Appendix C:
Biographical Sketches of Members of the Committee on Undergraduate Science Education (CUSE)

Current Members

Marye Anne Fox (NAS*), North Carolina State University and CUSE Chair, is Chancellor of North Carolina State University in Raleigh, NC. Prior to assuming the Chancellorship position, Dr. Fox was Vice President for Research and the M. June and J. Virgil Waggoner Regents Chair in Chemistry at the University of Texas at Austin. Her recent research activities include organic photochemistry, electrochemistry, and physical organic mechanisms. She is a former associate editor of the Journal of the American Chemical Society. Previously, she was the director of the Center for Fast Kinetics Research, vice chair of the National Science Board, and a member of the Task Force on Alternative Futures for the Department of Energy National Laboratories, the Galvin Committee. Dr. Fox is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and serves on several NAS and NRC committees. In addition to her role as Chair of the Committee on Undergraduate Science Education, she serves on the NAS Council Executive Committee and the Committee on Science, Engineering, and Public Policy. Dr. Fox is a former member of the Commission on Physical Sciences, Mathematics, and Applications and served on the Committee on Criteria for Federal Support of Research and Development. She received a Ph.D. in organic chemistry from Dartmouth College.

Mary P. Colvard, Cobleskill-Richmondville High School, is a biology and research teacher at Cobleskill-Richmondville High School in Cobleskill, New York. She has taught there for the past eight years and prior to that was for 20 years a science teacher and department chair at Sidney High School. Ms. Colvard presently serves as Region II Coordinator for the National Association of Biology Teachers and Director at Large for Biology for the Science Teachers Association of New York State. She is also a member of the board of directors of the Health, Safety, and Research Alliance for New York State. Other professional affiliations include membership in the American Society for Microbiology and the National Science Teachers Association. Ms. Colvard has authored many labs for the Howard Hughes Medical Institute-funded Cornell Institute for Biology Teachers and has served as a summer instructor for the program. She has been a contributing author to several high school science textbooks. Ms. Colvard received a B.S.Ed in biology from the State University of New York at Geneseo and her M.S.Ed in secondary biology from the State University of New York at Oneonta. She has completed additional graduate work at Binghamton University and Cornell University.

Arthur B. Ellis, University of Wisconsin, Madison, is Meloche-Bascom Professor of Chemistry at the University of Wisconsin, Madison. He conducts research in the interdisciplinary field of materials science and

*  

NAS: Member of the National Academy of Sciences



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--> Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Members of the Committee on Undergraduate Science Education (CUSE) Current Members Marye Anne Fox (NAS*), North Carolina State University and CUSE Chair, is Chancellor of North Carolina State University in Raleigh, NC. Prior to assuming the Chancellorship position, Dr. Fox was Vice President for Research and the M. June and J. Virgil Waggoner Regents Chair in Chemistry at the University of Texas at Austin. Her recent research activities include organic photochemistry, electrochemistry, and physical organic mechanisms. She is a former associate editor of the Journal of the American Chemical Society. Previously, she was the director of the Center for Fast Kinetics Research, vice chair of the National Science Board, and a member of the Task Force on Alternative Futures for the Department of Energy National Laboratories, the Galvin Committee. Dr. Fox is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and serves on several NAS and NRC committees. In addition to her role as Chair of the Committee on Undergraduate Science Education, she serves on the NAS Council Executive Committee and the Committee on Science, Engineering, and Public Policy. Dr. Fox is a former member of the Commission on Physical Sciences, Mathematics, and Applications and served on the Committee on Criteria for Federal Support of Research and Development. She received a Ph.D. in organic chemistry from Dartmouth College. Mary P. Colvard, Cobleskill-Richmondville High School, is a biology and research teacher at Cobleskill-Richmondville High School in Cobleskill, New York. She has taught there for the past eight years and prior to that was for 20 years a science teacher and department chair at Sidney High School. Ms. Colvard presently serves as Region II Coordinator for the National Association of Biology Teachers and Director at Large for Biology for the Science Teachers Association of New York State. She is also a member of the board of directors of the Health, Safety, and Research Alliance for New York State. Other professional affiliations include membership in the American Society for Microbiology and the National Science Teachers Association. Ms. Colvard has authored many labs for the Howard Hughes Medical Institute-funded Cornell Institute for Biology Teachers and has served as a summer instructor for the program. She has been a contributing author to several high school science textbooks. Ms. Colvard received a B.S.Ed in biology from the State University of New York at Geneseo and her M.S.Ed in secondary biology from the State University of New York at Oneonta. She has completed additional graduate work at Binghamton University and Cornell University. Arthur B. Ellis, University of Wisconsin, Madison, is Meloche-Bascom Professor of Chemistry at the University of Wisconsin, Madison. He conducts research in the interdisciplinary field of materials science and *   NAS: Member of the National Academy of Sciences

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--> has led an effort to develop instructional materials for integrating this field into the chemistry curriculum. Dr. Ellis leads the College Level One Team of the National Science Foundation-supported National Institute for Science Education (NISE), which is examining ways to make introductory college science, mathematics, engineering and technology courses more effective. He also serves on the Committee on Undergraduate Science Education of the National Research Council. Dr. Ellis received a B.S. in chemistry from Caltech in 1973, and his Ph.D. degree in inorganic chemistry from MIT in 1977. Dorothy Gabel, Indiana University, is a professor in the School of Education at Indiana University and the coordinator of science education. She presently teaches and supervises a required introductory science course for prospective elementary teachers entitled ''Introduction to Scientific Inquiry." Dr. Gabel's specialty is in chemistry education, and she is the author of numerous research papers in this area and of a high school chemistry text. She was the editor of The Handbook of Research on Science Teaching and Learning and has served as president of the Hoosier Science Teachers Association, the School Science and Mathematics Association, and the National Association for Research in Science Teaching Association. James M. Gentile, Hope College, received a B.A. in biology from St. Mary's College (MN) in 1968, and his M.S. (1970) and Ph.D. (1974) degrees in genetics from Illinois State University. From 1974-1976 he worked as a postdoctoral research associate in the Department of Human Genetics at the Yale University School of Medicine. He was appointed assistant professor of biology at Hope College in 1976 and was promoted to associate professor in 1982 and to full professor in 1984. In 1984 Dr. Gentile was also awarded an endowed chair and distinguished scholar position in the biological sciences at Hope College, an honor he holds to this day. Dr. Gentile also twice held appointments as adjunct professor of genetics at the University of Illinois (1983-84; 1985-86). In 1986, Dr. Gentile was appointed chair of the biology department at Hope College, and in 1988 he was appointed to his present position as dean for the natural sciences at Hope College. Dr. Gentile's research investigates ways in which plant and animal cells metabolize xenobiotic agents into forms that can cause mutations in host or target cells. His current research efforts are focused on ways infectious agents work to enhance neoplastic risk in mammalian organisms. Since 1976 over 100 undergraduate students have conducted research with Dr. Gentile. He has authored or co-authored 65 peer-reviewed publications since 1973. Dr. Gentile has a long listing of honors and special appointments. He has been a panelist for the NIH/NTP three times (1985-88; 1989-91; 1996-98) a consultant to a WHO Advisory Group (1983-85), a NIEHS Superfund panelist (1987-89) and a team leader for an internal NIOSH review panel (1990). Dr. Gentile has also served on an International Committee for the Protection Against Environmental Mutagens and Carcinogens Task Force (198691), an International Agency for Research on Cancer Panel (1995), and as a consultant to the USEPA Science Advisory Board (1988-95). He has served as a consultant to over 50 academic institutions in the past 20 years, as a consultant to 10 different industries since 1980, and is a science consultant to the Murdock Trust. Dr. Gentile is a member of the executive committee of Project Kaleidoscope (PKAL), an NSF-sponsored national organization focused on enhancing science and mathematics education in the U.S. and he has served as an elected councilor for the Council on Undergraduate Research (CUR). He was chair of the Program Committee for the 1993 annual meeting of the Environmental Mutagen Society (EMS) and has served as president of the society (1993-95). Dr. Gentile was the book review editor for the journal Environmental and Molecular Mutagenesis, and has served on the

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--> editorial review board for that journal, for Revista Genetica, the CUR Newsletter, and Mutation Research. Dr. Gentile is currently the managing editor of Mutation Research: Fundamental and Molecular Mechanisms of Mutations and executive managing editor of Mutation Research. Ronald J. Henry, Georgia State University, is the provost and vice president for Academic Affairs at Georgia State University (since July, 1994). One of his responsibilities is to develop Georgia State into a premier urban research university. Another responsibility is leadership to promote and recommend changes in public education systems that will improve student success at all levels, preschool through postsecondary (P-16) education, and into the world of work. Previously, he served as chief academic officer for Miami University (Ohio) and Auburn University. Dr. Henry serves as a member of the Georgia P16 Council. He served as an evaluator on the 1995 Education Pilot Evaluation Team of the Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Award and as an Examiner on the 1996 Board of Examiners. Dr. Henry received B.Sc. and Ph.D. degrees in applied mathematics from Queen's University, Belfast, in 1961 and 1964, respectively. Harvey B. Keynes, University of Minnesota, is a professor of mathematics, past director of education in the Geometry Center, and director of the (science/engineering school) Institute of Technology Center for Educational Programs. His research interests are in dynamical systems and mathematics education. Professor Keynes directs the following projects: The University of Minnesota Talented Youth Mathematics Program, (UMTYMP-state and private funding); the National Science Foundation Mathematicians and Education Reform Network; the NSF Young Scholars Project; the Bush Foundation Project to increase female participation in UMTYMP; the NSF-funded Early Alert Initiative; and a new reformed calculus program for University of Minnesota engineering students. Professor Keynes also has taught in the University of Minnesota Talented Youth Program and has developed a new masters program in mathematics that includes secondary teaching certification. He has extensive contacts in Minnesota and national mathematics education and high technology committees, as well as membership in committees of major mathematics organizations and projects. He was a member of the NRC's Mathematical Sciences Education Board and is the recipient of the 1992 Award for Distinguished Public Service of the American Mathematical Society. Professor Keynes obtained his B.S. and M.A. degrees in mathematics from the University of Pennsylvania in 1962/63 and his Ph.D. in mathematics from Wesleyan University in 1966. Paul J. Kuerbis, The Colorado College, is a professor of education at The Colorado College in Colorado Springs. He has been at the college since 1973 and teaches in both the elementary and secondary licensure programs. He founded and directs the Master of Arts in Teaching Secondary Science program that leads to Colorado licensure and the Master of Arts in Teaching Integrated Natural Sciences program for experienced teachers. From 1989-92, he was director of curriculum and instruction for the National Center for Improving Science Education (NCISE), funded initially by the U.S. Department of Education. He is the current past president of the Association for the Education of Teachers in Science (AETS) and serves on the editorial board of the Journal of Science Teacher Education. He was a member of the National Research Council's (NRC) working group on science teaching standards and a contributing author to the National Science Education Standards. Professor Kuerbis received his B.A. in biology from St. Mary's College (California) in 1964, his masters in zoology from U.C.L.A. in 1966, and his Ph.D. in science education from the University of California, Berkeley (1976). He has taught science at the middle, high school, and community college levels, and at The Colorado College.

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--> R. Heather Macdonald, College of William and Mary, is associate professor of geology at the College of William and Mary, where she recently served as dean of Undergraduate Studies, Arts and Sciences. She is a past-president of the National Association of Geoscience Teachers (NAGT) and currently co-coordinates NAGT workshops on innovative and effective teaching in the geosciences. She also serves on the education committee of the Geological Society of America and the K-12 Earth Science Education Committee of the Society for Sedimentary Geology. She received the Biggs Earth Science Teaching Award from the Geological Society of America and the Thomas Jefferson Teaching Award from the College of William and Mary. Dr. Macdonald received a B.A. in geology from Carleton College in 1976 and her M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in geology from the University of Wisconsin, Madison, in 1979 and 1984, respectively. Edward E. Penhoet, Chiron Corporation, is President and CEO of Chiron. He is a leader in the field of biotechnology. He has been CEO of Chiron since co-founding the company in 1981. From 1971-1981, Dr. Penhoet was a faculty member of the biochemistry department at the University of California, Berkeley, and continues as an adjunct. He also is a member of the Scientific Advisory Board to the U.S. Congress and has testified regarding the biotechnology industry and the role of federal funding in support of basic research. Grace McWhorter, Lawson State Community College, was named chairperson of the Natural Science Department of Lawson State Community College in 1993. She is project site director for the Biomedical Bridge to the Baccalaureate Degree Program. Funding from the National Institutes of Health supports this project. She serves as chair of the State of Alabama's Master Teacher Plan and is chair for chemistry on the State Articulation Committee. Dr. McWhorter has played a key role in the planning and development of the state's Teaching and Learning Symposium (1995-1998). Dr. McWhorter is the recipient of several prestigious awards, including the Distinguished Service Award from Florida A&M University; Outstanding Alumnus Award in Agriculture from Tuskegee University; and the Chancellor's Award for Outstanding Faculty from the Alabama College System. Prior to joining the faculty at Lawson State, Dr. McWhorter was a faculty member at several institutions, including the University of Missouri at St. Louis, Jacksonville State University, and the University of Texas at San Antonio. Dr. McWhorter received both B.S. and M.S. degrees in horticulture/plant and soil science from Tuskegee Institute (University). She earned her Ph.D. in plant pathology/ botany from the University of Florida in 1978 and the Master of Divinity from Besson Divinity School at Samford University in 1992. She is a member of the Alabama Academy of Science and the National Association of Biology Teachers. James W. Serum, Hewlett-Packard Company, is a senior scientist for Hewlett-Packard Company in the Chemical Analysis Group in Wilmington, Delaware. In this capacity, he is responsible for exploration of advanced technologies for chemical measurement systems. He has held numerous scientific and management positions during his 24 years at HP, including group R&D manager and general manager of Scientific Instruments Division. Dr. Serum serves on a variety of scientific and educational boards and National Research Council committees, including, the committee for the National Digital Library, and the panel for Chemical Science and Technology (NIST). In addition, he is a member of the board of advisors for the Center for Photochemical Sciences at Bowling Green State University. Dr. Serum received a B.A. in chemistry from Hope College and a Ph.D. degree in organic chemistry from the University of Colorado. Elaine Seymour, University of Colorado, Boulder, is the director of ethnography and evaluation research in the Bureau of

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--> Sociological Research, the University of Colorado, Boulder. She has also served as senior scientist at the National Institute for Science Education, the University of Madison, Wisconsin, as a member of the "College Level One" team. The work of her research unit is mainly concerned with aspects of change in the education and career paths of undergraduate and graduate science, mathematics, and engineering (SME) majors. Recent research includes a major national study of reasons why SME undergraduates leave the sciences and special studies of women, students of color, and students with disabilities in these fields. She is the co-evaluator of two NSF consortia for the reform of undergraduate chemistry (shared with the University of California, Berkeley), with a focus on the processes of change among students, faculty, and departments. This work has led to cross-initiative work, including the development of a field-tested web-site collection of student learning assessment tools developed by and for faculty involved in the reform of curriculum and pedagogy. Dr. Seymour offers evaluation workshops and consulting for a number of other SME education reform initiatives. She has over 30 years of experience in teaching, curriculum development, research, and evaluation. Her undergraduate honours degree (in economics and political science) was awarded by the University of Keele, England, a masters of education by the University of Glasgow, Scotland, and her Ph.D. in sociology (with a specialty in medical sociology) by the University of Colorado, Boulder. Christy Vogel, Cabrillo College, is a chemistry instructor at Cabrillo College, a community college located on the Central Coast of California. Her experience with undergraduate science education began at Fort Lewis College, a four-year college in Colorado. In the process of obtaining her B.S. in chemistry, she was employed as a lab assistant, departmental tutor, and summer research assistant at Fort Lewis College. This positive experience with both teaching and research as an undergraduate inspired her to continue her education at the University of Southern California, where she received her Ph.D. in physical chemistry in 1990. Upon completion of her doctoral degree, Dr. Vogel returned to teaching. She enjoys teaching at a community college because it is an opportunity to return what she received as an undergraduate-science education that is affordable, competitive, and personal. Dr. Vogel has participated in programs such as CAMPS and MESA and is currently the faculty adviser for ACCESS. All of these programs are dedicated to increasing diversity in the sciences. She is one of the authors of the American Chemical Society's standardized General Chemistry I exam (1996). Her current projects include small-scale laboratory experiments and developing an "Art in Chemistry" course for non-science majors. David Wilkinson (NAS*), Princeton University. After a brief lectureship at the University of Michigan, Dr. Wilkinson moved to Princeton in 1963, becoming a professor of physics in 1972. He chaired the Physics Department from 1987 to 1990. Early in his career, he received a Sloan Foundation fellowship and a Guggenheim fellowship. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences, a fellow of the American Physical Society, and a member of the American Astronomical Society. His research interests include gravitation and relativity, primeval galaxies, and cosmic microwave radiation. He was a principal researcher for the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) and a member of the Microwave Anisotropy Project (MAP) team. Former Members** C. Bradley Moore (NAS*), University of California, Berkeley, and Past CUSE Chair, is professor of chemistry at the University of California at Berkeley and director of the **   These former members of CUSE participated in the development of this report and have approved its contents.

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--> Chemical Sciences Division at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. He also has served as chair of the Department of Chemistry and dean of the College of Chemistry at Berkeley. His many research interests include molecular energy transfer, the dynamics of chemical reactions, photochemistry, and spectroscopy. His research, including pioneering work on vibrational energy transfer among the modes of polyatomic molecules using laser methods, was recognized by the National Academy of Sciences, where he has been a member since 1986. His research also has been recognized by prizes and awards from the American Physical Society and the American Photochemical Society. He is the editor of Chemical and Biochemical Applications of Lasers and a member of the editorial board for Laser Chemistry. Dr. Moore has served on numerous disciplinary and education committees and boards of the National Research Council. His service to chemistry committees has included the Panel for Chemical Physics; the Committee on Atomic, Molecular, and Optical Sciences; and the AFOSR Chemical Sciences Review Panel. Committee assignments in education include the CUSE (chair from the committee's inception in 1993 until 1997), the advisory board to the NRC's Center for Science, Mathematics, and Engineering Education, the Committee on Information Technology, and the working group on Science Content Standards for the National Science Education Standards. Dr. Moore received his B.A. from Harvard University and his Ph.D. from the University of California at Berkeley. Isaac Abella, University of Chicago, is professor of physics at the University of Chicago. His field is non-linear optical physics, ultra-fast transient phenomena, and laser interactions in atoms and ions in solids. He received a B.A. in physics and astronomy from the University of Toronto, and M.A. and Ph.D. in Physics from Columbia University, where he worked under Professor Charles H. Townes. He has been a fellow at the Joint Institute for Laboratory Astrophysics in Boulder, Colorado; visiting scientist at the Optical Sciences Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC; guest scientist at National Bureau of Standards (NIST), Time & Frequency Division, Boulder Labs; and research fellow at Argonne National Laboratory. He has served as a member of the Education Committee of the American Physical Society; chair of Education Committee of Laser Science Topical Group, (APS); chair, Isaakson Prize Committee, American Physical Society (APS); and member of the National Science Standards Working Group of the National Research Council. He is a fellow of the APS and of the Optical Society of America and president of the Chicago Chapter of Sigma Xi. He was awarded the Quantrell Prize for Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching at Chicago. He is the resident master of the largest college residence hall at the University of Chicago. Neal Abraham, DePauw University, is Vice-President for Academic Affairs and Dean of Faculty. He was the Rachel C. Hale Professor of the Sciences and Mathematics and Professor of Physics at Bryn Mawr College. A fellow of the American Physical Society, Optical Society of America, and the American Association for the Advancement of Science, with research interests in laser physics and nonlinear dynamics, Dr. Abraham has been actively involved in science education reform through the American Association of Physics Teachers, the Association of American Colleges, and Project Kaleidoscope (since its inception in 1989). Dr. Abraham coordinated regional PKAL workshops on maintaining a research-rich environment (1987) and on reforming introductory mathematics and science courses (1993). He currently serves as a mentor in PKAL's Faculty for the 21st Century program. He served as a founding member CUSE and is a co-author of its handbook, Science Teaching Reconsidered. He also served as president of the Council on Undergraduate Research from 1997-1998 and as chair of the Governing Board of the National Conferences on Undergraduate Research from 1990-1992.

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--> George R. Boggs, Palomar College, is the superintendent/president of Palomar College, a comprehensive community college located in San Marcos, California. Dr. Boggs is a commissioner for the Accrediting Commission for Community and Junior Colleges of the Western Association of Schools and Colleges. He has served on the boards of directors of the California Association of Community Colleges, the Community College League of California, and the American Association of Community Colleges, where he was board chair in 1993/94. He is a member of the Advisory Committee for Education and Human Resources for the National Science Foundation (NSF) and has served on several NSF panels. Dr. Boggs is a former chemistry instructor. He is the author of more than 30 articles and chapters in professional journals and books. Denice D. Denton, University of Washington, is the dean of engineering and a professor in the department of electrical engineering at the University of Washington. She received the B.S., M.S. (1982), and Ph.D. (1987) in electrical engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Her current interests include plasma deposition of polymers and the use of micro machining in solid state actuator design. Professor Denton was co-director of the National Institute for Science Education in 1995-1996. She is a recipient of the National Science Foundation Presidential Young Investigator Award (1987-1992), the American Society of Engineering Education AT&T Foundation Teaching Award (1991), the W.M. Keck Foundation Engineering Teaching Excellence Award (1994), the American Society of Electrical Engineers George Westinghouse Award (1995), and the Institute of Electronic and Electrical Engineering Harriet B. Rigas Teaching Award (1995). Dr. Denton is the chair of the NRC's Board on Engineering Education. Michael P. Doyle, Research Corporation, has served as the Dr. D.R. Semmes Distinguished Professor of Chemistry at Trinity University in San Antonio. He has received many awards for his work, including the Catalyst Award of the CMA and the ACS Award. Dr. Doyle is a member of the AAAS, the American Society of Biological Chemists, and the NIH. Ramesh Gangolli, University of Washington, is professor of the mathematics department at the University of Washington. After receiving his Ph.D. in mathematics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and teaching there for two years, Dr. Gangolli has been a visiting professor at many institutions, in addition to his years at the University of Washington. He is widely published in the field of mathematics, and has received awards from the Sloan Fellowship and NSF, among other foundations, organizations, and agencies. He has served on the advisory committee on Mathematical Sciences for the NSF, and is associate editor of the Journal of the Indian Mathematical Society. Dr. Gangolli was a founding member of the CUSE. Frederick T. Graybeal, ASARCO Incorporated, is chief geologist for ASARCO Incorporated, an international mining company. His responsibilities involve the worldwide review of geological environments for future exploration programs, introduction of new exploration concepts and technologies, and evaluation of acquisition opportunities. He worked previously for American and Canadian exploration companies and was an instructor for one year in the Department of Geology at the University of Arizona. He is a former vice president of the Society of Economic Geologists and serves on the advisory committee for the Department of Geosciences at the University of Arizona. Dr. Graybeal received an A.B. in geology from Dartmouth College in 1960 and M.S. (1962) and Ph.D. (1973) degrees in geology from the University of Arizona. Norman Hackerman (NAS*), The Robert A. Welch Foundation, served as president of Rice University from 1970-1985 and holds the title of president emeritus and distinguished professor emeritus of chemistry at

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--> Rice University. Prior to going to Rice, Dr. Hackerman spent 25 years at The University of Texas, Austin, where he joined the faculty as an assistant professor of chemistry in 1945 and progressed to president in 1967. He is now professor emeritus of chemistry at The University of Texas at Austin. He received his A.B. and Ph.D. degrees from Johns Hopkins University. He taught chemistry at Loyola College and Virginia Polytechnic and worked as a research chemist for Colloid Corporation, Kellex Corporation, and the U.S. Coast Guard. Dr. Hackerman was a member of the National Science Board from 1968 to 1980 and chairman from 1975 to 1980. He was the editor of the Journal of the Electrochemical Society from 1969 to 1989. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences, the American Philosophical Society, and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He belongs to numerous scientific organizations. He is author or co-author of 225 publications. In addition to several previous awards, Dr. Hackerman received the American Institute of Chemists Gold Medal in March 1978, the Mirabeau B. Lamar Award of the Association of Texas College and Universities in 1981, the Distinguished Alumnus Award from Johns Hopkins University in 1982, Edward Goodrich Acheson Award of the Electrochemical Society in 1984, the Alumni Gold Medal for distinguished service to Rice University in 1984, Charles Lathrop Parsons Award of the American Chemical Society in 1987, the AAAS-Philip Hauge Abelson Prize in 1987, the Vannevar Bush Award of the National Science Board in 1993, and the National Medal of Science in 1993. Dr. Hackerman serves as chairman of the Scientific Advisory Board of The Robert A. Welch Foundation. John K. Haynes, Morehouse College, serves as the David Packard Professor in Science and chair of Biology at Morehouse College. He received his B.S. from Morehouse in 1964 and his Ph.D. in Developmental Biology from Brown University in 1970. His research interests include regulation of cell volume in elasmobranchs and biochemical characterization of sickle cell membranes. Eileen Delgado Johann, Miami-Dade Community College, is currently a professor of chemistry at Miami-Dade Community College, where she has been a full-time faculty member for 21 years. She has participated in numerous college activities, including the legislative committee and the student services committee. Dr. Johann has created interactive multimedia presentations in chemistry and nutrition and is the co-author of the nursing chemistry module series (inorganic, organic and biochemistry). Her professional affiliations include the Florida Association of Community Colleges, Two-Year College Chemistry Conference, American Chemical Society, and the College Hispanic Council. William E. Kirwan, Ohio State University, is President of Ohio State University. Dr. Kirwan received his bachelor's degree from the University of Kentucky in 1960, and his master's and doctoral degrees from Rutgers in 1962 and 1964, respectively. He joined the University of Maryland as an assistant professor of mathematics in 1964. He was promoted to associate professor in 1968, to full professor in 1972, to chair of the Department of Mathematics in 1977, to vice chancellor for academic affairs in 1981, to provost in 1986, to acting president in August 1988, and to president in February 1989. During his tenure as president, the University of Maryland emphasized undergraduate education, selectively enhanced academic programs, recruited and retained distinguished faculty, achieved diversity goals for underrepresented minority groups, and successfully completed its first capital campaign. While serving as provost in the 1980s, Dr. Kirwan raised admissions standards, increased merit scholarships and graduate fellowships, and established an academic planning process. He is known for his long-range vision and for his talent as a consensus builder. Under his leadership, Maryland undertook a major

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--> restructuring of its academic organization, as well as streamlined its academic offerings, a move made necessary by reduced state support. Dr. Kirwan has regularly found time to teach an undergraduate class. Dr. Kirwan became President of the Ohio State University in 1998. Sharon Long (NAS*), Stanford University, is an Investigator at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute and professor in the Department of Biological Science at Stanford University. Dr. Long is a leader in the identification and characterization of the genes in rhizobia that are involved in the nodulation of leguminous plants. Her group discovered that a flavone (lutiolin) derived from alfalfa seed extracts is necessary for activation of nodulation genes in Rhizobium meliloti. Dr. Long was elected as a member of the National Academy of Sciences in 1993. Dorothy Merritts, Franklin and Marshall College, is chairperson of the environmental studies program and associate professor of geosciences for Franklin and Marshall College. Dr. Merritts has become nationally recognized for her research with undergraduate students and has received numerous grants from the National Science Foundation, Petroleum Research Fund, and U.S. Geological Survey to investigate earthquake and flooding processes in the western and central United States, Alaska, Indonesia, and Costa Rica. Dr. Merritts also has become nationally recognized as an advocate of science literacy at the introductory science course level. She recently completed a textbook in environmental geosciences that uses an Earth Systems approach, and has served on committees that promote the incorporation of an Earth Systems approach into the undergraduate curriculum. Most recently, she served on the NSF- and AGU-supported panel, "Spheres of Influence," which published a document regarding Earth Systems curricula for earth science educators. Dr. Merritts received a B.S. in geology, with minor in mathematics, from Indiana State University in 1980, her M.S. in engineering geology from Stanford University in 1983, and her Ph.D. degree in tectonics, topography, and soils from University of Arizona in 1987. John A. Moore (NAS*), University of California at Riverside, has an extensive history of involvement in educational activities. He began serving on National Research Council education committees in the 1950s and has continued to do so to this day. The more recent ones are the former Coordinating Council for Education, the CUSE, the Committee on Science Education K-12, the National Science Resources Center, and several committees related to NAS projects to produce materials for the K-12 teachers on the evolution/creationism problem. Beginning in the late 1950s, Dr. Moore worked with the Biological Sciences Curriculum Study, first as the chair of the Committee of the Content of the Curriculum Study, then as supervisor for the high school textbook, Biological Science: An Inquiry into Life (for two experimental versions and the first three commercial versions—1961-1973). Later, he worked on many other BSCS projects. Next, he worked on two experimental and three commercial editions of the middle school project, Interactions of Man & the Biosphere (1970-1979). For the university level, he has written Principles of Zoology (1957), Heredity and Development (1963, 1972), and Readings in Heredity and Development (1972). For the university level, he initiated and supervised the Sciences as a Way of Knowing project that consisted of seven yearly symposia and publications (1983-1989). Harvard University Press has published one volume, Science as a Way of Knowing based on this series (1993). For the graduate school level, he edited the 17 volumes of the series, Genes, Cells and Organisms: Great Books in Experimental Biology. He has served on many education committees of the National Science Foundation and the American Association for the Advancement of Science, including Project 2061. Dr. Moore received A.B., M.A., and Ph.D. degrees from

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--> Columbia University and has taught at Brooklyn College, Queens College, Barnard College, Columbia University, and the University of California at Riverside. Penny Moore, Piedmont High School, is a physics and mathematics teacher at Piedmont High School in Piedmont, California. She currently directs PRIME Science, an NSF-funded curriculum materials project that has published an integrated science curriculum for grades 6-10 (Kendall-Hunt). She directed Science for Science Teachers (SST), a program associated with the University of California at Berkeley (UCB) and supported by the National Science Foundation to prepare pre-college science teachers. She has held numerous positions as a presenter, speaker, demonstrator, and leader to address issues in pre-college teacher education. She has published articles on teacher education issues and has participated in several video projects on science education instruction. Ms. Moore earned a B.A. in physics from the University of California at Berkeley, and received her California Life Secondary Teaching Credential at the UCB Graduate Internship Program. She is a member of several advisory boards and committees. W. Ann Reynolds, University of Alabama at Birmingham, is President of the University of Alabama at Birmingham and served as Chancellor of the City University of New York (1990-1997) and as Chancellor of the California State University (1982-1990). Dr. Reynolds held academic rank at the University of California at Los Angeles School of Medicine, as clinical professor of obstetrics and gynecology, and at California State University-Dominguez Hills, as professor of biology. Dr. Reynolds has served on numerous boards, and received honorary degrees from universities that range from the University of Nebraska to Fu Jen Catholic University, Taiwan. She has published both papers and books in her field and is currently a member of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the American Association of Anatomists, and the American Diabetes Association.