TABLE 4.1 Mobility Needs in the Solar System Exploration Roadmap's Campaigns and Portrait Missions

Campaign

Portrait Mission

Mission Type

Mobility Needs*

Building Blocks and Our Chemical Origins

 

 

 

Pluto/Kuiper Express

Multi-Body Visitors

Large Asteroid Orbiter

Small Body Sample Return

Giant Planet Deep Probes

Flyby

Flyby

Orbiter

Sample Return

Entry Probe

Low

Low

Low

Medium

Low

Prebiotic Chemistry in the Outer Solar System

 

 

 

Europa Ocean Explorer

Europa Lander

Titan Biologic Explorer

Orbiter

Lander

Aerobot

Low

Medium

High

Formation and Dynamics of Earth-like Planets

 

 

 

Lunar Giant Basin Sample Return

Mars Surface Network

Venus Surface Mission

Io Volcanic Observer

Mercury Orbiter

Sample Return

Landers

Landers/Aerobots

Orbiter

Orbiter

Medium

Low

High

Low

Low

Evolution of Earth-like Environments

 

 

 

Mars Water-Mineralogy Mapper

Mars Mobile Sciences Lab

First Mars Sample Return

Advanced Mars Sample Return

Mars Geosciences Aerobot

Venus Geosciences Aerobot

Orbiter

Lander/Rover

Sample Return

Sample Return/Rover

Aerobot

Aerobot

Low

High

High

High

High

High

Astrophysical Analogs in the Solar System

 

 

 

Outer Planet Multiprobes

Jupiter Polar Orbiter

Neptune Orbiter/Triton Flyby

Saturn Ring Observer

Mercury Magnetospheric Multi-Satellites

Entry Probe

Orbiter

Orbiter

Orbiter

Orbiter

Low

Low

Low

Low

Low

* Low, little or no mobility required; medium, robotic arms or other types of sample collection devices needed; high, mobile platform equipped with sophisticated instrumentation required.

the main thrusts of technical development, especially of rovers, are directed at reducing their size and increasing their autonomy. If size reduction also results in a corresponding reduction in range or other capabilities, it will, potentially, have a significant scientific impact. This is so because it creates a capability to make scientific measurements on a scale size that is not necessarily optimal for addressing the scientific questions to be answered.

The pattern of planetary exploration to date has been to make basic observations of planetary surfaces from orbiters and to establish hypotheses for interpreting these observations. These hypotheses are then tested by more directed observations and measurements. Because the hypotheses are based on orbital images with a relatively low characteristic resolution, this suggests that long-range traverses are required to test the relevant hypotheses. However, the focus of technical developments appears to be to create mobility systems capable of producing very detailed, but limited, data sets about very small areas. Thus, we run the danger of creating a technical capability to address scientific issues that might not, necessarily, relate to the framework of scientific questions and issues



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