Appendix C Members of the Committee

James C. McGroddy, Chair, was a senior vice president at IBM until his retirement at the end of 1996. He is chairman of the board of Integrated Surgical Systems, a major player in the medical robotics field. He also serves as an advisor to several government agencies, as a member of a number of National Research Council panels, and as a visitor and advisor at several universities. As senior vice president, IBM Research, from 1989 to the end of 1995, he was responsible for the work of about 2500 technical professionals in seven research laboratories around the world. Two of these laboratories, in Beijing, China, and in Austin, Texas, were established under his leadership. He was also a member of IBM's Worldwide Management Council and its Corporate Technical Committee. Dr. McGroddy originally joined IBM in its Research Division in 1965 after receiving a Ph.D. in physics from the University of Maryland. He earned his B.S. in physics from St. Joseph's University in Philadelphia in 1958. In his first years at IBM Research he focused on research in solid state physics and electronic devices, and as a result of achievements in these areas was named a fellow of both the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers (IEEE) and the American Physical Society. In the 1970-1971 academic year he was a visiting professor of physics at the Danish Technical University. Returning to IBM, he served in a number of management positions in research, development, and manufacturing before returning to head the Research Division in 1989. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering; chairman of the board of trustees at Phelps Memorial Hospital Center in Sleepy Hollow, New York; and a trustee of the HealthStar Hospital Network, of the Guglielmo Marconi Foundation,



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--> Appendix C Members of the Committee James C. McGroddy, Chair, was a senior vice president at IBM until his retirement at the end of 1996. He is chairman of the board of Integrated Surgical Systems, a major player in the medical robotics field. He also serves as an advisor to several government agencies, as a member of a number of National Research Council panels, and as a visitor and advisor at several universities. As senior vice president, IBM Research, from 1989 to the end of 1995, he was responsible for the work of about 2500 technical professionals in seven research laboratories around the world. Two of these laboratories, in Beijing, China, and in Austin, Texas, were established under his leadership. He was also a member of IBM's Worldwide Management Council and its Corporate Technical Committee. Dr. McGroddy originally joined IBM in its Research Division in 1965 after receiving a Ph.D. in physics from the University of Maryland. He earned his B.S. in physics from St. Joseph's University in Philadelphia in 1958. In his first years at IBM Research he focused on research in solid state physics and electronic devices, and as a result of achievements in these areas was named a fellow of both the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers (IEEE) and the American Physical Society. In the 1970-1971 academic year he was a visiting professor of physics at the Danish Technical University. Returning to IBM, he served in a number of management positions in research, development, and manufacturing before returning to head the Research Division in 1989. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering; chairman of the board of trustees at Phelps Memorial Hospital Center in Sleepy Hollow, New York; and a trustee of the HealthStar Hospital Network, of the Guglielmo Marconi Foundation,

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--> and of St. Joseph's University. He also serves on the board of directors of the Paxar Corporation. Charles Herzfeld, Vice Chair, currently serves as a consultant to a variety of organizations, such as the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, Los Alamos National Laboratory, and others. He holds an engineering degree from the Catholic University of America (B.S., 1945) and a Ph.D. from the University of Chicago (1951). He worked as a physicist at the Ballistic Research Laboratory, Aberdeen, Maryland, from 1951 to 1953, and at the Naval Research Laboratory in Washington, D.C., from 1953 to 1955. After several years with the National Bureau of Standards, he became assistant director of the Advanced Research Projects Agency of the Department of Defense. He was director of the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency from 1965 to 1967 and was instrumental in setting up the ARPANET. During his several years of affiliation with ITT, Dr. Herzfeld served as technical director and director of research groups and finally as vice president, director of research (1979-1983) and director of research and technology (1983-1985). He served as director of Defense Research and Engineering at the Department of Defense (1990-1991) and was a consultant to the Office of Science and Technology Policy, Executive Office of the President, in 1991. Dr. Herzfeld received the Flemming award in 1963 and was awarded the Meritorious Civilian Service medal by the Department of Defense in 1967. He has contributed numerous articles to professional journals. Norman Abramson is vice president and chief technical officer of ALOHA Networks, a San Francisco company providing satellite access to the Internet using small Earth stations. He joined the Stanford faculty in 1958 as assistant and then associate professor of electrical engineering. In 1965 he was appointed professor of electrical engineering at the University of Hawaii. He also served as professor and chairman of the Computer Science Department at the University of Hawaii. In 1967 he assumed the position of director of the ALOHA System, a university research project concerned with new forms of data network architecture. From 1972 to 1985 he served as a United Nations adviser to developing countries on the use of satellite technology for national development. In 1995 he left the University of Hawaii to found ALOHA Networks Inc. in order to develop advanced forms of ALOHA channels in the commercial sector. In addition to his fundamental research in multiple access communications, Mr. Abramson directed the creation of the ALOHANET, a wireless packet network operating throughout Hawaii. Edward Balkovich is a director at Bell Atlantic. He is responsible for IP and data network system engineering in Bell Atlantic's Network Archi-

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--> tecture organization. He also contributes to the technology adoption strategy and network evolution plan. Most recently, he led the introduction of voice over IP services in Bell Atlantic's core network. Dr. Balkovich's areas of expertise include computer-based systems and networks. Before coming to Bell Atlantic, Dr. Balkovich was senior consulting engineer with Digital Equipment Corporation. At Digital, he was responsible for a variety of research, architecture, and integration activities, and was a technical partner to major corporate accounts. While at Digital he co-led Project Athena at Massachusetts Institute of Technology and contributed to the architecture of the VAX cluster product line and the demonstration of encryption, tunneling, and firewalls as the basis for secure use of the Internet. Dr. Balkovich has also held a number of academic appointments, including adjunct associate professor at Brandeis University, visiting scientist at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and assistant professor at the University of Connecticut. Dr. Balkovich received his B.A. in mathematics from the University of California at Berkeley, and his M.S. and Ph.D. in electrical engineering and computer science from the University of California at Santa Barbara. He is a member of IEEE and the Association for Computing Machinery. Jordan Baruch received a B.S. and an M.S. in electrical engineering (1948) and an Sc.D. in electrical instrumentation (1950) from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and served as an assistant professor and lecturer in electrical engineering until 1970. Dr. Baruch has been president of Jordan Baruch Associates in Washington, D.C., since 1981. He is a consultant to industry and government on the planning, management, and integration of strategy and technology. Previously he was general manager, Medinet Department, General Electric Co. (1966-1968); president, Educom (1968-1970); independent consultant (1970-1971); lecturer in business administration, Harvard University (1971-1974); professor, Tuck School of Business and Thayer School of Engineering, Dartmouth College (1974-1977); and assistant secretary for science and technology, U.S. Department of Commerce (1977-1981). Dr. Baruch is a member of the National Academy of Engineering, the IEEE, and the American Association for the Advancement of Science. His research interests include computers in communication, acoustics, and technology management. Richard J. Baseil is vice president in Telcordia Technologies' Professional Services organization. Mr. Baseil has managed product testing and quality analyses of telecommunications switching, signaling, transport, and customer-premise systems, with an emphasis on hardware and software interoperability. He also advises telecommunications service providers on improvements to their procurement processes for network systems.

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--> Baseil played a major role in defining the industry need for, and subsequently establishing, a multi-company internetwork interoperability test planning effort in the United States, and he managed the Bellcore staff and the interconnection facility used by industry participants to conduct nationwide signaling and interoperability testing. Mr. Baseil has 24 years of telecommunications experience, having had responsibility for switching systems engineering, signaling network engineering, operations systems engineering, operating services system requirements, network database requirements, ISDN data services engineering, billing services, and some early descriptive work on next-generation switching systems. Mr. Baseil holds bachelor's and master's degrees in electrical engineering from the New Jersey Institute of Technology. Thomas A. Berson is founder and president of Anagram Laboratories, a company that specializes in computer security and cryptography. Dr. Berson has deep knowledge of cryptosystem architecture, cryptographic algorithms and protocols, network security issues, tiger team analyses, and strategies for information conflict. His consulting practice is focused on market-leading multinationals and U.S. government agencies. He earned a Ph.D. in computer science from the University of London and a B.S. in physics from the State University of New York. He has been a visiting fellow in mathematics at the University of Cambridge and is a member of the Stanford University Cryptography Seminar. He is an editor of the Journal of Cryptology. He is past-president of the International Association for Cryptologic Research and is the incoming chair of the IEEE Technical Committee on Security and Privacy. Toward the end of this study, Dr. Berson was appointed principal scientist at the Xerox Palo Alto Research Center. Richard Kemmerer is professor and past chair in the Computer Science Department at the University of California at Santa Barbara. He is a nationally known consultant in computer security and formal verification. He has written widely on the subjects of computer security, formal specification and verification, software testing, programming languages, and software complexity measures. Dr. Kemmerer received a Ph.D. (1979) in computer science from the University of California at Los Angeles. He is a fellow of the IEEE Computer Society and of the Association for Computing Machinery and past chair of the IEEE Technical Committee on Security and Privacy. He also served on the National Bureau of Standards' Computer and Telecommunications Security Council and on the National Research Council's study committees that produced Computers at Risk and For the Record.

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--> Butler Lampson is an engineer with the Microsoft Corporation. He was previously a corporate consulting engineer for Systems Research Center, Digital Equipment Corporation. Dr. Lampson has several publications and patents to his credit. He is a member of the Association for Computing Machinery, International Federation for Information Processing Working Group 2.3 on Programming Methodology, and the National Academy of Engineering. He received his Ph.D. (1967) in electrical engineering and computer science from the University of California and his AB magna cum laude (1964) with highest honors in physics from Harvard University. David M. Maddox retired from the U.S. Army in 1995 after serving as Commander in Chief, U.S. Army in Europe. Since that time, he has performed extensive consulting services regarding concepts, systems requirements, analytic techniques and analyses, operations and systems effectiveness, and program capture strategies to civilian corporations, government agencies, and defense industries. General Maddox has had extensive command experience. He served four tours in Germany during which he commanded at every level from the platoon through the Army group and theater. After commanding at the platoon and troop level in the 14th Armored Cavalry Regiment, he later commanded the 1st Squadron, 11th Armored Cavalry Regiment in Fulda, the 2nd Armored Cavalry Regiment (he was the 61st Colonel of the Regiment) in Nuremberg, the 18th Infantry Division (mechanized) in Bad Kreuznach, V Corps in Frankfurt, and NATO's Central Army Group and U.S. Army, Europe and 7th Army in Heidelberg. In addition, he has significant background in operations research. Paul D. Miller is chairman and CEO of Alliant Techsystems. Admiral Miller has had extensive command experience. He retired in November 1994 as Commander in Chief of the U.S. Atlantic Fleet (CINCLANT) and Supreme Allied Commander (Atlantic) for NATO. As CINCLANT, he oversaw the execution of Operation Uphold Democracy in Haiti. In his active service, he was a strong advocate for joint and combined operations. He developed a reputation as an innovator in the use of new technologies to support military operations. Among other notable accomplishments, he led the reorganization of the U.S. Atlantic Command, the first command that integrated all combatant forces in the continental United States. Carl G. O'Berry retired from the U.S. Air Force as a Lieutenant General in August 1995. Until December 1998 he was vice president and director of planning and information technology for the Space and Systems Technol-

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--> ogy Group at Motorola, where he was responsible for Group-wide strategic and long-range planning and executive management of group information technology solutions and services. In addition, he was responsible for information technology architectures and roadmaps, new information technology business development, and leadership of information technology innovation and process reengineering. He was previously Deputy Chief of Staff for Command, Control, Communications & Computers, Headquarters, United States Air Force, a position from which he directed Air Force-wide information systems planning and policy development. Earlier in his Air Force career, he served as Commander of the Air Force Rome Air Development Center and as Joint Program Manager, World-Wide Military Command and Control System Information System. He also led the development and field testing of an airborne radar sensing/tracking system that was the forerunner of the Joint Surveillance and Target Attack Radar System. He has a master of science degree in systems management from the Air Force Institute of Technology and a bachelor of science degree in electrical engineering from New Mexico State University. John H. Quilty is senior vice president and general manager, Washington C3 Center of the MITRE Corporation's C3I Federally Funded Research and Development Center. The Washington C3 Center supports the Army, Navy, Defense Information Systems Agency, Office of the Secretary of Defense, Office of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, and other members of the national security community. Mr. Quilty's current activities are focused on support of DOD initiatives and activities designed to achieve improved C4I support to joint operations. Previously, he assisted the general manager as vice president, Washington C3I Division, from 1986 to 1990. He is a member of the executive committee of the Armed Forces Communications and Electronics Association (AFCEA) board of directors and serves on the board of the annual NATO workshop addressing alliance issues following the end of the Cold War. He also serves as the Chair of the Military Communications Conference Board (IEEE/Armed Forces Communications and Electronics Association-sponsored). Mr. Quilty received a master of science degree in electrical engineering from Stanford University in 1962 and a bachelor of science degree in the same discipline from Princeton University in 1961. Robert H. Reed is a director of the Lear Astronics Corporation, a company that produces flight control computers and associated software and develops unique applications of radar and other sensor technology. Previously, he was the executive director of the National Training Systems Association, a trade association of companies producing computer-based

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--> training systems, programs, and products. General Reed served with the U.S. Air Force during the period from 1953 through July 1988. His last military assignment was to SHAPE (NATO), Mons, Belgium, where he served as Chief of Staff. He held the rating of Command Pilot with more than 6700 flying hours, including 339 hours of combat flying. He obtained a B.A. in political science from Syracuse University and a graduate degree in public administration from George Washington University. H. Gregory Tornatore is the program area manager for Defense Communications Programs at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (JHU/APL). His areas of expertise include military command, control and communications (C3), wide-area surveillance, over-the-horizon sensors and targeting, communications networks and architectures, high-frequency radar, and ionospheric propagation. His current responsibilities include overall management of a diverse set of programs sponsored by Army, Navy, Air Force, and selected DOD agencies that address operational and technical issues associated with National Command Authority connectivity to U.S. strategic forces; DOD satellite communications architecture development, control, and network management; tactical C3 systems vulnerability assessment; anti-jam and low-probability-of-intercept tactical radio systems; advanced phased-array antenna systems; and intelligence and information operations. Mr. Tornatore also chairs the Applied Physics Laboratory's Internal Research and Development Command and Control Thrust Area, responsible for the application of new technology to DOD C3 problems. Mr. Tornatore has been employed by JHU/APL since 1977 and has been a member of the Principal Professional Staff since 1980. Prior to joining JHU/APL, Mr. Tornatore was employed at the Electro-Physics Laboratory, ITT Avionics Division. Mr. Tornatore received a master of science degree in physics from the Pennsylvania State University in 1964 and a bachelor of science degree in physics from St. Francis College in 1961.