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Section 1 - Statewide Planning BIBL]:OGRAPHIC REFERENCES FROM THE NCHRP 8~32 INTERACTIVE DATABASE CONCERNING STATEWIDE MULTIMODAL PLANNING ISSUES 1-1. 2020 Florida Transportation Plan. Florida Department of Transportation. Mar 1995. Florida. 1-2. ACCESS OHIO, Macro Phase. Ohio Department of Transportation. Oct 1993. ACCESS OHIO establishes the state's long-range transportation plan. It articulates the mission, goals, policies and actions which ~11 guide the Ohio Department of Transportation's efforts to develop the efficient, intermodal network Ohio needs for the 21st Century. This plan results from unprecedented public involvement. More than 3,500 Ohioans at 71 meetings described what they want from a transportation system. In addition, ACCESS OHIO reflects the state's response to local, state and federal demands for a transportation system that is safe, globally competitive, energy efficient and environmentally compatible. ACCESS OHIO identifies critical intermodal corridors. These corridors represent the economic arteries which transfer Ohio people and products to the rest of the nation, and the world. They were chosen by criteria which were statistically valid and regionally balanced. Establishing these corridors does not mean that Ohio ~11 ignore regionally significant routes but it allows the state to prioritize its statewide investment strategies. The next phase of ACCESS OHIO will identify the regionally significant routes. ACCESS OHIO is not a technical report intended to produce a list of highway construction projects. Although a technical analysis was used to identify the major corridors, this report was not intended to analyze sections of highway to identify improvement needs. Instead, this report identifies overall strategies and actions for O DOT to provide the intermodal transportation system Ohio needs for the next century. ACCESS OHIO establishes a vision for the Ohio Department of Transportation. This vision is to be a customer~nven transportation agency which coordinates a seamless network of modes. Each mode is optimized to take advantage of the role it offers in satisfying personal mobility, economic competitiveness, environmental compatibility and safety. This vision is captured in the O DOT Mission Statement. Ohio. 1-3. Alaska Intermodal Transportation Plan. Alaska Department of Transportation and Public Facilities. Moving people and goods within a intermodal transportation system in an economic, efficient and environmentally sound manner is vitally important to this nation. By attaining an efficient transportation network, 1 the economy of the United States is strengthened and can more effectively contribute to the global economy (Intermodal Surface Transportation and Efficiency Act, 1991~. Toward this end, the State of Alaska, under management of the Alaska Department of Transportation and Public Facilities (DOT&PF), has prepared the "Alaska Intermodal Transportation Plan." Alaska's plan is one of the first efforts in the nation to analyze all modes of travel in a statewide transportation system and to recommend strategies for improving that system based on inter-nodal transportation goals and objectives. The plan describes the physical, political, economic, and technological characteristics of Alaska's current transportation network. It contrasts Alaska's transportation system with the transportation system in the remainder of the country to form the basis for identifying Alaska's needs. Providing and developing a transportation network for this state of extremes has necessitated an intermodal approach. Thus, Alaska's transportation system relies on all modes of transportation to form its network. Tasked with the operation, maintenance, and improvement of virtually all public transportation facilities in Alaska, DOT&PPs responsibility includes maintenance and operation of Alaska National Highway System components and the Alaska Marine Highway System; operation of the Anchorage and Fairbanks International Airports; design and construction for all major transportation capital projects and most of the state's public facilities; and transportation system planning. DOT&PF is also responsible for the operation and maintenance of over 300 short gravel airstrips and one-lane pioneer roads that often comprise the entire surface transportation system for rural villages. Alaska. 1-4. Alaska State Transportation Policy Plan. Tomorrow's Alaska: Transportation for the Twenty-First Centurya Strategic Management, Planning and Policy, Department of Transportation and Public Facilities. Dec 1991. Alaska. 1-5. Alternatives For the Future: Developing a Transportation Plan That Responds To the Disparate Goals of a Booming Region. Binkley, Lisa S. (Wisconsin Department of Transportation, Madison, Wl). Submitted to Transportation Planning Methods Applications Conference, Apr 17 1995, Seattle, Washington. Wisconsin.

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Project Bibliography- NCHRP 8-32 1-6. Annual Report to the Legislative Transportation Committee. 1994-t995 Activities and Expenditures for Transportation Improvement Board Programs. State of Washington Transportation Improvement Board. Washington. 1-7. Assessing State Departments of Transportation Economic Development Practices: A Regional Perspective. Perkins, Judy A. and Ibibia K. Dabipi. (Southern University, Baton ROUGH, LA). Submitted to Transportation Planning Methods Applications Conference, Apr 17 1995, Seattle, Washington. 1-8. Beginning the Process for Implementing the Intermodal Surface Transportation Efficiency Act of 1991. A Summary of the Northstar Workshop. Sponsored by the Minnesota Department of Transportation. May 27 1992. Minnesota. 1-9. California Intermodal Transportation Management System (ITMS): Background Information. Boyle, Ed. (California Department of Transportation, Sacramento, CA). National Conference on Intermodalism: Making the Case, Making it Happen, Dec 7 1994, New Orleans, Louisiana. This project will present the shape and purpose of the California Intermodal Transportation Management System (ITMS) including its development process, program and system components, performance measures, and application. Califomia. 1-1 O. California Transportation Commission 1993 Annual Report to California Legislature. Volume 11: Status of Implementing State Transportation Blueprint and Proposition 116 and Other Commission Policies and Actions. California Transportation Commission. (Sacramento, CA).Dec151993. This second volume of the California Transportation Commission's 1993 annual report summarizes programming issues and other actions taken by the Commission during 1993. The issues and actions can be summarized in the following broad categories: implementation of the Transportation Blueprint for the Twenty-First Century; implementation of Proposition 1 16 Clean Air and Transportation bond initiative; other related funding issues and actions; state and federal planning issues; state and federal legislative issues; and other issues during 1993. Califomia. 1-11. Chief Executive Officers' Viewpoints on Transportation Planning. Salvucci, Frederick; Duane Berentson; William K. Hellmann, and Lowell Jackson. Transportation Research Record 1243: Future of Statewide Transportation Planning. 1989, Pp 12-18. Included in this paper are the viewpoints of both current and former chief executive officers of state departments of transportation concerning planning and its role in the decision-making process. 1-12. Choices for the Future - Four Transportation Visions for the 21st Century. Translinks 21 PlannIng Visions. Overview of Four Future Directions. Wisconsin Department of Transportation. 1993. What follows are four planning visions -- starting points for what transportation could look like by 2020 or earlier. These alternatives, which could emerge from Translinks 2 1, are designed to encourage discussion at public forums during the process. The actual plan may be one of these -- but more likely, it will include elements from each and modifications to all four. The four different planning visions presented for discussion include: Option #1: Wisconsin's future transportation system is driven primarily by market choices, with most public revnues and programs directed toward highway improvements. Economic development priorities are the primary factor in transportation decisions. Option #2: Wisconsin's transportation systems and polices remain largely as they are today. Highways remain the dominant mode of travel in Wisconsin. On a modest basis, more revenues are invested in complementary modes such as transit, freight and passenger rail, airports, harbors and bicycle facilities where they are appropriate and cost-effective. Option #3: While highways remain the primary mode of travel, a much wider range of transportation options is developed and enhanced in all areas of the state, supplementing highways as a travel choice. Environmental protection and travel choice, along with economic development, receive more emphasis. Option #4: Wisconsin's transportation decisions are shaped largely by environmental and sac al values. State regulations and pricing changes are implemented to reduce auto and truck travel and greatly expand or enhance urban and rural public transportation modes, and to shift freight movements from truck to rail. Wisconsin. 1-13. Colorado's 20 Year Transportation Plan. Colorado Department of Transportation. Aug 1994, Technical Report Number 1. Summary of Regional Transportation Plans. Colorado. 1-14. Communrties Planning for the Future: 2

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Section 1 - Statewide lannino Growth Management & Transportation in Washington State. Workshop 5: Concurrency Management Systems. Washington State Department of Transportation. (Olympia, WA). 1993. The transportation element of Washington's Growth Management Program (GMP) requires each city and county planning under the GMP to incorporate a Concurrency Management System into their comprehensive plan. A Concurrency Management System is a policy procedure designed to enable the city or county to determine whether adequate public facilities are available to serve new developments. Chapter 1 introduces the concurrency requirements of the GMP and provides a framework upon which a Concurrency Management System can be developed. Chapter 2 defines Level of Service (LOS) and describes how it needs to be applied within a Concurrency Management System. Chapter 3 outlines available funding sources, general revenue sources to maintain the transportation system, and private sources. A discussion is provided of how the concurrency funding can remain within the realm of the comprehensive plan and the six year capital facilities plan and transportation improvement program (TIP). Chapter 4 describes the steps necessary to allocate capacity, the relationship to the development review process, and several legal implications. Guidelines are provided as to which capacity allocation techniques may be appropriate for particular local conditions. Chapter 5 discusses strategies and methods used in monitoring capacity for a Concurrency Management System. (Chapter 6 is missing from the copy supplied to TRIS.) Chapter 7 defines the relationships among various public and private sectors with respect to concurrency management. It examines public and private sector relationships, intergovernmental relationships, and the relationship between the Concurrency Management Systems and other programs. Washi ngton. 1-15. Communities Planning for the Future: Growth Management & Transportation in Washington State. Workshop 1: Land Use and Transportation Linkages. Washington State Department of Transportation. (Olympia, WA). 1993. Washington's Growth Management Program includes a number of provisions which relate transportation decision making to decisions concerning land use and the implementation of local comprehensive plans. This begins with a vision of what the community desires for its quality of life, now and the in the future. The transportation challenge is to develop and finance a transportation system that helps to achieve the community vision. This workshop and coursebook 3 presents the basic components of the Growth Management Program that describe Land Use and Transportation Linkages. Chapter 1 is an overview of the transportation provisions in the Growth Management Program. Chapter 2 discusses the local transportation planningprocess. Chapters addresses the regional transportation planning process and intergovernmental coordination. Chapter 4 discusses the role of transportation in meeting the environmental goals of the Growth Management Program. Chapter 5 is an introduction to land use based travel models. Chapter 6 identifies the steps involved in developing the finance element of the transportation plan to ensure that proposed improvements are financially feasible to implement. Chapter 7 discusses concurrency management systems. Chapter 8 identifies and describes the range of possible actions to make the existing transportation system more efficient in moving people and goods. These include transportation demand management, transportation system management, and related land use strategies. Washington. 1-16. Connecticut Statewide Transit System Plan: Investing in Public Transportation 1990-2010. Final Report. Cambridge Systematics, Inc. (Cambridge, MA) and Connecticut Department of Transportation (Wethersfield, CT). Mar 1991. In 1989 the Connecticut Department of Transportation (ConnDOT) began the process of developing a long-range transit plan for the state. With the help of a team of experienced transportation planning and engineering firms, ConnDOT conducted a thorough analysis of statewide transit trip patterns and travel needs of current and potential transit riders. The development of the plan has been accomplished in two phases. Phase 1, reported on in an April 1990 report, constituted an assessment of statewide transit needs. This document represents the final report for Phase 11. Proposed public transportation facilities and services have been developed and evaluated on a region-by-region basis, including an analysis of costs, benefits, funding requirements, and implementation responsibilities. The product is an implementable program of improvements, with priorities, schedules, and a financing plan. Chapter 1 provides an introduction. The analysis methodology is summarized in Chapter 2. Each of the proposed transit actions or projects is then identified in Chapter 3, along with estimates of ridership, capital costs, and annual operating costs. The overall costs end statewide benefits of the transit system plan are summarized in Chapter 4, with particular attention given to potential impacts on traffic congestion, economic development, and the transit user. In Chapter 5, the identified transit projects are placed into a twenty year schedule of

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Project Bibliography - NCHRP 8-32 (1 ) implementation by five yeartime periods, financing needs are descnbed, and alternative funding mechanisms are assessed. The report concludes in Chapter 6 with an examination of potential implementation issues, examining in part cular legislative needs and responsibilities for the public and private sectors. Connecticut. 1-17. Defining the Florida Intrastate HIghway System and Implementing the Intrastate Highway System Policies and Priorities of the Florida Department of Transportation. Krzeminski, R. J.; S. Sklute; R. T. Stasiak, and M. F. Bean. 4th National Conference on Transportation Planning Methods Applications, A Compendium of Papers, Volumes I and 11, Faris, Jerry M., Editor; May 3 1993, Daytona Beach, Florida. The Florida Intrastate Highway System (FIHS) was established by the Flonda Legislature. The Flonda Department of Transportation is required to develop an FIHS plan delineating a statewide system of limited and controlled access facilities. The plan is to provide a statewide transportation network to accommodate high speed and high volume traffic movements within the state. The FIHS consists of Interstate highways, the Florida Turnpike system, and inter-regional and inter-city limited access facilities. In response to the requirement to provide this transportation network, the Department formulated its Intrastate Highway System Policies and Pnonties. This Policy limits the number of lanes on the Intrastat Highway System to ten. In urbanized areas with populations over 200,000, the ten lane maximum includes four physically separated exclusive lanes for high occupancy vehicles and through travel. The Policy requires the development of an intermodal system with provisions for high speed rail, transit, and high occupancy vehicles. It requires that additional capacity beyond that provided by the maximum highway section, be provided for by acquisition of sufficient nght-of-way for alternative transportation options. Implementation of the Policy is through the development of Multi-Modal Interstate Master Plans on the Interstate System and all other limited access roads on the FIHS. Similar multi-modal solutions are generated through Action Plans which are defined for the controlled access FIHS routes. Planning for the FIHS and implementation of the Department's polices have been guided by the application of geographic information systems (GIS) and the development of a decision support system exploiting the capabilities of the GIS. Program information and systems characteristics are displayed together on computer generated maps. Level of Service (LOS), pavement condition, safety, economic development, and intermodal connectivity are quantified as variables which are weighed to simulate policy decisions. This supports the graphical presentation of policy, which is then overlaid on maps depicting Work Program information and system characteristics. This information provides guidance on where to apply Master Plan and Anon Plan resources as the first step in the implementation of the Department's Intrastate Highway System Policies and Pnonties and the development of the FIHS. Florida 1-18. Defining the Future: Transportation Challenges for the Twenty-First Century. Hoel, Lester ~ Transportation Research Record 1243: Future of Statewide Transportation Planning. 1989, Pp4. 1-19. Demand Analysis and Modeling of Freight Transportation. Hashemian, Hassan. (California State University, Los Angeles, CA). Presented to Transportation Planning Methods Applications Conference, Apr 17 1995, Seattle, Washington. The use of air and truck transportation for the movementof goods has increased rapidly in recent years relative to the use of rail and barge. This growth can be explained partly by several changes in the American economy. As per capita income nses, there is a shift in consumer expenditures towards more highly fabricated products. As the economy evolves toward production of more highly fabricated goods and more expensive brands, models, and styles, the value of manufactures per unit of weight tends to rise because of the relatively greater inputs of labor and capital. These changes prompt shippers to demand higher quality freight service (e.g., speed and seaunty of goods) such as is offered by airlines and highway carriers. This paper explores an approach to modeling freight mode choice decisions; it seeks to understand the behavior of shippers in choosing between air and trucI< for small shipments of manufactured goods. The study's specific objective is to provide a quantitative description of the behavior of freight shippers, giving appropriate recognition and weight to the factors principally influencing mode choice. Data on actual choices are gathered here from published data sources and merged with data from other research studies into a data base. A binary probability model of mode choice snip be developed to measure the importance to shippers of transport attributes and commodity charactenstics. By using these measures, camers may develop guidelines to deter mine changes in modal choice from changes in modal service level. Empirical models will be estimated for several specifications, and the predictive power of the calibrated model will be tested on a holdout sample. 1-20. Demographic, Technological, and 4

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Legislative Changes: Their Implications for State DOTs. Rutherford, G. Scott; Edward D. Kottonowski (University of Washington); Stephanie MacLachlan (Washington State Transportation Center), and John M. Washington State Transportation Commission Ishimaru. Presented to the Annual Meeting of the Transportation Research Board, Jan 1995. Washington. 1-21. Development of a Manual for State Transportation Research. Reilly, Eugene., In Progress; NCHRP Project 20-7, Task 63. A problem statement (95-SP-8, "Development of a Manual for State Transportation Research") was submitted to the Standing Committee on Research (SCOR). This problem statement proposes the development of a generic research manual in response to the increased emphasis on state transportation research and the greater autonomy made possible by changes in federal oversight activities. The Region IV RAC requested that the Standing Committee on Highways fund a project to initiate development of the manual in a timely manner. At the meeting on October 23, 1993, the 20-7 Project Panel decided to fund the subject study at $50,000. The MCHRP has initiated a contract with Eugene Reilly Formerly research manager for the State of New Jersey) to conduct this effort. The initial meeting of the panel was held during the TRB Annual Meeting, and a work statement was developed. At the March 1994 meeting of the Standing Committee on Research, a research project (NCHRP-20-38, Administration of State Transportation Research) was approved to complete this work. Task 63 is complete. 1-22. Development of a Model Statewide Intermodal Transportation Plan for Louislana. LSU National Ports and Waterways Institute. Report on the Louisiana Intermodal Transportation Conference, Ju1191993. Louisiana. 1-23. Development of a Multimodal Framework for Freight Transportation Investments: Consideration of Rail and Highway Trade-Offs. Roop, Steve. (Texas A&M University System, College Station, TX)., In Progress; NCHRP Project 20-29. Transportation systems and policy in the United States have developed along modal lines with different patterns of ownership. For example, public agencies plan, build, operate and maintain the highway infrastructure, and private firms plan, build, operate, and maintain rail lines. While there have been some variations on this pattern with the construction of private toll roads and the investment of public funds in rail planning and rehabilitation, public planning and Section 1 - Statewide Planning investment decisions are usually made independently by mode. The negative effects of this dichotomy have become apparent, for example, when rail lines are abandoned. With few exceptions, federal and state highway trust funds are invested strictly in roads not rail. Similarly, rail funds under the Local Rail Freight Assistance (LRFA) Act and similar state programs may be used for substitute service, but they are rarely, if ever, invested in highways. Modally oriented planning and investment have been shown to be economically inefficient and generate fewer social benefits than might be achieved under a multimodal approach. For example, research has indicated that the abandonment of rail lines with the diversion of traffic from rail to truck, can significantly increase highway infrastructure costs. Thus, the investment of public funds in rail branch lines can not only generate shipper benefits but also red up future highway and bridge costs. The objectives of this research are to develop a framework for efficient and effective multimodal investment practices, demnonstrate the viability and applicability of the framework, identify obstacles to implementation at the state and local levels, and develop strategies for successfully implementing improved practices. The research will evaluate varied examples of transportation investment trade-offs focusing on rail-highway trade-offs in state rail program activities. 1-24. Development of a New Intermodal Facility, Inland Port, and Warehouse Distribution/Transload Facility at Fort Devens. Robinson, John. (Massachusetts Executive Office of Transportation). Submitted to Intermodal Planning Conference, Dec 7 1994, New Orleans, Louisiana. Fort Devens is a 4,500 acre [)epatment of Defense Installation in Ayer, Massachusetts. Closing the post means the loss of 9,000 jobs in the region and severely impacts the future of surrounding towns. This inland port and distribution center begins the reinvestment of primary and secondary employment opportunities. Unique to Rs development is the issue of leasing US Army proper y to operate a private sector Intermodal facility on an active military post. The project is dedicated to the creation of a full service domestic and international Intermodal facility and a full fledged effort to work with surrounding towns, the army, state transportation and appointed installation closure officials to mitigate impacts of closure before closure takes place. Massachusetts. 1-25. Development of a Statewide IVHS and Incident Management Master Plan for New Jersey. Della-Rocca. M. Proceedings of the IVHS America 1993 Annual Meeting, Surface Transportation: Mobility, Technology, and Society, Apr 14 1993, Washington, DC. s

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Pro ject Bibliography - NCHRP 8-32 (1 ) The New Jersey Department of Transportation (NJ DOT) has initiated a comprehensive process to develop a strategic master plan for traffic and incident management throughout New Jersey. As the most densely populated state in the country with the highest vehicle miles of travel per roadway mile, New Jersey's opportunities to add new highway capacity are virtually gone. The state has recognized that Intelligent Vehicle Highway Systems (IVHS) and incident management techniques offer significant benefits to the traveling public in terms of improved speeds, reliability, choice among modes, and traveler information. As a "non-attainment" state under the provisions of the Clean Air Act, IVES and incident management programs are especially important in New Jersey for minimizing vehicle emissions by reducing delays. New Jersey. 1-26. East-West Multimodal Corridor Study. Valdez de Henry, Myrna. (Parsons Brinckerhoff, Inc., Miami, FL). Submitted to Intermodal Planning Conference, Dec 7 1994, New Orleans, Louisiana. The East-West Multimodal Corridor Study is being conducted following the joint Federal Transit Administration/Federal Highway Administration Major Investment Analysis guidelines, and the Florida Department of Transportation (FDOT) Project Development and Environmental (PD&E) guidelines, all of which fully comply with the requirements of the National Environmental Protection Act (NEPA). The culmination of the study will be a final environmental impact statement and location design approval for the project. This is one of the first "multimodal" projects to be studied under ISTEA and under a joint memorandum of understanding entered into by FHWA, FTA, FRA, the Maritime Administration, US Coast Guard and FOOT. The East-West study area is a 22 mile corridor extending through one of the fastest growing areas in Dade County. DUG to the severity of the transportation problems experienced throughout the corridor, a number of multimodal highway/transit options are being examined including highway operational improvements; interchange and roadway access improvements; transit improvements (LRT, HOV, heavy rail, people-mover); IVHS improvements; bikeway improvements; and combinations of the above. The study is examining ways to facilitate movement along SR 836; connect the various transportation modes arriving at or near the airport with destinations along the corridor; improve access to activity areas along the corridor; improve local circulation in Miami Beach; provide linkages to existing transit (Metrorail and Metromover); provide direct service connections between the airport and the seaport cruise ships; and provide a distributor system between terminals within the seaport. A number of transportation modes will arrive at the future Miami Intermodal Center, to be located just east of the airport, including an airport circulator, commuter rail, Amtrak, buses, private vehicles, Metrorail, and possible high speed rail. The Miami Intermodal Center (MIC) is envisioned to be an Intermodal transfer center that would serv as the central connecting point for regional trips within the Greater Miami Area and an extension of the Miami International Airport. The modes arriving at the MIC would be provided easy access to the East-West Multimodal Corridor, both to an improved highway facility and a new transit system. Florida. 1-27. East-West Multimodal Corridor Study & Miami Intermodal Center Study. Project Update. Florida Department of Transportation. Miami, FL: Dec 1994. Florida. 1-28. Eastern Washington Intermodal Transportation Study. Lenzi, Jerry (Washington State Department of Transportation, Spokane, WA) and Ken Casavant (Washington State University, Pullman, WA). Submitted to Intermodal Planning Conference, Dec 7 1994, New Orleans, Louisiana. The "Eastern Washington Intermodal Transportation Study" (EWITS) is a six year comprehensive Intermodal transporation study. The overall study design includes several major elements and case studies. Through this study information is being developed which will help shape the Intermodal network necessary for the efficient movement of freight and passengers in eastern Washington. The study examines the movement and flow of commodities on a system that includes agricultural haul roads, the primary county, state, and federal roadway network, rail lines, inland waterways and a host of loading, transfer and storage facilities utilized primarily by the agricultural industry in eastern Washington. Economic models developed by the study will enable quick-response evaluation of the economic consequences of system changes such as rail fins abandonment, potential future seasonal river drawdowns, or expansion of the all weather roadway network. The study's economic linkages element assesses business location impacts of transportation system improvements. Later in the project, case studies will be developed on hazardous materials routing. Case studies will also be developed on interdty passenger travel issues with options to improve transit services. Lastly, benefits and costs of infrastructure improvements, and critical funding and management challenges will be identified. Results of the study will be used in exisiting regional and statewide transportation planning efforts, and in forecasting future freight and passenger transportation service needs for eastern Washington. Gaps in eastern Washington's 6

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Section 1 - Statewide Planning current transportation infrastructure will also be identified, as well as transportation system improvement options critical to economic competitiveness and mobility within eastern Washington. Washington 1-29. Effectiveness Of A Statewide Ridesharing Promotion: California Rideshare Weed Thayer, M. Transportation Research Record 1338. 1992, Pp 94-101. California's annual statewide rideshanng promotion reaches more people and attracts more participants each year because increasing resources are committed by the state department of transportation and local agencies. Private-sector contributions of money, products, and services are leveraged by public funding. The promotion is coordinated by a statewide coordinating committee, and local ridesharing agencies are responsible for adapting the promotion to their own region. Commuter participants in the promotion pledge to use a commute alternative for one day. Surveys of participants indicate that there has been some long-term change in commute mode, particularly occasional carpool use. At one agency, Commuters who requested ridematching assistance through pledge cards were more likely to be placed in carpools, but less likely to be placed in vanpools, than commuters who requested assistance through other means. Commute characteristics and motivation of pledge card applicants suggest that the promotion attracts applicants who may not others se utilize ridematching services. The promotion has had a significant effect on local ridesharing agencies, and has generated a sudden increase in demand that could lower the quality of service provided. California. 1-30. Effectiveness of Airport Capital Improvements Programming/Plannin in New Mexico. Czerniak, Robert J. (New Mexico State University). Presented to the Annual Meeting of the Transportation Research Board, Jan 1995. NOW Mexico. 1-31. An Evaluation of O-D Estimation Methods for Application to a Statewide Networks Pricker, Jon D. and James Yang. (Purdue University, West Lafayette, loll. Submitted to Transportation Planning Methods Applications Conference, Apr 17 1995, Seattle, Washington. Indiana. 1-32. Examples of Statewide Transportation Planning Practices. Balloffet and Associates, Inc. (Denver, CO). Jan 1995. "In providing mobility for people and goods, all levels of government are confronted with a rapidly changing focus and set of constraints. The transportation sector is faced with new legislative mandates as reflected by the Intermodal Surface Transportation Efficiency Act (ISTEA) of 1991. ISTEA, coupled with the CIoan Air Act Amendments (CAAA) of 1990, provides an impetus for change in transportation planning and project implementation. This new legislation has directed the focus of transportation planning away from providing capacity for vehicles to efficiency for muld-modal movement of people and goods, use of management systems in decision making, an enhanced role for metropolitan planning organizations (MPOs), air quality considerations, a new requirement for statewide transportation planning, and other important elements. Much of the ISTEA focus is new to local and State government and requires a carefully crafted response. Statewide transportation planning is one of the mechanisms for change that ISTEA provides. Statewide transportation plans integrate planning for multiple transport modes to balance the mobility needs of the State with future revenue sources. To support this requirement, the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) and the Federal Transit Administration (FTA) have issued statewide transportation planning rules. These rules identify twenty-three factors to be addressed in statewide plans." Quoted from the Introduction. 1-33. Facilitating Transportation Agency Management Through Performance Measurement: NYSDOT Experience with Management Performance Indicator Report. Albertin, Richard; Jacqueline Romeo; Lynn Weiskopf; John Prochera; John Rowen, and New York State Department of Transportation. Presented to the Annual Meeting of the Transportation Research Board, Jan 1 995. New York. 1-34. Family of Measures. Minnesota Department of Transportation. Feb 1995. "The current Strategic Management Process was initiated in 1992 to involve citizens in clarifying transportation issues and needs. An early product of this process is the Vision Statement we use to guide transportation policy and investment decisions. The purpose of our Vision Statement is threefold: (1~ to focus on the needs and priorities of Mn/DOTs customers, (2) to communicate the key results that MT/DOT intends to achieve to employees and others, (3) to direct resources to these key result areas. Only through clarity of direction and focus of efforts will improvements come about of the magnitude called for by our customers. In the Strategic Implementation document, the Vision and Strategic Directions have been broken down into meaningful and actionable focal 7

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Project Bibliography- NCHRP 8-32 points. Throughout MT/DOT, Strategic Implementation projects are underway to plan and make resource allocation decisions amed at these results. Senior Management has set direction and oversees these efforts." Quoted from the Introduction/Overview. Minnesota. 1-35. Feasibility of Developing a Statewide Modeling System for Forecasting Intercity Highway Volumes in Texas, Informational Report Number 7. Interim Report. Benson, J. D.; J. A. Mullins, 111, and G. B. Dresser. (Texas A&M University, Texas Department of Transportation, Federal Highway Administration). Oct 1991. In the urban transportation studies in Texas, computerized network based models (i.e., the urban travel forecasting models) are used to forecast future traffic volumes on the planned urban freeways and arterials to evaluate the capability of the proposed system to handle the forecast demand. Comparable statewide models (i.e., computerized network-based models) f or forecast) ng i nte rcity trig hway volu mes on the rural segments of the proposed Texas Highway Trunk System are not currently available in Texas. If such a set of models could be implemented for Texas, they would be useful in reviewing and updating the Texas Highway Trunk System Plan every five years. The feasibility of developing and implementing such a statewide modeling system was investigated as a part of the first year program under Study 2-10-90-1235. The objectives of this first year effort were: (1 ) To review and evaluate the current state of the practice for statewide models which focus on forecasting highway volumes on the rural sections of a statewide system such as the Texas Highway Trunk System; and (2) Based on these investigations, to recommend a set of statewide network-based modeling techniques that could be considered for implementation in Texas. This report presents the findings and recommendations from this investigation. Texas. 1-36. Federalism and the Intermodal Surface Transportation Efficiency Act of 1991. Netherton, Ross D. Legal Research Digest. Feb 1995, No. 32. State highway departments and transportation agencies have a continuing need to keep abreast of operating practices and legal elements of specific problems in highway law. This report is a new paper, which continues NCHRP's policy of keeping departments up-to-date on laws that will affect their operations. American federalism-the relationship between federal and the state and local governments - has survived because it has been able to accommodate changes in the nation's needs, goals, and public policies. In the field of surface transportation, this ability has been tested severely over the past 20 years as a result of major advances in technology, rearrangement of demographic patterns, socio-economic changes, and shifts in public policy. In surviving the impact of these trends, the federal-state relationship through which surface transportation systems have been developed in the twentieth century has itself undergone major changes. This process entered its latest and present phase with enactment of the Intermodal Surface Transportation Efficiency Act of 1991 (ISTEA). This report should give state officials, particularly legislators, highway administrators, attorneys, planners, and financial officials, a better understanding of the federal-state relationship, how federalism has changed over the years, and how federalism and ISTEA affect their respective highway programs. 1-37. Florida DOTE Quality Initiatives. Xanders, Gregory A. (Florida Department of Transportation). Presented to the Annual Meeting of the Transportation Research Board, Jan 1995. Florida. 1-38. Florida Five-Year Transportation Disadvantaged Plan. Final Report. University of South Flonda (Tampa, FL), Florida Transportation Disadvantaged Commission, and Florida Department of Transportation (Tallahassee, FL). Jun 1992. This report summarizes the five technical memoranda of the Florida five-Year Transportation Disadvantaged Plan. Mandated by Chapter 427.013~14), Florida Statutes, this plan covers the years 1992 through 1996. The five-year plan sets forth goals, objectives, and an action plan for the Transportation Disadvantaged Commission. Technical Memorandum No. 1 provides an introduction and historical perspective to transportation disadvantaged services in Florida. Technical Memorandum No. 2 reports on statewide operating data, on results of an attitudinal and needs survey, and on an evaluation of the existing transportation disadvantaged system in Florida. Technical Memorandum No. 3 presents demand forecasts for transportation disadvantaged transportation services over the next five years. Technical Memorandum No. 4 provides estimates of the cost of meeting the demand and explores the ability of current funding resources to meet that cost. Technical Memorandum No. 5 discusse policy issues and presents goals, objectives, and implementation strategies. Florida. 1-39. The Florida Transportation Plan 1990. Florida Department of Transportation. (Tallahassee, 8

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Section 1 Statewide Planning FL). 1990. The Florida Transportation Plan (FTP), mandated by Section 339.155, Florida Statutes, is a comprehensive plan having four primary functions: (1 ) Document the Systematic Planning Process; (2) Guide major transportation program planning for state facilities; (3) Provide specific priorities for program and funding levels for work program development; and (4) Provide guidance to state and local governments as well as regional agencies and metropolitan planning organizations who must develop transportation plans or have transportation planning functions. The 1990 FTP presented in this publication is a transition document bridging the coordinated planning process used in the past and the integrated planning process being developed for the 1991 FTP. The 1990 FTP outlines the new integrated planning process, introduces several new planning rules being developed, and documents a current estimate of needs by transportation mode. It lays the foundation for a process that will increase involvement of state, regional, and local agencies along with other public and private interests. Florida. 1-40. Forecasting Intermodal Competition in a Multimodal Environment. Neels, Kevin (Charles River Associates, Boston, MA) and Joseph Mather (New Jersey Transit, Newark, NJ). Transportation Research Record 1139. In this paper, the problem of accurately describing patterns of intermodal competition in a situation in which there are a large number of alternative modes available is discussed. This research was motivated by efforts to increase the capacity and usage of the existing Hudson River crossings connecting Manhattan and northern New Jersey. This corridor is characterized by the presence of an unusually large number of distinct transportation options and a high level of transit use. In such a setting, it is Important to know not just how many commuters might use a new service but also from which existing services they would be drawn. The mathematical structure of an Innovative model developed for NJ Transit and the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey to allocate demand across seven primary modes is presented. The representation of intermodal competition that this mode! provides is considered, and Its properties are contrasted with those of some commonly used variants of the familiar logit model. Empirical estimates of the own- and cross-elasticities of demand implied by the model coefficients are broken down by mode, service attribute, and geographic area. 1-41. Forward Oregon: Roads In a New Context. 1993 Oregon Roads Finance Study. Final Report. Oregon Department of Transportation. (Salem, OR). Jan 1 993. The 1993 Oregon Roads Finance Study is a major analysis of long-term needs, revenue adequacy, and funding alternatives to preserve Oregon's road infrastructure. Oregon's total road and bridge needs in the next 20 years are estimated at $48.8 billion in 1991 constant dollars ($79.4 billion in inflated dollars). This includes all current backlog needs and all projected needs through 2012 for the preservation, improvement, and operation of Oregon's 41,370 miles of road and 6,938 bridges. Oregon's road revenues are expected to total $23.7 billion in inflated dollars over the coming 20 years, based on currently authorized sources. This compares to high-priority needs of $42.9 billion in inflated dollars, which leaves a revenue shortfall of $19.2 billion. A program of early action by the State and by local governments is recommended to lay the foundation for meeting Oregon's road needs over the next 20 years. This program includes new funding authorities for roads and related transportation modes, changes in allocating road system monies, and a commitment to periodic increases in road revenues over the long term. The study is organized as follows: Executive Summary; (1) Roads in a Balanced Transportation System; (11) Roadway Needsfrom 1993 Through 20t2; (111) Funding Roads in Oregon Today; and (IV) A New Approach to Road Funding. There are nine appendices: (A) List of Primary Study Participants; (B) List of Study Work Products; (C) Glossary of Terms; (D) Comparison With 1986 Study; (E) Needs Inventory Methodology; (F) Oregon -- A National Leader in User Fees; (G) Vehicle Miles Traveled -- A Major Road Needs Issue in Oregon; (H) New Partnerships, Technologies in Road System Performance; and (1) Principles Guiding Recommended Funding. Oregon. 1-42. Freight Modeling Procedures for Statewide and Metropolitan Planning. Ismart, Dane. (Federal Highway Administration, Washington, DC). Presented to Transportation Planning Methods Applications Conference, Apr 17 1995, Seattle, Washington. Since the passage of ISTEA a renewed interest in freight planning has developed. ISTEA's requirement that Statewide and metropolitan planning incorporate the movement of both people and goods has created a strong interest in freight planning procedures. Also, environmental considerations, especially air quality concerns, has drawn increased interest in technical freight planning procedures. In response to ISTEA's planning requirements, FHWA has initiated several technical research projects to improve existing and develop new quick response freight planning procedures. This paper will present the results of the freight research projects as well as case study 9

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Project Bibliography - NCHRP 8-32 (1 ) applications. 1-43. The Freight Planning Process: The View from FHWA. Harvey, Jane F. (Federal Highway Administration). Second Annual National Freight Planning Conference Report, Matthew Coogan, Editor; Dec 8 1993, Fort Lauderdale, Florida. Published February 1994. 1-44. Freight Transportation Practices in the Public Sector. Coogan, Matthew A. (White River Junction, VT)., In Progress; NCHRP Project 20-5, Synthesis Topic 25-02. Planners and decision makers at all levels (federal, state, and local) are recognizing the need to consider the impacts of infrastructure investment and regulation upon shippers and carriers. As such, this synthesis of statewide and urban planning research and practice will address the freight concerns in light of the following issues: explicit management and consideration of intermodal needs; integration of metropolitan legs of the National Highway System around ports and terminals with the system at large; and explicit management of urban goods movement as an element of congestion management systems. The consultant has submitted the final draft of the synthesis, which has been reviewed by the Topic Panel. 1-45. Future Directions and Emerging Issues. Heanue, Kevin; George T. Lathrop, and Jim Charlier. Transportation Research Record 1243: Future of Statewide Transportation Planning. 1989, Pp 39. 1-46. Future of Statewide Transportation Planning: Overview. Meyer, Michael D. Transportation Research Record 1243: Future of Statewide Transportation Planning 1989, Pp 1-3. This paper presents an overview of the papers contained in this Transportation Research Record. These papers were presented at the Conference on the Future of Statewide Multimodal Transportation Planning, which was cosponsored by the Transportation Research Board Committee on Statewide Multimodal Planning and the American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials. Included is a discussion of the key concepts that emerged from the conference discussions. 1-47. Future of Transportation Technology. Willis, David K. and Douglass B. Lee. Transportation Research Record 1243: Future of Statewide Transportation Planning. 1989, Pp 47. 1-48. Greater Minnesota Transit Plan. Minnesota Department of Transportation. Jan 1993, Anal Draft. Minnesota. 1-49. Growth Allocation Using the Delphi Process. Gamble, T. and D. Pearson. 4th National Conference on Transportation Planning Methods Applications, A Compendium of Papers, Volumes I and 11, Paris, Jerry M., Editor; May 3 1993, Daytona Beah, Florida. This paper presents the methodology and results of the use of the Delphi process in allocating projections of households and employment to the zone level. As part of a project funded by the Texas Department of Transportation (TxDOT), a need was recognized for a simpler and faster procedure for developing demographic data at the zone level for travel demand modeling in smaller urban areas (populations less than 200,000~. In many cases, these smaller areas do not have the financial or personnel resources to allocate growth using more sophisticated models or methods. An existing technique (the Delphi process) was modified to allocate projected growth at the zone level. A qualitative measure of each zone's growth potential relative to the other zones in the area was established using the Delphi process and used to allocate projections of population and employment. The Delphi process provides reasonable results in a short time frame, which accelerates the overall planning process. The Delphi process uses an iterative process working with a panel of local experts and involved citizens to reach a consensus. A pilot project was conducted in the Longview, Texas, area in the summer of 1992 to examine the ability of the Delphi to allocate future growth. The result of this pilot project was the allocation of the area's projected population and employment for the year 2015 to 219 traffic analysis zones. A three-tiered process was employed beginning with the allocation of the projected growth to six districts, then disaggregating the district allocations to 35 areas, and finally allocating the area's growth to the 219 traffic analysis zones. The duration of the process from the first meeting with the panel to the formal adoption of the zone allocations by the Longview area Metropolitan Planning Organization (MPO) was less than three months. Benefits of the Delphi process include reduced costs to the MPO in both time and money; social, political, and legal advantages of basing the allocations on a panel consensus; nd involving members of local agencies and committees in the allocation of projected socioeconomic data. Texas. 1-50. Highway Cost and Pricing Study. Final Report. Cambridge Systematics, Inc. (Berkeley, CA). Wisconsin Department of Transportation, Sep 26 1994. Wisconsin. 10

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Section 1 - Statewide Planning 1-51. A Highway Needs Assessment Methodology for the Florida Transportation Plan. Li, S. C. and A. Vandewalk. 4th National Conference on Transportation Planning Methods Applications, A Compendium of Papers, Volumes I and 11, Paris, Jerry M., Editor; May 3 1993, Daytona Beach, Florida. Determining highway needs on an area-wide basis is an integral aspect of transportation plan development. Florida's coordinated planning procedures were refined by the passage of the State and Regional Planning Act (1984) and the Growth Management Act (1985~. Together, these Acts mandate the creation of local and State Comprehensive Plans which establish future transportation network requirements by projecting needs for transportation Improvements to ensure that facilities will be in place prior to growth. Recently, for the Florida Transportation Plan (FTP) twenty-year Needs Assessment, Florida Department of Transportation District 4 developed a methodology to analyze needs for Broward, Palm Beach, Martin, St. Luaie and Indian River Counties. The methodology involved computer forecasting models supplemented by a unique program designed to determine the needs in terms of additional lanes required to meet the Florida Statewide Minimum Acceptable Operating Level of Service (LOS) Standards. A different capacity standard used for comprehensive plans and computer modelling results in the fact that model reported volume/capacity ratios cannot be employed to judge highway LOS deficiencies. The program called Additional Laneage Evaluation Program (AD DLNS) bridges the different capacity standards. The first step in the process was to develop a relationship between modelling link attributes and roadway classifications of the Florida Statewide Minimum Acceptable Operating LOS to create an Acceptable LOS Service Flow Rate table. Projected 2001 and 2011 socioeconomic data sets were then loaded onto "existing plus committed" networks in the TRANPLAN based Florida Standard Urban Transportation Model Structure (FSUTMS) to establish demand. ADDLNS, which was specifically developed to use model output volumes to assess highway network deficiencies by incorporating the Acceptable LOS Service Flow Rate table, was utilized to determine the number of additional lanes required. ADDLNS also facilitates the graphic display of oadways needing widening. This paper describes the methodology and results of applying this streamlined and efficient process to determine highway network needs without manual link- by-link capacity calculations. The process is also flexible in adopting different acceptable LOS standards. It was concluded that the methodology is a viable tool for area-wide highway needs assessments. Florida. 1-52. History of Intermodalism in Maryland From a Highway Perspective. Kassoff, Hal. (Maryland State Highway Administration). Submitted to Intermodal Planning Conference, Dec 7 1994, New Orleans, Louisiana. "Intermodalism" comes relatively easy in Maryland. Although we have not always called it intermodalism, this is something which has been happening and becoming fairly natural over the past twenty plus years. What we have been doing is Creating intermodal interfaces that are as seamless as possible," or as Congressman Roe refers, "making it possible to get there from here." A large part of making intermodalism work well in Maryland over the past several decades, is the fact that Maryland's different modes work well together. This is not an accident. Within the Maryland Department of Transportation (MOOT) framework there is a broad range of transportation facilities, services and responsibilities consisting of ownership, management and operation of State highways, public transportation (commuter rail, heavy rail, light rail, and buses); airports (2 operating airports including a major international airport); seaports (several operating terminals); toll facilities (S bridges, two tunnels); motor vehicle activities (registration and drivers license) plus some short line rail responsibilities. Evidently, Maryland has a broad outlook on transportation, consisting of what mode ts) of transportation can best do the job and how other modes can assist. Maryland. 1-53. 1-95 Corridor Coalition. Kassoff, Hal. (Maryland State Highway Administration). Submitted to Intermodal Planning Conference, Dec 7 1994, New Orleans, Louisiana. A partnership of 14 state and local DOT's, 12 transportation authorities, and 11 other related organizations whose mission is to work cooperatively to improve mobility, safety, environmental quality, and the efficiency of interregional and inter-modal travel of people and goods in the Northeast through real-time communication and operational management of the area's transportation system. In doing so, the Coalition will seek to establish an economically beneficial, mutli-modal framework for early implementation of appropriate IVHS technology. 1-54. 1-95 Corridor Commercial Vehicle Market Segmentation: Trucks. Cambridge Systematics, Inc. Jan 1995, Technical Memorandum. This technical memorandum summarizes the results of an effort to describe the motor carder market operating in the 1-95 corridor (Phase 1, Task 1, Subtask la of the work plan). The goals of this effort were as follows: (1) To define the major motor carrier industry segments in the 1-95 corridor; and (2) To identify the types of carriers who should be interviewed to determine motor carrier needs for traffic and inadent information in the 11

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Project Bibliography - NCHRP 8-32 (1 ) Cousins, Luke and Richard J. Drake. (Georgia Department of Transportation). Submitted to Intermodal Planning Conference, Dee 7 1994, NOW Orleans, Louisiana. The SavannahlChatham County area of Georgia is a major coastal transportation Hub in the Southeastern USA, composed of Rail, Highway, Seaport, Airport and Pipeline Transportation systems. The study shall first determine and analyze the current movement of goods and materials between the various freight transportation systems. Then, in concert with the modal owners/operators, identify and quantify potential areas for improved economic and operational efficir r 'S. Georgia. 1-143. Special Edition Newsletter: STIP (Statewide Transportation Improvement Program) Development. Lowe, R., Editor (Minnesota Department of Transportation, St Paul, MN). Oct 1993. This booklet reflects draft Statewide Transportation Improvement Program (STIP) activities in Minnesota during July and August of 1993. Also included is a brief progress report on Minnesota's Intermodal Surface Transportation Efficiency Act (ISTEA) Areawide Transportation Partnerships (ATPs). Mlnnsota. 1-144. The Stark County Intermodal Facility: An Innovative Financing Example. Platt, John R. (Ohio Department of Transportation). Presented to Transportation Research Board Conference on Intermodalism, Dec 9 1994, New Orleans, Louisiana. Ohio. 1-145. State and Regional Comprehensive Planning. Buchsbaum, P. A. and L. J. Smith. (EditorsJ. Chicago, IL. American Planning Association, 1993. The idea of a state-directed approach to planning and growth management is fairly new. This book presents the experiences of nine states at the leading edge of the statewide planning movement. The reader will find out how these states have set standards to protect farmland and sensitive environmental lands, prevent urban sprawl, and meet infrastructure needs. The reader will gain insight on how to resolve the conflicting interests involved in growth management. 1-146. State Departments of Transportation: Strategies for Change. I4CHRP Report 371. Larson, Thomas. (National Academy of Public Administration, Washington, DC). Washington, DC. Transportation Research Board, 1995, NCHRP Project 20-24~9~. State departments of transportation (DOTS) are continually evolving because of planned and unplanned reactions to internal and external influences. Recently, however, the pace of this evolutionary process has greatly accelerated so much so, that many state DOTs must rethink traditional ways of doing business. Influences contributing to this evolution include economic and demographic changes, variations in service and use demands, legislative edicts, rehabilitation needs versus new construction, modal integration, and elective and mandated changes in relationships with other governmental agencies and private organizations. The objectives of this research are to (1) evaluate current and potential influences that affect the future of state DOTS, (2) describe and discuss the impacts on DOTS, (3) provide guidance for DOTs to assess their ability to respond, and (4) recommend solutions or techniques that will assist in the transition of DOTs to most current and future challenges. 1-147. State DOT Comments. Pedersen, Neil J. (Maryland State Highway Administration). A Paper Within the Session, Public Interest Group Assessments of Impacts of ISTEA on Environmental Quality and Comments from Other Perspectives: Presented to the Annual Meeting of the Transportation Research Board, Jan 1995. Maryland. 1-148. State DOT Comments. Walker, Thomas. (Wisconsin Department of Transportation). A Paper Within the Session, Public Interest Group Wish List for ISTEA Reauthorization and Comments from Other Perspectives: Presented to the Annual Meeting of the Transportation Research Board, Jan 1995. Wisconsin. 1-149. State Multimodal and Intermodal Transportation: An Overview of Policies and Programs Promoting Economic Growth: A Report. Walton, C. M. and L. B. Boske. Austin, TX. Lyndon B. Johnson School of Public Affairs, 1989, N90. Texas. 1-150. State of the Practice: Transportation Planning. Pedersen, Neil J.; Carl B. Williams; Susan Mortel, and Henry Peyrebrune. Transportation Research Record 1243: Future of Statewide Transportation Planning. 1989, Pp 19-31. Included are the following: a discussion on long-range, statewide, multimodal transportation planning in Maryland; comments on the challenge of preserving interregional mobility and improving urban mobility in California; overview of the Michigan Department of Transportation's investment planning process and 28

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Section 1 - Statewide Planning some of the successful strategies that have been used to implement that investment plan, as well as future goals; and a review of the 2020 process and discussion of implications for multimodal statewide planning in New York. Maryland California Michigan New York. 1-151. State Role in Public Transportation. Transportation Research C'rcular 343. Dec 1988, Pp 84. This Circular summarizes a National Conference on the State Role in Public Transportation, conducted by the Transportation Research Board in cooperation with the American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials. The conference, which was held June 1-3, 1988, in Fredericksburg, Virginia, examined the state role in four major public transportation issues: performance monitoring, technical assistance and research, funding, and interagency/intermodal coordination. The Circular contains an executive summary, workshop summaries and the following resource papers: Public Transportation Performance Monitoring, L.C. MacDorman; The State Role in Technical Assistance and Research, S.F. Knapp; State Transit Funding Issues, J. Dockendorf; and Interagency/lntermodal Coordination, D.N. Tudor and R. Halvorson. . 1-152. Statewide Bicycle Planning in the United States. Ferguson, E. and D. 1. Montgomery. Transportation Research Record 1396. 1993, Pp 37~3. The Intermodal Surface Transportation Efficiency Act of 1991 (ISTEA) significantly enhances opportunities for bicycle planning, funding, and coordination at the state level. Georgia Tech designed, implemented, and analyzed the results of a survey of state transportation departments regarding bicycle planning and related activities. The survey was mailed to all 50 states and the District of Columbia in March 1992. By June 1, 43 responses had been received (84%~. Statewide bicycle planning activities increased in the early 1 970s, the late 1 970s, the early 1 980s, and more recently after the passage of ISTEA. RJIost states treat bicycles as legal vehicles on state highways. About had of the states surveyed have a bicycle department or position and a atizen-led bicycle advisory committee or provide funding for bicycle programs and projects. Few states currently have comprehensive statewide bicycle plans. Several states are in the process of developing such plans. Legalization of bicycle usage on streets and highways is a clear national trend not critical to the adoption of statewide bicycle plans. Funding and institutionalization appear to be more supportive of state bicycle planning. Bicycle advisory committees often are associated with more active state involvement in bicycle planning. This may be due to the importance of r`?cre~ional and tourist activities in bicycle system utilization, at least in some states. Bicycle facilities designed to serve these types of travel generally require a broader than purely local perspective to achieve success in systems planning and design. 1-153. Statewide Goals, Objectives and Actions. Michigan Department of Transportation. Michigan. 1-154. Statewide Highway Planning Procedures. Participant Workbook, NHI Course No. 15127. Covil, J.; M. Sexton, and L. Stephens. (Wilbur Smith and Associates, Washington, DC). Jun 1990. Statewide highway planning procedures and the current state-of-the-practice are documented in the report. The purpose is to provide an instruction manual for the participants in NHI Course No. 15127, and also, a reference manual that can be used to determine common practices in the eight important areas of statewide planning. 1-155. Statewide Intermodal Transportation Planning: A Regional Perspective on the Public Involvement Process. Perkins, Judy A. and Ibibia K. Dabipi. (Southern University, Baton Rouge, LA). Submitted to Transportation Planning Methods Applications Conference, Apr 17 1995, Seattle, Washington. . . oulsla~na. 1-156. Statewide Multimodal Terminal Renovations. Mallery, Gilbert. (Washington State Department of Transportation, Olympia, WA). Submitted to Intermodal Planning Conference. DQC 7 1994. New Orleans, . . ~= L. . Oulslana. Fourteen communities in the state of Washington nave been selected as viable candidates for multimodal terminals. Currently, these communities are in various stages of planning, design or construction involving the renovation of old train depots and in one case a ferry terminal into efficient multimodal terminals. Some communities are renovating terminals to handle high speed rail passenger service, combined with bus, ferry, auto, bicycle, and taxi service. For communities alog the north-south corridor from Seattle, Washington to Portland, Oregon, the renovation of old train depots into efficient multimodal terminals is considered essential for successful high speed rail passenger service. Other small communities are preparing to removate old train depots into multimodal terminals to more efficiently connect rail travel with the roadway system. Washington. 1-157. Statewide Multimodal Transportation Plan. 29

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Project Bibliography - NCHRP 8-32 (1 ) Washington State Department of Transportation. (Olympia, WA). Sep 1994. Washington. 1-158. Statewide Multimodal Transportation Planning Process. Prospectus. Wisconsin Department of Transportation. Nov 12 1 992. Wisconsin. 1-159. Statewide Transportation Plan, Overview 1988. Oregon Department of Transportation. (Salem, OR). 1989. Oregon. 1-160. Statewide Transportation Systems Plan: Draft Service Objectives. Washington State Transportation Commission. Fall 1992. Washington. 1-161. A Statewide Travel Demand Model System for New Hampshire. Rossi, Thomas F.; Kevin F. Tierney, and William E. Craven. (Cambridge Systematics, Cambridge, MA). Submitted to Transportation Planning Methods Applications Conference, Apr 17 1995, Seattle, Washington. New Hampshire. 1-162. Statewide Workshop Report. Mid-Year Meeting Of The Committee On Transportation Data And Information Systems, Washington, D.C., October 24-25, 1989. Meyer, M. D. Transportation Research Record 1271. 1990, Pp 34. The Statewide Workshop identified planning and policy issues and noted gaps in the available data. Conclusions and recommendations of this workshop are as follows: (1 ) More coordination between data bases that state DOTs deal with is needed. (2) GIS should foster the above coordination. (3) Further research and implementation of results of collection of data on trucks is needed. (4) Data are needed for evaluating intermodal concepts. (~) User benefits are important evaluative measures. What do they mean to other parts of society and the economy? (6) An authoritative review should be made of the relationship between transportation investment and economic development, productivity, and competitiveness along with a determination of the data required. (7) Performance and LOS data is required. HPMS should be modified if possible, to include such a measure. (8) There is sufficient data in rural and non-urban areas of the states. Complete data bases across each state to allow consistency in planning between urban and rural areas are needed. (9) A strategy should be established for collecting condition data on state transit facilities. (1 O) At least 2% of all federal transportation aid to metropolitan areas and states go to transportation planning and research with data collection, data management, and analysis a major part of a transportation research and planning effort. (t 1 ) With relation to aviation data, there needs to be a consistency in data and analysis to relate national airspace planning to physical plans for airports. (12) Better information is needed about such topics as fuel consumption and evasion of taxes, because this important information is used to allocate funds. (13) The 1990 Census should be used to check forecasts to see how the models might be improved. (14) To avoid information gridlock, a review should be made of management strategies for data collection. The TRB Committee on Data and Information Systems should do a prototype study of what a good data management system shoud be. 1-163. Strategic Mobility Plan...ldentifying Transportation Requirements, 1990-2009. Texas State Department of Highways & Public Transportation, (Austin, ~X). Feb 1989. This report presents the Strategic Mobility Plan (SMP) of the Texas State Department of Highways and Public Transportation for 1990 through 2009. Following an introduction, the contents are presented in the following chapters: (1) The Highway System; (2) Multimodal Transportation; (3) Administration and Support; (4) Transportation-Related Services; and (5) Summation. Fiscal requirements for the years 1990-2009 in this SMP are $82.6 billion, in constant 1988 dollars. The distribution by major areas is as follows: (1) Highway System - 94.7%; (2) Multimodal Transportation - 1.0%: (3) Administration and Support- 2.3%; and (4) Transportation-Related Services - 2.0%. Texas. 1-164. Strategic Planning, Total Quality, and Performance Measurement: A Quality Director's View. Etmanczyk, James S. (Wisconsin Department of Transportation). Presented to the Annual Meeting of the Transportation Research Board, Jan t 995. Wisconsin. 1-165. Strategic Transportation Policy Planning in Washington State. Howard, C. E. and B. J. O'Sullivan. Proceedings of the Third National Conference, Transportation Planning Methods Applications, Transportation Research Board, Apr 22 1991, Dallas, Texas. Pp 14. This paper summarizes the origins and evolution of Washington's strategic transportation policy planning process since 1988. The discussion includes several 30

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Section 1 - Statewide Planning key elements. First, the strategic planning model adopted for statewide policy planning is described. Second, the organizational and membership characteristics of this process are detailed. Third, the broad range of approved policies "in place" are outlined. The fourth section examines the challenge of delivering meaningful policy implementation. Finally, the paper concludes with a look at prospective improvements to the strategic policy planning process. Washington. 1-166. Survey and SummarIes of Metropolitan Planning Organizations and State Departments of Transportation. Michigan Department of Transportation. (Lansing, Ml). Nov 1 992. This publication presents the results of a survey examining the relationships between state departments of transportation, metropolitan planning organizations, and transit agencies, and how they are affected by the passing of the Intermodal Surface Transportation Efficiency Act of 1991. The survey was created by a task force appointed by the AASHTO Standing Committee on Planning. Gloria J. Jeff, Deputy Director of Transportation Planning, at the Michigan Department of Transportation led the task force. 1-167. A Survey of States' Current Multimodal Data Collection. American Assoc ation of State Highway and Transportation Officials. Washington, DC: Dec 1992. 1-168. Translinks 21: A Multimodal Transportation Plan for Wisconsin's 21 st Century. Wisconsin Department of Transportation. (Madison, Wl). Wisconsin. 1-169. Translinks 21: Multi-Modal Intercity Passenger Analysis. Draft Final Report. Volume 1: Base Data and Forecasting Methodology. KPMG Peat Marwick; HNTB Corporation, and Midwest System Sciences, Inc. Wisconsin Department of Transportation, Jun 1995. Wisconsin. 1-170. TRANSLINKS 21 - Transportation and Economic Development. Wisconsin Department of Transportation. Wisconsin Translinks 21. Oct 1993, Vol. 1, No. 6. Wisconsin. 1-171 . Translinks 21 Transportation Plan: Intercity Modal Forecasts and Interactions. Wisconsin Department of Transportation. (Madison, Wl). Nov 1994. 31 Wisconsin. 1-172. Transportation2010: Ground Transportation Plan. Summary. Rhode Island Department of Administration. (Providence, Rl). Jul 1992. The Rhode Island State Planning Council adopted the "Transportation 2010: Ground Transportation Plan" (Report Number 75, March 1992) as element 611 of the State Guide Plan on June 13, 1991. This report is a summary of that plan. It includes the entire part of the plan on "Policies and Recommendations". Rhode Island. 1-173. Transportation Alternatives for Economic Development in Wisconsin. Wisconsin Department of Transportation. (Madison, Wl). Feb 1994. Economic development and transportation are closely linked. Economic development stimulates transportation demand by increasing the number of workers commuting to and from work, customers traveling to and from services areas, and products being shipped between producers and consumers. Additional demand can then trigger the need for transportation improvements Improvements which decrease transportation costs and increase safety may, in turn, stimulate further economic development. Transportation improvements do not guarantee increased economic development. To increase economic development, an improvement needs to decrease transportation costs or make transportation more reliable. A proper economic climate must also exist, as well as other support services. With these factors in place, transportation improvements can become catalysts for economic expansion. While this issue paper concentrates heavily on freight and passenger issues related to economic development, WisDOT recognizes that economic development cannot come at the expense of our environment or quality of life. Wisconsin. 1-174. Transportation and Economic Development in the Upper Midwest: New Models for Federal, State and Local Cooperation In Infrastructure Investment. Schuh, G. E.; L. W. Munnich, Jr.; C. Campbell; G. DeCramer; B. Rohde; R. Salmela; M. Enerson; J. Kaden; P. Hudson, and C. Peterson. (Minnesota University, Minneapolis, MN). Sep 1993. In 1991, prior to the passage of the Intermodal Surface Transportation Efficiency Act (ISTEA), the United States Congress funded a grant to the Federal Highway Administration which enabled the State and Local Policy Program of the University of Minnesota's Hubert H. Humphrey Institute for Public Affairs to

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Project Bibliography - NCHRP 8-32 (1 ) conduct a multi-state project to explore transportation and infrastructure finance policy. The timing of the project created an opportunity for the five states involved--lowa, Minnesota, Montana and North and South Dakota--to inform the provisions of ISTEA. A series.of consultations were held in each state. They focused on issues of public policy that challenge the economic future of the Upper Midwest. In addition to the proceedings of the research symposium, written reports, transcriptions of oral presentations, workbooks, and evaluations have been generated by each state and have been submitted to the Humphrey Institute's State and Local Policy Program. This final report is a summary of the entire effort. The first section provides background information. The project policy recommendations are contained in the second section of this report. The third section presents the regional picture of the Upper Midwest. The principle findings are: (1 ~ Strategic investment in efficient transportation systems brings productive returns; and (2) The greatest barriers to productivity are institutional and political; therefore multi- state regional cooperation and collaboration are necessary to having a sustainable and prosperous economy. 1-175. Transportation and Growth Management: A Planning and Policy Agenda. Center for Urban Transportation Research, University of South Florida. (Tampa, FL). Jan 1994. The Florida Legislature and the Governor's Office directed the Center for Urban Transportation Research to undertake the State Transportation Policy Initiative (STPI). The purpose of this multi-phase study is to reevaluate the way transportation infrastructure and services are planned and developed at the state and local levels in Florida and to formulate options for implementing requirements of the 1991 Intermodal Surface Transportation Efficiency Act. This report is one of a series of publications resulting from Phase I of the STPI. The first chapter reviews the policy context for planning in Florida and implications of the changing policy framework. The second chapter reviews methods used by local governments to plan for future land use needs and addresses the issue "How much is too much?" Issues and recommendations regarding current transportation planning practice are examined in the third chapter. The challenges of achieving consistency between land use and transportation planning are discussed In the fourth chapter. Finally, in the fifth chapter, the report addresses the question of intergovern mental coordination. Florida. 1-176. Transportation and lowa's Economic Future. Forkenbrock, D. J.; N. S. J. Foster, and M. R. Crum. (lowa University, Public Policy Center, Iowa City, IA). 1993. This is a study of how transportation policy can be fashioned to improve lowa's long-term economic prospects. The research focuses on the state level and covers pricing, resource allocation, investment, and other issues that directly affect the performance of public facilities that support transportation of goods and people to and from points in Iowa. Chapter 1 is an introduction. Chapter 2 begins with an assessment of how lowa's economy is changing, both functionally and spatially. Commuting patterns and methods of goods movement are then discussed. The purpose of this analysis is to provide a context for the exploration of transportation policy issues in subsequent chapters. In Chapter 3 a framework is established for evaluating changes in transportation policies. A working definition of economic development is given and the role of government policies in making an area more attractive to economic activity is considered. Chapter 4 analyzes public policy options for lowa's roads and highways. These policy options are intended to help the state compete for economic activity. Chapter 5 assesses alternative investment strategies for major navigational facilities on the upper Mississippi River. Chapter 6 examines major transportation policy issues in lowa's agricultural sector. The current magnitude of agricultural shipments and the roles of several modes are presented. After focusing on issues related to railroad competitiveness, the analysis turns to how lowa's rural roads should be financed. The need for joint investment and pricing decisions affecting waterways, railroads, and rural roads is stressed. Chapter 7 examines the current status of freight transportation in Iowa. An assessment is made of issues related to trucking and of intermodal transportation and its potential for cost-effective shipping to and from businesses in Iowa. Chapter 8 summarizes the key findings of this study, offering ten recommendations. These recommendations relate to transportation as a means of facilitating economic evelopment. Iowa. 1-177. Transportation Characteristics of Wheat and Barley Shipments on Haul Roads To and From Elevators In Eastern Washington. Newkirk, Jonathan R. and Kenneth L. Casavant. (Washington State University, Pullman, WA). Mar 1995, EWITS Research Report Number 5. Washington. 1-178. Transportation Data Needs: Programs for a New Era - Implications for State DOTs and MPOs (Introduction). Sosslau, A. B. May 27 1992, Irvine, California. Conference Proceedings Published in Transportation Research Circular 407, Washington, DC, April 1993, 32

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Section 1 - Statewide Planning Pp5. This conference introduction summarizes the recommendations from the last major conference related to transportation data needs that was held in October ~ 989, and discusses the purpose of the present conference. That purpose was to generate and present ideas that would help develop positive and productive data programs which are cost effective and will support the new demands of decision makers. There were four panels with presentations and discussion on the first day. On the second day there were four concurrent workshops. The anticipated result of the conference was guidance to states and Metropolitan Planning Organizations in developing their work programs for upcoming years. Such programs will take into account the new requirements of the Intermodal Surface Transportation Efficiency Act of 1991 (ISTEA) and the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1 990 (CAAA). 1-179. Transportation Improvement Account Program Workshop. State of Washington Transportation Improvement Board. Nov 1994. Washington. 1-180. Transportation Needs of Eastern Washington Fruit, Vegetable and Hay Indsutries. Gillis, William R.; Emily Gruss Gillis (The Gillis Group, Olympia, WA), and Kenneth L. Casavant (Washington State University, Pullman, WA). Mar 1995, EWITS Research Report Number 7. Washington. 1-181. Transportation Planning and Decision Making: A Local Perspective. Street, J. Tranportation Planning, Programming, and Finance: Proceedings of a Conference, Jul 19 1992, Seattle, Washington. Proceedings Published in Transportation Research Circular 406; Apr 1993: Pp 18-22. This conference keynote address discusses the transportation planning and decision making currently underway in the State of Washington from the local perspective. The concept of concurrency, between infrastructure development and the grouch and development in terms of land use, is discussed, followed by a discussion of the concept of consistency by which local governments will continue to work on their comprehensive plans and then will go through basically an iterative process, coming back with those plans to the county level to determine if they are consistent and, if not, determining what changes need to be made and at what level (local, county, state). Washington. 1-182. Transportation Planning and Programming 33 Lessons from Wisconsin. Kennedy, Rob. (Transportation Advisor to the Public Intervenor and State Environmental Groups, Madison, Wl). Wisconsin. 1-183. Transportation Planning for State Purposes. Center for Urban Transportation Research. (University of South Florida, Tampa, FL). Jun 1994. Recent legislation and fiscal trends in Florida and nationwide have created a unique combination of restraints and opportunities, providing an impetus for examining the way Florida conducts transportation planning. In response to these challenges, the Florida Legislature and the Governors Office directed the Center for Urban Transportation Research to undertake the State Transportation Policy Initiative (STPI). As part of the STPI, research has been undertaken to examine methods employed by other states to identify transportation needs, set priorities, allocate modal roles, estimate costs, determine who should pay, make decisions, and determine the relationship between transportation and land USE. This study element focuses on the attainment of programs of major state importance that support Florida's growth management and comprehensive planning statutes, the Intermodal Surface Transportation Efficiency Act, the Clean Air Act Amendments, and other federal statutes. Florida. 1-184. Transportation Planning, Programming, and Finance. Transportation Research Board/National Research Council. Transportation Research Circular. Apr 1993, Number 406. 1 -1 85. Transportation Planning, Programming, and Finance: Proceedings of a Conference (Introduction). Meyer, M. D. Jul 19 1992, Seattle, Washington. Published in Transportation Research Circular 406; Apr 1993: Pp 2. The Transportation Research Board, in conjunction with the Federal Highway Administration, the Federal Transit Administration, and the Washington State Department of Transportation, held a conference in Seattle whose primary purpose was to examine the major characteristics of multimodal planning and programming. This conference introduction discusses the conference purpose, organization, participants, and objectives which were as follows: (1 ) review the emerging issues affecting planning and programming decisions, e.g., accommodating environmental criteria and implications of the recent clear air and wetlands requirements; (2) assess current and new approaches

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Project Bibliography- NCHRP 8-32 (1) to programming and planning including institutional and technical aspects; (3) determine the steps required to address emerging issues; and (4) develop a research agenda. 1-186. Transportation Solutions for ''Today, Tomorrow And Beyond". Minnesota Department of Transportation. (St Paul, MN). Proceedings of the 4th National Conference for Small and Medium-Sized Areas, May 25 1994, Duluth, Minnesota. The purpose of this conference was to bring together a broad representation from small and medium-sized communities to share their solutions to common transportation problems and to discuss the implementation of the Intermodal Surface Transportation Efficiency Act (ISTEA) in their communities. The conference was dividedinto three tracks which ran concurrently through each of the four sessions. The tracks were as follows: TRACK-A - Policy, Administration and financial; TRACK-B - Transportation Issues; and TRACK-C - Planning Issues. The majority of the papers presented at the conference are included in these Proceedings and are arranged by session number and track as follows: TRACK 1A - New Partnerships and Influences; TRACK 1 B - Environmental; TRACK 1 C - Travel Demand Management (TDM); TRACK 2A - Education; TRACK 2B - Land Use; TRACK 2C - System Planning; TRACK 3A - Project and Agency Administration; TRACK 3B - Intermodal; TRACK 3C - Environmental Process; TRACK 4A - Management Systems; TRACK 4B - Mobility; TRACK 4C - Modeling and Data Management; and General Sessions. Minnesota. 1-187. Trends and Forecast of Florida's Transportation Needs. McHugh, R.; D. Gray; B. Keitgen, and C. Thomas. (University of South Florida, Tampa, FL). Oct 1993. The Florida Legislature and the Governor's Office directed the Center for Urban Transportation Research (CUTR) to undertake the State Transportation Policy Initiative (STPI). The purpose of this multi-phase study is to reevaluate the way transportation infrastructure and services are planned and developed at the state and local levels in Florida and to formulate options for implementing requirementsofthe 1991 Intermodal Surface Transportation Efficiency Act. This report is one of a series of publications resulting from Phase I of the STPI. Its purpose is to describe Florida's trends in private transportation over the past 20 years and to create a forecast of Florida's transportation needs and resources over the next 20 years. Following an Executive Summary and Introduction, the report is organized in three sections. The first section provides a description of trends in the use of Florida's transportation system over the past 20 years. This overview compares the most recent trends to those in earlier decades and also makes a comparison of these trends between Florida and selected other states over the same time period. The extent and quality of the state's road system are also described and compared to these other states. The next section reports on the bulk of the empirical research that has been conducted for this report. The formal economic forecast model is described, the theoretical underpinnings for the precise specification are presented, and the final forecast model estimates are reported. Once that model is identified, it is used to provide forecasts of motor fuels sales in the state through the year 2010. The sensitivity of the motor fuel USE forecasts to the assumptions that have been made regarding the underlying growth in the Flonda economy, the growth in the real price of motor fuels, the growth in tourism activity, QtC., are examined. The final section of the report explores the potential quantitative importance of several broad socioeconomic and policy trends that may influence the ue of motor fuels in the future. In particular, the degree to which trends in the use of alternative fuels and in telecommuting will affect future road use and funding are explored. Florida. 1-188. Urban Arterial Trust Account Program Workshop. State of Washington Transportation Improvement Board. Nov 1994. Washi ngton. 1-189. US Intermodal Planning: Progress Report. Collins, Carrol E. and Scott M. Festin. (University of North Carolina at Charlotte, Charlotte, NC). Submitted to Transportation Planning Methods Applications Conference, Apr 171995, Seattle, Washington. 1-190. Venture Washington - IVHS Strategic Plan for Washington State. Washington State Department of Transportation. (Seattle, WA). Washington. 1-191. Vermont's Long Range Transportation Plan. Vermont Agency of Transportation Planning Division, with the assistance of Wilbur Smith Associates. Mar 15 1 995. Vermont. 1-192. The Virginia Department of Transportation's Strategic Plan for an Intelligent Vehicle-Highway Systems Program. Smith, B. L. Proceedings of the IVHS America 1993 Annual Meeting. Surface Transportation: Mobilit, 34

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Section 1 - Statewide Planning Technology, and Society, Apr 141993, Washington, DC. Pp 376-380. VDOT's IVES program, Virginia PROGRESS, is centered around four areas of concentration: Advanced Traveler Information Systems (ATIS), Advanced Traffic Management Systems (ATMS), Automated Highway Systems (AHS), and Commercial Vehicle Operations (CVO). Specfic goals are defined for each concentration area in the short-term, middle-term, and long-term phases of the program. These goals will be utilized to provide direction for the program, serving as catalysts for more detailed definitions of systems and projects. Finally, an organizational structure is detailed which will support the implementation of the plan. Virginia. 1-193. Vision 2020: Alternatives For the Future. Binkley, Lisa S. (Wisconsin Department of Transportation, Madison, Wl). Presented to Transportation Planning Methods Applications Conference, Apr 171995, Seattis, Washington. Dane County is Wisconsin's fastest growing county. is home to urban and rural communities, and everything in between. The 60 often-competing local governments, including the County Board and County Executive, are all very divided over land use - a primary source of travel growth. Dane County also has high~uality highways and one of the nation's best transit systems. But these highways are seen as a cause of sprawl; and the transit system is seen as inadequate to attract development to the central urban area. It is in this setting that the Wisconsin Department of Transportation (DOT) entered into a comprehensive land use and transportation planning process with Dane County, the City of Madison, and the Dane County Regional Planning Commission (RPC). The three-year process is called Vision 2020. Vision 2020 officially began in May 1994, when the project sponsors hired a transportation and land use consultant team to help the sponsors: 1 ) design and conduct an extensive public participation process; 2) develop feasible, detailed, and distinct alternative future land use scenarios: 3) estimate the travel demand generated by each scenario; 4) develop alternative, multimodal transportation systems to serve each land use scenario; 5) analyze the full range of impacts of combined land use-transportation scenarios; 6) identify the policies necessary to implement each scenario; 7) select a preferred land use-transportation scenario; and 8) develop the first Dane County Land Use and Transportation Plan based on that scenario. The process has been and will continue to be both challenging and contentious for a number of reasons, including the following: 1) The project is being sponsored by diverse agencies. DOT and the RPC are splitting the funding, but the City and County are clearly central de~sion-makers in the process. 2) DOT is providing guidance in the process, but does not want to overstep its role as a state agency in directing a local planning effort. DOTs primary concern is meeting ISTEA requirementsfor updating the regional transportation plan. 3) the sponsors had very different objectives in selecting consultants. After months of heated negotiations, the sponsors compromised on a transportation and land use consultant team. 4) There are also peripheral issues influencing Vision 2020 including debate over plans to improve a rural two-lane highway and merging the RPC staff and County planning staff. Vision 2020 will certainly be filled with very public debate about both process and product. But the potential outcome is significant. If the sponsors are able to obtain high levels of focused public discussion about the alternative land use and transportation scenarios, the community has the potential to develop and adopt a consensus plan on how to accommodate the substantial land development and travel growth anticipated in Dane County over the next 25 years. Wisconsin. 1-194. Washington's Transportation Future. 1990 Report to the Washington State Leglislature: Transportation Policy Planning for Washington State. Washington State Department of Transportation. Olympia, WA: Jan 1990. Washi ngton. 1-195. Washington State Freight Truck Origin and Destination Study: Methods, Procedures, and Data Dictionary. Gillis, William R. (The Gillis Group, Olympia, WA) and Kenneth L. Casavant (Washington State University, Pullman, WA). Dec 1994, EWITS Research Report Number 3. Washington. 1-196. What is Minnesota Getting for Its Tax Dollars? Streets and Highways. Minnesota Office of the State Auditor. (St Paul, MN). Jul 1 1993. State and local governments in Minnesota have a reputation for spending well above the national average for public services. The purpose of this project is to ask: What is Minnesota getting for its higher than average government spending? If Minnesota's state and local governments are spending more than other states and the national average, how do the nature and amount of services provided by Minnesota's state and local governments differ from other states? This project consists of a series of reports. This report focuses on highways. Highways account for 92% of Minnesota's total transportation spending. This report is intended to provide state and local policy makers and 35

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Pro ject Bibliography - NCHRP 8-32 (1 ) Minnesota citizens with the information necessary to formulate their own thoughts and recommendations on Minnesota's spending for streets and highways. The report is organized as follows: Executive Summary; Project Overview; Background; Minnesota's Road System; Minnesota's Spending for Streets and Highways; What Is Minnesota Getting for Its Highway Spending - The Lowest Percent of All Types of Roads with Poor Pavement Conditions, More Roads with Lane Widths of 12 Feet or More, A Smaller Percent of Deficient Bridges, Congestion for Most Urban Highways At or Below the Average for Other States, and Roads That Are Among the Safest in the Nation; and Appendices. Minnesota. 1-197. What's Transportation Got to Do With It? An Introduction to the Washington State Department of Transportation. Washington State Department of Transportation. (Olympia, WA). Washington. 1-198. What We're Learning in Developing and Implementing Our Congestion and Intermodal Management Systems. Altenstadter, Jim. (Arizona Department of Transportation, Tucson, AZ). Submitted to Transportation Planning Methods Applications Conference, Apr 17 1995, Seattle, Washington. 1-199. Where Will We Get the Transportation Engineers and Planners of Tomorrow? Hoel, Lester A.; Francis B. Francois, and George R. Lloyd. Transportation Research Record 1243: Future of Statewide Transportation Planning. 1989. 1-200. Who Ever Said MIS Was Easy? A Major Investment Study in Southeast Florida. Seeburger, Scott P. (Florida Department of Transportation, Ft. Lauderdale, FL). Submitted to Transportation Planning Methods Applications Conference, Apr 171995, Seattle, Washington. Florida. 1-201. Wisconsin Bicycle Planning Guidea Wisconsin Department of Transportation. Sep 1993. Guidelines for Metropolitan Planning Organizations and Communities in Planning and Developing Bicycle Facilities. Wisconsin. 1 -202. Wisconsin Freight Forum: A Summary of the Key Issues Discussed. Wisconsin Freight Shippers and Operators. On April 7, 1993, the Secretary of the Wisconsin Department of Transportation (~'sDOT), Charles H. Thompson, convened a meeting of some forty Wisconsin shippers, transportation operators and WisDOT staff to discuss issues and trends in Wisconsin's rapidly changing freight environment. This "Freight Forum" was prompted by provisions of the federal Intermodal Surface Transportation Efficiency Act requiring the development of a State Multimodal Transportation Plan addressing both freight and passenger transportation issues. Discussion at the forum was facilitated by Mr. Alan Pisarski, a nationally recruited transportation consultant from Falls Church, Virginia. In initiating the freight element of this plan, freight shippers and operators were asked to assist the Secretary and his staff in developing a real world vision of what the future might resemble for freight transportatio in Wisconsin. Their thoughts are summarized in this report. In preparation participants were asked to consider the following four questions prior to the April 7, Freight Forum: What is your statewide vision of the freight transportation system required for each mode, highway, rail, port and airport that will meet ~sconsin's multimodal transportation needs by the year 2020? In particular, what key differences do you think will emerge between Wisconsin's freight system of today, compared to what will evolve in the next 30 years? What kinds of public-private partnerships will be required to achieve your vision of the year 2020 freight transportation system described above? What are the most significant emerging trends that will impact your company's transportation activities or requirements? Key areas of discussion were assembled into the following report based on the collaborative responses of the Freight Forum participants. The first section of the report describes the broad issues faced by freight shippers and operators today. Ensuing sections summarize discussion points focused on specific modes including: freight rail, truckin, intermodal, ports, and air cargo. Wisconsin. 1-203. Wisconsin Public Participation Process for Metropolitan Planning and Programming. Wisconsin Pedestrian Planning Guideline. Wisconsin Department of Transportation. Sep 1993. Guidelines for Metropolitan Planning Organizations and Communities in Planning and Developing Pedestrian Facilities. Wisconsin. 1-204. Wisconsin Transit Planning Forum: A Summary of the Key Issues Discussed. Wisconsin Department of Transportation. Wisconsin. 1-205. Within Our Means. 36

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Section 1 - Statewide Planning Pile, Deborah; J. H. Fonkert; Mark Larson; Steve Reckers; Ray Lewis; R. Thomas Gillaspy (Minnesota Planning), and Liz Emerson (Minnesota Department of Health). Jan 1995. Minnesota. 1-206. Workshop on Multimodal Transportation Planning Research Needs. Transportation Research Board., In Progress; NCHRP Project 8-32. A recent announcement for a TRB Conference held in Seattle, Washington, July 19-22, 1992, on Transportation Planning, Programming, and Finance includes the following statement of purpose: "Many changes have taken place that have created new challenges for planning and programming decisions in the 1 990's especially the impacts of the recently passed surface transportation legislation that mill greatly impact the planning and programming area. These challenges include (1 ) an increasing emphasis on maintenance and rehabilitation of an aging infrastructure versus new facility expansion, (2) a growing concern with urban and suburban grouch and congestion and the appropriate mix of management and investment actions needed to address it, (3) the impact of the new CIoan Air Act and other environmental considerations, (4) the new Surface Transportation Act including major changes to the federal program structure, federal/state matching ratios for funding, and the definition of the federal aid highway system, (5) funding pressures at all levels of government and the resulting interest in private sector funding sources, and (6) greater emphasis on multimodal issues." In view of these issues, there is a pressing need to improve processes for transportation planning, programming and financing. Research is needed to identify approaches that can be used to address these aspects reflecting each area's particular institutional structure, programming process, system needs, fi nanci al resou roes, and fu nd i ng mechanisms. The objectives of the project vail be to (1) review the emerging issues affecting planning and program decisions, e.g. accommodating environmental criteria and implications of the recent clean air and wetlands requirements; (2) assess current and now approaches to programming and planning including institutional and technical aspects; (3) determine the steps required to address emerging issues; and (4) develop a research action agenda. An important element in this research will involve convening a workshop of trasportation leaders to addressing the issues in an effective manner. The workshop would set the focus of the research efforts. 1-207. The Year 2020. Lockwood, Stephen C. Transportation Research Record 1243: Future of Statewide Transportation Planning. 1989, Pp 9-1 1. This look backwards from the year 2020 sees the eighties and nineties to have been a low point in productivity in the surface transportation sector. The provision of public infrastructure--transportation infrastructure and services, highway and transit--appeared to have been isolated from the economic expression of consumer demand and from effective means of responding innovatively to its market. The key question facing transportation professionals at the close of the twentieth century was, what kind of a transportation system did a postindustrial service economy, geography, and Society really need, and how was society going to shape it and pay for it. Highlights are included of the actual developments that have taken place by the year 2020, which have included such things as the automated vehicle operation that allows both 1 4-year-olds and 84-year- aids to operate vehicles, and the Stratoliner which will carry the author of this paper from his Boston conference in the morning to Paris for his afternoon meeting. 37

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