B Naval Gun, Missile, and Aircraft Ranges

Figure B.1 provides information on the range in nautical miles (NM) for an array of naval guns and missiles, strike radii for aircraft, and ferry radii for air transport of artillery that the Navy and Marine Corps will draw on to support Operational Maneuver From the Sea. Detailed information about each type of equipment is given below in the form of notes keyed to Figure B.1.

  • (1)  

    5-in. 45 guns: in inventory; range maximum, 13 NM; 70-lb shell; magazine, 500 rounds; 20 rounds per minute (RPM). With extended-range guided missile backfit; range extension to 45 NM, ~10 RPM (Friedman, Norman, 1997, ''Section: Shipboard Guns and Gun Systems," The Naval Institute Guide to World Naval Weapons Systems 1997–1998, Naval Institute Press, Annapolis, Md., pp. 460–462; Naval Studies Board, 1997, Technology for the United States Navy and Marine Corps, 2000–2035, Vol. 1: Overview (p. 66) and Vol. 5: Weapons (p. 131), National Academy Press, Washington, D.C.).

  • (2)  

    Extended-range guided missile (ERGM), rocket-assisted projectile (RAP) gun-fired round for 5-in. 62 guns: on new ships; 32-lb payload; magazine, estimated 200 to 250 rounds; 5 to 10 RPM; range, 65 NM; projected range extension to 100 NM (Guarneri, Jack, Applied Physics Laboratory, Johns Hopkins University, 1996, "NSFS Requirements to Support OMFTS," Naval Surface Fire Support Road Map Study, presented to the Panel on Weapons, Technology for Future Naval Forces (TFNF) study, December 9; Kennedy, Floyd D., Jr., 1998, "U.S. Navy Aircraft and Weapon Developments," Naval Institute Proceedings, May, pp. 120–124, 126, 128, and 130; Naval Studies Board, 1997, Technology for the United States Navy and Marine Corps, 2000–2035, Vol. 1:



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--> B Naval Gun, Missile, and Aircraft Ranges Figure B.1 provides information on the range in nautical miles (NM) for an array of naval guns and missiles, strike radii for aircraft, and ferry radii for air transport of artillery that the Navy and Marine Corps will draw on to support Operational Maneuver From the Sea. Detailed information about each type of equipment is given below in the form of notes keyed to Figure B.1. (1)   5-in. 45 guns: in inventory; range maximum, 13 NM; 70-lb shell; magazine, 500 rounds; 20 rounds per minute (RPM). With extended-range guided missile backfit; range extension to 45 NM, ~10 RPM (Friedman, Norman, 1997, ''Section: Shipboard Guns and Gun Systems," The Naval Institute Guide to World Naval Weapons Systems 1997–1998, Naval Institute Press, Annapolis, Md., pp. 460–462; Naval Studies Board, 1997, Technology for the United States Navy and Marine Corps, 2000–2035, Vol. 1: Overview (p. 66) and Vol. 5: Weapons (p. 131), National Academy Press, Washington, D.C.). (2)   Extended-range guided missile (ERGM), rocket-assisted projectile (RAP) gun-fired round for 5-in. 62 guns: on new ships; 32-lb payload; magazine, estimated 200 to 250 rounds; 5 to 10 RPM; range, 65 NM; projected range extension to 100 NM (Guarneri, Jack, Applied Physics Laboratory, Johns Hopkins University, 1996, "NSFS Requirements to Support OMFTS," Naval Surface Fire Support Road Map Study, presented to the Panel on Weapons, Technology for Future Naval Forces (TFNF) study, December 9; Kennedy, Floyd D., Jr., 1998, "U.S. Navy Aircraft and Weapon Developments," Naval Institute Proceedings, May, pp. 120–124, 126, 128, and 130; Naval Studies Board, 1997, Technology for the United States Navy and Marine Corps, 2000–2035, Vol. 1:

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--> FIGURE B.1 Naval fire support for Operational Maneuver From the Sea. Overview (p. 66) and Vol. 5: Weapons (p. 131), National Academy Press, Washington, D.C.). Status: in 6.4 budget. (3)   Vertical gun, advanced system (VGAS) or advanced gun system (AGS): 1 to 2 155-mm vertical guns in vertical launch system (VLS) box; automatic 6 to 24 RPM/gun; RAP with ~100-lb warhead, ~1,500 in SC21 magazine; projected range extension to 200 to 250 NM with 2-stage RAP (Belen, Fred C., 1998, "Tactical Information Technology . . . From the Sea," Naval Institute Proceedings, September, pp. 121–123; Kennedy, Floyd D., Jr., 1998, "Naval Fire Support Plans," Naval Institute Proceedings, June, p. 72; Mullen, RADM Michael, USN, 1998, "Where Surface Warfare Is Headed—and Why," Naval Institute Proceedings, October, p. 79). Status: part of DD21 contract. (4)   Land-attack standard missile (LASM): range, 150 NM; ~300-lb warhead; semiballistic; fired from VLS tubes (CG, 122 tubes; DDG, 90 to 96 tubes; DD, 61 tubes; FFG, 40 tubes; in battle group with 2 CGs, 2 DDGs, DD 485 tubes), flight time, ~5 minutes to 150 NM (Polmar, Norman, 1997, The Naval Institute Guide to the Ships and Aircraft of the U.S. Fleet, Naval Institute Press, Annapolis, Md.). Status: IOC FY 2003, integrated in DDG81 and new CGs. (5)   Tomahawk land attack missile (TLAM): ~3,700 missiles of all types in

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--> inventory; range, 600 to 1,000 NM; 600- to 1,000-lb warhead; fired from VLS ~ Mach 1 (to be upgraded to 1.6), retargetable; flight time, ~15 to 20 minutes to 200 NM (Friedman, Norman. 1997. "Section: Missiles and Guided Bombs," The Naval Institute Guide to World's Naval Weapons Systems 1997–1998, Naval Institute Press, Annapolis, Md., pp. 259–261). (6)   FASTHAWK: Mach 4 to 5, air-breathing hypersonic missile; 700-lb warhead; 700-NM range; VLS-compatible; flight time, ~5 minutes to 200 NM (Dornheim, Michael A. 1997. "Missiles Lead Hypersonics Revival," Aviation Week and Space Technology, 147(15): 62–65). Status: part of High Speed Strike System program, IOC 2006. (7)   AV-8B: 189 in inventory (1998), remanufacturing >72 oldest to reach 150 aircraft inventory; with six 500-lb bombs, two 300-gal tanks, >1.5-hr loiter at 200 NM; typical LHA load, 6 to 8 AV8s (communication from Mr. Mike Thompson, NAVAIR AV8B, program office, November 18, 1998; Taylor, John W.R., and Kenneth Munson [eds.], 1986, "McDonnell Douglas/BAe [AV-8B Harrier II]," Jane's All The World Aircraft, 1986–87, Jane's Publishing Inc., New York, and Jane's Publishing Company Limited, London, pp. 120–122). (8)   F/A-18 C and D operational: 967 in 1996 inventory; E and F: in initial production (12 in January 1999), 548 aircraft planned procurement IOC 2002; three external tanks, strike load of four 1,000-lb bombs, and air-air missiles >1-hr loiter at 200 NM; CVN load (E and F), ~36 increasing to 60 ("F/A-18E/F, Super Hornet Strike Fighter Aircraft," Sea Power, October 1998, p. 36; Finneran, Patrick, and Chuck Allen, 1998, "Super Hornet: The Sailor's Aircraft Is on Track," Naval Institute Proceedings, May, pp. 81–85; Polmar, Norman, 1997, The Naval Institute Guide to the Ships and Aircraft of the U.S. Fleet, Naval Institute Press, Annapolis, Md., pp. 337 and 370; communication from Mr. Robert Walters, NAVAIR F/A 18 program office, October 10, 1998). (9)   Joint strike fighter (JSF): estimated loiter ~1 hr at 200 NM with >13,000-lb external load; 642 aircraft planned (Joint Strike Fighter Program Office, 1998, Joint Strike Fighter Program, September 16, available online at <http://www.jast.mil/html/aboutjsf.htm>; Net Resources International Ltd., 1998, the Website for Defence Industries—Navy; Current Projects: JSF, available online at <http://www.naval-technology.com/projects/jsf/index.html>). Status: IOC 2008. (10)   MV-22 for external 10,000-lb load (e.g., LWT 155), radius = 100 NM, estimated speed 250 knots. Status: OPEVAL October 1999. Total planned buy 360. Typical LHA load ~12 aircraft. Escort by AV8B if available (TFNF briefing by V-22 program manager, Col Garner, USMC, October 1996; Kennedy, Floyd D., Jr., 1998, "U.S. Naval Aircraft and Weapon Developments," Naval Institute Proceedings, May, pp. 121–122; discussion with LtGen Philip Shutler, USMC [retired]). (11)   CH-53E (MH-53E): 162 aircraft in inventory; 10,000-lb external load (LWT 155), radius > 200 NM at 130 knots; for CH-53Es escorted by AH-1-type

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--> attack helicopters (225 in inventory, speed 140 knots), combined radius estimated ~120 NM; typical LHA load, 12 aircraft (CH-53-Class desk information sheet; discussions with LtCol R.E. Carney, USMC, MH-53 program manager; Kennedy, Floyd D., Jr., 1998, "U.S. Naval Aircraft and Weapon Developments," Naval Institute Proceedings, May, pp. 120–124, 126, 128, and 130; McAllister, Keith R., 1998, MPF 2010 Ship to Shore Movement and Sea based Logistics Support, Volume I: Report, CRM 98-19.09, Center for Naval Analyses, Alexandria, Va., p. 25; Polmar, Norman, 1997, The Naval Institute Guide to the Ships and Aircraft of the U.S. Fleet, Naval Institute Press, Annapolis, Md., p. 415).