TABLE 5-2 Use of Technologies and Techniques by Facility Employment Size, 1996

 

Number of Employees

Technologies and Techniques

All Respondents

10 to 49

50 to 499

500+

PCs, non-manufacturing

96%

94%

98%

100%

JIT customers

58%

52%

64%

76%

MRP II

58%

51%

66%

85%

Preventive maintenance

53%

49%

57%

77%

LANs

51%

40%

63%

79%

Employee teams

49%

36%

63%

90%

PCs, shop floor

45%

32%

57%

88%

CAD, CAE

44%

35%

51%

85%

Internet

38%

38%

37%

55%

SPC, SQC

38%

22%

52%

87%

Electronic business transactions

37%

29%

46%

64%

NC, CNC

29%

25%

33%

34%

Data collection devices

27%

12%

42%

76%

CAD; CAM

23%

19%

25%

48%

Manufacturing cells

19%

13%

26%

34%

CIM

16%

11%

21%

40%

Automated material handling

15%

9%

21%

49%

ISO 9000/QS 9000 certification

14%

7%

20%

40%

Automated in-process inspection

11%

6%

14%

42%

Rapid prototyping

10%

9%

12%

13%

Distance learning

5%

2%

7%

26%

ISO 14000 certification

1%

0%

1%

8%

 

Source: Youtie and Shapira, 1997.

reported greater SPC, CAD, CAM, MRP, ISO, and HAZMAT capabilities. Small SMEs considered improvements in payment terms and financing somewhat more important than did large SMEs.

There were few differences between SMEs as a function of concentration of top customers, although a distinct difference was found in the percentage of electronic transactions. SMEs with higher concentrations of top customers had a higher percentage of electronic transactions (15 percent) than those with lower concentrations (7 percent).



The National Academies | 500 Fifth St. N.W. | Washington, D.C. 20001
Copyright © National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.
Terms of Use and Privacy Statement