TABLE 2.1 Industries Surveyed in This Study

Industry

Scope of Survey

Aerospace

Airframe and engine materials (not electronics)

Automotive

Primarily automobiles

Biomaterials

Primarily materials used in contact with human body tissue

Chemical

Traditional chemicals, polymers, advanced ceramics

Electronics

Materials for computers, commercial and consumer electronics

Energy

Electricity, coal, oil, natural gas, nuclear, solar, geothermal

Metals

Production and forming of primary metals

Telecommunications

Materials for telephone and data transfer equipment

national importance, so that materials science and engineering can be more fully exploited.

The eight industries collectively employed 7 million people and had sales of $1.4 trillion in 1987 (Table 2.2). In addition, they were critical to many millions of jobs and to huge sales in ancillary manufacturing industries, for example, in the manufacture of materials for electronic applications that drive the computer hardware industry.

TABLE 2.2 Economic Impact of the Eight Industries

Industry

1987 Employmenta (thousands)

1987 Sales ($ billion)

Aerospace

835

105.6

Automotive

963

222.7

Biomaterials

>50

Chemical

1004

195.2

Electronics

1394

155.4

Energy

1229

375.8

Metals

629

(1230)b

98.9

Telecommunications

1007

146.0

aThe statistics are taken from the U.S. Industrial Outlook 1989, published by the Department of Commerce, International Trade Administration, Washington, D.C.

bThe 1980 to 1985 average based on a broader definition of the metals and mining industry used in Employment Prospects for 1995, Bulletin 2197 published by the Bureau of Labor Statistics, Washington, D.C. (1984).



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