risk assessment, and remediation of chemical (mostly fuel) releases from underground storage tanks. He has helped to implement risk-based corrective action at all commission-regulated facilities in Oklahoma. He has previously been a hydrogeologist at environmental consulting firms, and RCRA-related investigations have taken him to several states. Previous petroleum-related work has been conducted in the south-central United States, Gulf of Mexico, and the Persian Gulf. Mr. Garrett received his B.S. in geology from the University of Oklahoma, his M.Ed. from the University of Central Oklahoma, and a Hydrogeology Certificate from Oklahoma State University. FRANKLIN W. SCHWARTZ received his Ph.D. in geology in 1972 from the University of Illinois. He is currently the Ohio eminent scholar in hydrogeology at Ohio State University. His research interests concern contaminant transport in mixed convective systems and oxidation schemes for DNAPL remediation. Dr. Schwartz has been an active consultant to government and private industry since 1972, with most of his work involving project management, report review, technical advice, development and application of computer models, and field investigations. He is an editor-in-chief of the Journal of Contaminant Hydrology and co-author of the textbook Physical and Chemical Hydrogeology. He has served on several NRC committees and is a former member of the Water Science and Technology Board. LENNY M. SIEGEL is the director of the Center for Public Environmental Oversight, a project of San Francisco State University's Urban Institute. He has been director of the Pacific Studies Center since 1970. He is one of the environmental movement's leading experts on military base contamination and has worked as a consultant to a wide range of organizations. Mr. Siegel is or was recently a member of several government advisory committees, including the Defense Science Board Task Force on Unexploded Ordnance, the Federal Facilities Environment Restoration Dialogue Committee, the Subcommittee on Waste and Facility Siting of the National Environmental Justice Advisory Committee, the Peer Review Panel for the VOC Historical Case Initiative, and the Moffett Field Restoration Advisory Board. Mr. Siegel edits the Citizens Report on the Military and the Environment, and his organization runs Internet forums on military environmental issues and Brownfields. ALICE D. STARK is the director of the Bureau of Environmental and Occupational Epidemiology at the New York State Department of Health. She has conducted

OCR for page 139
--> health assessments in populations exposed to toxic substances from hazardous waste sites and other sources of environmental exposure. Dr. Stark is also an adjunct professor of anthropology at State University of New York, Albany, where she was formerly an associate professor of environmental health and toxicology and epidemiology. Dr. Stark is conducting a follow-up health study at Love Canal and a Farm Family Health and Hazard Survey. She is a member of the Board of Scientific Counselors, Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registries. She has recently served on two National Cancer Institute committees, one of which investigated the role of xenobiotic chemicals in causing cancer. She received her B. S. in chemistry from the City College of New York and her MPH and Ph.D., from Yale University in environmental epidemiology. SAMUEL J. TRAINA is a professor of soil physical chemistry at Ohio State University. His research is focused on surface, colloidal, and complexation chemistry in soils, and includes studying the chemical fate of organic and inorganic contaminants in soils, sediments, and aquifer materials. Recent work has examined the chemical speciation and bioavailability of lead in soil, the reactions of organic bases with clay minerals, the geochemistry of arsenic and chromium in hyperalkaline environments, and biotic and abiotic transformations of chlorinated pesticides in soils and sedimentary environments. Dr. Traina received his Ph.D. from the University of California at Berkeley in soil chemistry in 1983 and has been a faculty member at OSU since 1985. ALBERT J. VALOCCHI is a professor in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at the University of Illinois, where he has taught since 1981. His research interests include modeling fate and transport of reactive contaminants in the subsurface and mathematical modeling applications in environmental and hydrological sciences. Several research projects reflecting those interests are currently being conducted in his lab, including numerical simulation of reactive transport at Yucca Mountain, transport of complex mixtures of radionuclides and organics, and a stochastic analysis of reactive transport in heterogeneous aquifers. Dr. Valocchi is an associate editor of the Journal of Contaminant Hydrology and the American Society of Chemical Engineers Journal of Hydrologic Engineering. He received his Ph.D. in civil engineering from Stanford University in 1981. BRIAN J. WAGNER is a research hydrologist in the U.S. Geological Survey's National Research Program. His research interests include data network design for environmental monitoring and assessment, experimental design for understanding contaminant fate and transport, and optimization and decision analysis for water resources management. He received a B.S. in civil engineering from Drexel University and an M.S. and Ph.D. in applied hydrology from Stanford University.

OCR for page 139
--> Dr. Wagner was a member of the National Research Council's Committee on Innovative Remediation Technologies. CLAIRE WELTY is associate professor of civil and environmental engineering at Drexel University. Her research interests broadly include development and application of mathematical models to predict groundwater flow and solute transport in aquifers. Her current research interests focus on using a stochastic approach to predict virus transport through aquifers; interpretation of observations of density-coupled transport; and prediction of contaminant transport in fractured rock aquifers. Dr. Welty is also involved in establishing a porous media observational facility at the University of Kassel in Germany. She is an associate editor of Water Resources Research and served as the 1996–1998 chair of the American Geophysical Union's Groundwater Committee. Dr. Welty received her Ph.D. in civil engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1989. Prior to graduate school, she was an environmental scientist in the Hazardous and Industrial Waste Division at U.S. EPA. JEFFREY J. WONG is chief of the Human and Ecological Risk Division of the California Environmental Protection Agency. He is responsible for (1) assessment of public health and environmental effects due to exposure to hazardous materials, (2) development and formulation of risk management and reduction strategies, and (3) analysis of policy implications of risk control options. Dr. Wong received his Ph.D. in pharmacology and toxicology from the University of California, Davis, in 1981. He currently teaches undergraduate courses in environmental toxicology and risk assessment modeling at UC Davis, and he has conducted short courses on similar topics for environmental professionals. He was a member of the NRC Committee on Remedial Action Priorities for Hazardous Waste Sites. LAURA J. EHLERS is a staff officer of the National Research Council's Water Science and Technology Board and the study director for this report. She is also the study director for the Committee to Review the New York City Watershed Management Strategy. In 1998, she received a Certificate of Appreciation for Outstanding Service from the Commission on Geosciences, Environment, and Resources of the National Research Council. Dr. Ehlers received her B.S. in biology and engineering and applied science from the California Institute of Technology and her M.S.E. and Ph.D. degrees in environmental engineering from the Johns Hopkins University. KIMBERLY A. SWARTZ is a project assistant with the National Research Council's Water Science and Technology Board. She assisted the staff and committee in producing the final draft of this report. She has a B.S. in sociology from Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University.

OCR for page 139
This page in the original is blank.