PLATE 1 View of a modern automobile showing the location of various types of materials in the structure of the body and components. (Reprinted, by permission, from General Motors Research Laboratories, 1989.)

PLATE 2 Plasma immersion implantation chamber for surface modification. (Courtesy TRW, Inc. Copyright © 1986 by TRW, Inc.)



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OCR for page 295
Materials Science and Engineering for the 1990s: Maintaining Competitiveness in the Age of Materials PLATE 1 View of a modern automobile showing the location of various types of materials in the structure of the body and components. (Reprinted, by permission, from General Motors Research Laboratories, 1989.) PLATE 2 Plasma immersion implantation chamber for surface modification. (Courtesy TRW, Inc. Copyright © 1986 by TRW, Inc.)

OCR for page 295
Materials Science and Engineering for the 1990s: Maintaining Competitiveness in the Age of Materials PLATE 3 Centrifugal atomization, one of several techniques for creating samples of rapidly solidified metal. (Reprinted, by permission, from Bernard H.Kear, 1986, Advanced Metals, Sci. Am. 255:159–167. Copyright © 1986 by Pratt & Whitney Aircraft.) PLATE 4 Scherk’s first minimal surface shown in (a) is a model of the boundary between two polymers in a copolymer. An electron microscope image of an actual copolymer (polystyrene-polybutadiene) shown in (b) matches a projection (c) of Scherk’s surface. (Reprinted, by permission, from Edwin L.Thomas, David M. Anderson, Chris S.Henkee, and David Hoffman, 1988, Periodic Area-Minimizing Surfaces in Block Copolymers, Nature 334:598–601. Copyright © 1988 by Macmillan Magazines Ltd.)