A Biographies of Committee Members

Jack E. Cermak (NAE) chair, is University Distinguished Professor, Fluid Mechanics and Wind Engineering, Engineering Research Center, Colorado State University. Dr. Cermak specializes in teaching and research related to environmental science, aerodynamics, engineering mechanics, meteorology, and fluid mechanics. He is the recipient of many awards and honors including: North Atlantic Treaty Organization Post-doctoral Fellow at Cambridge University; Aeronautics and Astronautics Award for Distinguished Leadership in Aerospace Engineering, American Institute for Aeronautics and Astronautics; American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Freeman Scholar; Sigma Xi National Lecturer; lecturer for Southwest Mechanics Lecture Series; member of Colorado's Governor's Science and Technology Advisory Council; ASME National Distinguished Lecturer; Senior Research Award, American Society of Engineering Education; honorary member, American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE); and national honor member, Chi Epsilon, the National Civil Engineering Honor Society. He has authored or co-authored more than 650 papers and reports and is editor or reviewer for a number of publications, including Mechanics Research Communications and the Journal of Wind Engineering and Industrial Aerodynamics. He founded the Fluid Mechanics and Wind Engineering Program at Colorado State University, as well as the Fluid Mechanics and Diffusion Laboratory, which was awarded the Outstanding Engineering Achievement Award from the National Society of Professional Engineers. Dr. Cermak was elected to membership in the National Academy of Engineering in recognition of his pioneering development of boundary-layer wind tunnels and served on the National Research Council Committee on Natural Disasters. He earned B.S. and M.S. degrees in civil engineering from Colorado State University and a Ph.D. in engineering mechanics from Cornell University.

Alan Davenport (NAE) is a professor of civil engineering at the University of Western Ontario. His research interests include aerodynamics, meteorology, environmental loads, structural dynamics, and earthquake loading. Dr. Davenport has pioneered the application of boundary-layer wind tunnels to the design of wind-sensitive structures, the description of urban wind climates, and other problems involving the action of wind. He was the founder of the Boundary Layer Wind Tunnel Laboratory and has been the director since it was established. Dr. Davenport has authored more than 200 papers and has lectured around the world. He has received numerous honors and awards including: Alfred Noble Prize; Gzowski Medal and Duggan Medal and Prize, Engineering Institute of Canada; Golden Plate Award, American Academy of Achievement; International Award of Merit in Structural Engineering, International Association of Bridge and Structural Engineering; Hellmuth Prize, University of Western Ontario; and the Canada Gold Medal for Science and Engineering. He has also received nine honorary degrees. He was elected to the Royal Society of Canada, the Fellowship of Engineering in England, and is a founding



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A Biographies of Committee Members Jack E. Cermak (NAE) chair, is University Distinguished Professor, Fluid Mechanics and Wind Engineering, Engineering Research Center, Colorado State University. Dr. Cermak specializes in teaching and research related to environmental science, aerodynamics, engineering mechanics, meteorology, and fluid mechanics. He is the recipient of many awards and honors including: North Atlantic Treaty Organization Post-doctoral Fellow at Cambridge University; Aeronautics and Astronautics Award for Distinguished Leadership in Aerospace Engineering, American Institute for Aeronautics and Astronautics; American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Freeman Scholar; Sigma Xi National Lecturer; lecturer for Southwest Mechanics Lecture Series; member of Colorado's Governor's Science and Technology Advisory Council; ASME National Distinguished Lecturer; Senior Research Award, American Society of Engineering Education; honorary member, American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE); and national honor member, Chi Epsilon, the National Civil Engineering Honor Society. He has authored or co-authored more than 650 papers and reports and is editor or reviewer for a number of publications, including Mechanics Research Communications and the Journal of Wind Engineering and Industrial Aerodynamics. He founded the Fluid Mechanics and Wind Engineering Program at Colorado State University, as well as the Fluid Mechanics and Diffusion Laboratory, which was awarded the Outstanding Engineering Achievement Award from the National Society of Professional Engineers. Dr. Cermak was elected to membership in the National Academy of Engineering in recognition of his pioneering development of boundary-layer wind tunnels and served on the National Research Council Committee on Natural Disasters. He earned B.S. and M.S. degrees in civil engineering from Colorado State University and a Ph.D. in engineering mechanics from Cornell University. Alan Davenport (NAE) is a professor of civil engineering at the University of Western Ontario. His research interests include aerodynamics, meteorology, environmental loads, structural dynamics, and earthquake loading. Dr. Davenport has pioneered the application of boundary-layer wind tunnels to the design of wind-sensitive structures, the description of urban wind climates, and other problems involving the action of wind. He was the founder of the Boundary Layer Wind Tunnel Laboratory and has been the director since it was established. Dr. Davenport has authored more than 200 papers and has lectured around the world. He has received numerous honors and awards including: Alfred Noble Prize; Gzowski Medal and Duggan Medal and Prize, Engineering Institute of Canada; Golden Plate Award, American Academy of Achievement; International Award of Merit in Structural Engineering, International Association of Bridge and Structural Engineering; Hellmuth Prize, University of Western Ontario; and the Canada Gold Medal for Science and Engineering. He has also received nine honorary degrees. He was elected to the Royal Society of Canada, the Fellowship of Engineering in England, and is a founding

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member and past president of the Canadian Academy of Engineering. He has been a consultant on the design of the World Trade Center, the Sears Building, and the Ting Kau Bridge in Hong Kong. Dr. Davenport received his B.A. and M.A. in mechanical sciences from Cambridge University, his M.A.Sc. in civil engineering from the University of Toronto, and his Ph.D. in civil engineering from the University of Bristol. Michael P. Gaus is research professor of civil engineering at the State University of New York at Buffalo. Dr. Gaus specializes in teaching and research in the areas of earthquake, wind, and natural hazard engineering; dynamic response of structures to wind; the performance of civil engineering materials; and computer methods in structural analysis and design. He is the current president of the American Association for Wind Engineering. Dr. Gaus is the recipient of several awards and honors including: the Meritorious Service Medal, National Science Foundation; Award for Outstanding Contributions to Engineering, School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, George Washington University; Award for Outstanding Contributions to Wind Engineering, Wind Engineering Research Council. He has served on a number of committees at the ASCE, the National Academy of Engineering, the ASME, and the Earthquake Engineering Research Institute. Dr. Gaus has held positions at a number of universities, consulting firms, and the National Science Foundation, where he worked on the development of research activities in natural hazard engineering, including wind, flood, large-scale earth movements, drought, and expanding and shrinking soil hazards. Dr. Gaus received his B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. in civil engineering and theoretical and applied mechanics from the University of Illinois at Champaign-Urbana. Stephen R. Hoover is a senior fire protection consultant with Kemper/NATLSCO, a Kemper Insurance-owned consulting firm. Mr. Hoover was a field engineer, account engineer, engineering supervisor, and staff engineer for the American Protection Insurance Company (a Kemper Company) before becoming a part of Kemper/NATLSCO. He has been involved with a number of committees including: Built-up Roofing Committee, American Society for Testing Materials; Uplift Testing Committee, ASTM; Committee for the Study of Hail Damage to Shingles, Insurance Institute for Property Loss Reduction; Rubber Tire Storage (chair), National Fire Protection Association (NFPA); Automatic Sprinkler (secretary), NFPA; and Inspection, Testing, Maintenance of Water Based Systems, NFPA. Mr. Hoover has attended several seminars on roofing technology at the University of Wisconsin and a wind engineering seminar at Texas Tech University. He has written several articles on roofing technology for REPORT, Plant Engineering, and Construction Specifier magazines. Mr. Hoover has taught roofing technology in Kemper education classes to both Kemper engineers and clients for 20 years. He has written all of the roofing, windstorm, snow load, and ponding portions of the NATLSCO Technical Reference Manual. Mr. Hoover received his B.S. in civil engineering from Indiana Institute of Technology. Nicholas P. Jones is professor of civil engineering at the Johns Hopkins University. His research and teaching focuses on structural dynamics, system identification, flow-induced vibration, and wind and earthquake engineering. He co-founded an experimental research program on aeroelasticity and aerodynamics of civil engineering structures using the Corrsin wind tunnel at Johns Hopkins University (JHU). Dr. Jones has received numerous honors and awards including: George Owen Teaching Award, JHU; 1998 Maryland Young Engineer of the

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Year, Maryland Engineers Week Council; National Science Foundation Presidential Young Investigator Award; Robert Pond Teaching Award, JHU; Huber Research Prize, ASCE; invited keynote speaker at the symposium in Kobe, Japan, inaugurating the opening of the Akashi-Kaikyo Bridge and at the International Symposium, ''Advances in Bridge Aerodynamics, Ship Collision Analysis, and Operation and Maintenance," commemorating the opening of the East Belt Bridge in Denmark. He is incoming editor for the Journal of Wind Engineering and Industrial Aerodynamics, on the board of directors of the American Association for Wind Engineering, and recently chaired the 8th U.S. National Conference on Wind Engineering. Dr. Jones received his B.E. from University of Auckland, New Zealand, and his M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in civil engineering from the California Institute of Technology. Ahsan Kareem is professor of civil engineering and geological sciences at the University of Notre Dame. Dr. Kareem specializes in research and teaching in probabilistic structural dynamics, fluid-structure interactions, and design of structures to resist natural hazards, including wind, waves, and earthquakes. Dr. Kareem is the recipient of numerous honors and awards including: 1998 Achievement in Academia Award, College of Engineering, Colorado State University; 1997 Engineering Award, National Hurricane Conference for Contributions to the Development of ASCE 7–95; Presidential Young Investigator Award, The White House Office of Science and Technology Policy/National Science Foundation; Halliburton Young Faculty Research Excellence Award, University of Houston; Martin Minta Award, American Institute for Aeronautics and Astronautics. He has also been the chairman of several committees including: Committee on Wind Effects/STD-Dynamics Effects, ASCE; Task Committee on Damping System/Wind Effects/STD-Dynamic Effects, ASCE; and Probabilistic Methods Committee, Engineering Mechanics Division, ASCE. He was a member of the National Research Council (NRC) Panel for Wind Division, ASCE Panel for Assessment of Wind Engineering Issues in the United States, and NRC Committee on Natural Disasters. Dr. Kareem served as a member of the board of directors on the Wind Engineering Research Council and is the immediate past president of the American Association for Wind Engineering. He is editor-in-chief, North and South American Wind and Structures; and associate editor of the Journal of Engineering Mechanics, ASCE. In addition, Dr. Kareem is a member of the following publications: Probabilistic Engineering Mechanics; Journal of Wind Engineering and Industrial Aerodynamics; Structural Safety, Engineering Structures, and Applied Ocean Research. He has served as a consultant to the United Nations Development Program and as a senior consultant to the oil, design, and insurance industries. He received his B.S. in civil engineering from West Pakistan University of Engineering and Technology, his M.S. in civil engineering from the University of Hawaii, and his Ph.D. in civil engineering from Colorado State University. Richard Kristie is a consultant with Wiss, Janney, Elstner Associates in Northbrook, Illinois. Mr. Kristie is a licensed structural engineer and a licensed professional engineer in Illinois. He has worked on a number of large structural design and analysis projects and on the development of structural analysis software. He has specialized in investigations involving a variety of structure types and component systems including: wood structures, wood truss roof systems, steel structures with corrosion problems, fire damaged structures, and plaza waterproofing systems. Mr. Kristie performed investigations of more than 60 residential structures in south Florida that were damaged during Hurricane Andrew. Mr. Kristie co-authored a paper on plate-connected wood trusses presented at an international conference on timber engineering and was

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lead author of a paper on wood bowstring trusses published in the ASCE Practice Periodical on Structural Design and Construction. Mr. Kristie received his B.S. in civil engineering from the University of Illinois, Champaign-Urbana. William F. Marcuson, III, (NAE) is the director of the Geotechnical Laboratory at Waterways Experiment Station of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. His areas of research expertise include dams, earthquake engineering, geotechnical engineering, and soil and rock mechanics and testing. He has been a member of several NRC committees, including the Advisory Panel for a National Earthquake Engineering Experimental Facility Study and the Workshop on Liquefaction. He is a member of many professional organizations including: American Society of Civil Engineers; International Society of Soil Mechanics and Foundation Engineering; American Society of Testing and Materials; Society of American Military Engineers; and the Earthquake Engineering Research Institute. In addition, Dr. Marcuson is a fellow of the Institution of Civil Engineers, a chartered engineer in England, and a licensed professional engineer in South Carolina and Mississippi. Dr. Marcuson received his B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. in civil engineering from the Citadel, Michigan State University, and North Carolina State University, respectively. Joseph E. Minor is research professor at the University of Missouri-Rolla and a private consulting engineer. Dr. Minor is recognized internationally in the fields of wind engineering, window glass design practice, and natural hazards research. Special areas of expertise include wind-structure interaction phenomena, effects of tornadoes and hurricanes on buildings, performance of window glass and curtain wall systems, building code provisions for wind effects, the economics of wind-resistant construction, and the impact of natural hazards on socio-economic systems. Dr. Minor is active on building code committees, industrial advisory boards, and professional society committees and as a consultant to government agencies, trade associations, and private organizations. He has lectured nationally and internationally on topics related to the integration of wind engineering research into professional practice and participates regularly in short courses and seminars related to the practice of wind engineering and window glass design practice. Dr. Minor is a member of many professional organizations including: ASCE, National Society of Professional Engineers, American Meteorological Society, and the Southern Building Code Congress International. Dr. Minor received his B.S. and M.S. degrees in civil engineering from Texas A&M University and his Ph.D. in civil engineering from Texas Tech University. He is a licensed professional engineer in Texas, Missouri, and Florida. Joseph Penzien (NAE) is the chairman of International Civil Engineering Consultants and professor emeritus at the University of California at Berkeley. His expertise is in the fields of structural dynamics, structures, earthquake engineering, engineering mechanics, and offshore structures. He has been the recipient of numerous awards and honors including: North Atlantic Treaty Organization Senior Science Fellowship; Research Prize, ASCE; National Science Foundation Senior Science Fellowship; Silver Medal of Paris; Elected Fellow, American Academy of Mechanics; Nathan M. Newmark Medal, ASCE; Alfred M. Freudenthal Medal, ASCE; George W. Housner Medal, Earthquake Engineering Research Institute (EERI); Elected Honorary Member, EERI; The Berkeley Citation; Elected Honorary Member, ASCE. He has served on several NRC committees, including the Advisory Committee for the International Decade for Natural Disaster Reduction and the Advisory Panel for a National Earthquake

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Engineering Experimental Facility Study. He has been a consultant to the United Nations Educational and Scientific Cultural Organization, State of California Attorney General's Office, and numerous engineering companies, research facilities, and government agencies worldwide. Dr. Penzien received his B.S. in civil engineering from the University of Washington and his Sc.D. from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Mark D. Powell is a research meteorologist for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) Hurricane Research Division (HRD), located at the Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory in Miami, Florida. At HRD, he has been active in microscale and mesoscale studies, concentrating on boundary-layer wind-structure in landfalling hurricanes and hurricane rain-band thermodynamics. Recently he has been active in the development of standards for the measurement of surface winds. He is currently leading a project on real-time surface wind analysis for eventual transfer to the National Hurricane Center as a forecasting tool for hurricane specialists. Dr. Powell has served as lead project scientist on NOAA P3 hurricane research flights, the Genesis of Atlantic Lows Experiment, and the Tropical Experiment in Mexico. He holds a certified consulting meteorologist designation from the American Meteorological Society. He has served on several committees including: Research Committee of the Interdepartmental Hurricane Conference, NRC Disaster Study Team on Hurricane Hugo's Landfall in the Mainland United States, Meteorology Subcommittee of the ASCE Task Committee on Wind Damage Investigation, and the U.S.-Japan Natural Disaster Task Committee on Wind-Hazards. He has served on the board of the American Association for Wind Engineering and is a member of the American Meteorological Society and the American Geophysical Union. He has published articles in several journals, including Journal of Geophysical Research, Monthly Weather Review, Weather and Forecasting, Wind Engineering and Industrial Aerodynamics, Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society, and Shore and Beach. Dr. Powell received his B.S. from the Florida State University, his M.S. from Pennsylvania State University, and his Ph.D. from Florida State University. Timothy A. Reinhold is associate professor of civil engineering at Clemson University. Dr. Reinhold's areas of research and teaching interest include: wind effects on structures; structural dynamics; reliability engineering; scale modeling studies; fluid-structure interaction; structural analysis; and failure investigations. He is currently involved in wind-load studies for low-rise and specialty structures, including the resistance of structures to wind effects. Dr. Reinhold's research has included projects to: improve the simulation of wind loads on low-rise structures, investigate wind loads for coastal structures, investigate retrofitting for existing structures subjected to high winds, and investigate the feasibility of a full-scale wind test facility. Dr. Reinhold serves on the Wind Effects Committee, ASCE, the Southern Building Code Congress International, and the ASCE-7 Standard Wind Loads Subcommittee. Dr. Reinhold received his B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. degrees in engineering mechanics from Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University. Eleonora Sabadell is the director of the Natural and Technological Hazards Mitigation Program at the National Science Foundation. This program, in the Division of Civil and Mechanical Systems, supports research on the consequences of weather-related hazards on the built and natural environments. She has served on the NRC Panel on Water Resources Planning. Dr. Sabadell has represented the U.S. government in many international, bilateral, and United

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Nations programs and conferences. She has worked with public and private organizations in Japan, India, Brazil, Mexico, Taiwan, Pakistan, People's Republic of China, Spain, Italy, and other countries. At the present time, she is a member of the Subcommittee on Natural Disaster Reduction of the National Science and Technology Council. Dr. Sabadell is the author and editor of articles, reports, and proceedings and a member of editorial boards and several professional associations. She received her degrees in chemical engineering from the National University of Buenos Aires, Argentina. Emil Simiu is a National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) fellow and a research professor at the Johns Hopkins University. Dr. Simiu has conducted research at NIST's Building and Fire Research Laboratory on: dynamic loads induced on structures by wind, ocean waves, and earthquakes; structural dynamics; structural reliability; and chaotic and fluid-elastic responses. He is the co-author, with R.H. Scanlan, of "Wind Effects on Structures" (3rd ed., Wiley, 1996). Dr. Simiu has been a consultant to industry, government, and the World Bank. He is a past chairman of the ASCE Committees on Wind Effects, Dynamic Effects, and the Reliability of Offshore Structures and recipient of the Federal Engineer of the Year Award from the National Society of Professional Engineers and the Gold Medal, U.S. Department of Commerce. Dr. Simiu received his first degree from the Institute of Civil Engineering, Bucharest, his M.S. in applied mechanics from Brooklyn Polytechnic Institute, and his Ph.D. from Princeton University.