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OCR for page 502
In-house maintenance is perceived as a Darner, even Coup few junsdictions have transidoned to advanced communications technology. Thus, this perceived banner is supported by limited understanding of advanced technology, myths created by conventional technology's marketing, and, perhaps, human nature's '~fear of the unmown." In fact, transition from conventional technology to advanced fiber optic technology has been wed accommodated by existing maintenance staffs, when attention is given to transitional Gaining and test equipment updates. A.5.2 Procurement Policy Procurement policy impacts, not only He ability of junsdicdons to responsibly obtain professional consulting assistance when needed, but also Me ability to procure advanced communications technology compared with conventional technology. Progressive jurisdictions are changing procurement practices, allowing high technology to be procured by mesons over Tan invention to bid (~) and by crated over Ban low price. But many jurisdictions continue to procure high technology by the same methods used to procure concrete for road surfacing, for example. Table A.5.2-1 presents an overview of alternate procurement techniques available for consideration. Unfortunately, Be alternate techniques may be used only if they are Included within Be procurement policy and procedures of Be juIisdiction's contracting authority. Advanced procurement approaches require considerably more time and technical capabilities by junsdicdons. If Be jurisdiction does not have technical skills to prepare a request for proposal (RFP), and assist in proposal evaluation, Ten professional consuldng services must be obtained, which fiercer delays procurements. Thus, limited technical skins when a jurisdiction can bias Be memos of procurement, increasing Be likelihood that procurement ivy] become a barrier to acquiring advanced technology. Establishment of a task order contract wad a professional consuldng company Tat has communications professionals eliminates the Internal technical skins battier. One concept that has arisen in ITS procurement is that of design/build, using a one-step or two- step REP. The problem troth design/build contracting as it has evolved, is Rat details are limited in Be procurement specification to provide a legal basis for requirements within L:`NCHIWha~' NCHRP 3-51 Phase 2 Fmal Report ASH

OCR for page 502
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OCR for page 502
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