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Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff PAUL N. YLVISAKER is Charles William Eliot Professor of Education at the Graduate School of Education, Harvard University. He received his B.S. degree from Mankato State College ( 1942) and his M.P.A. ( 1945) and Ph.D. (1948) degrees in political economy and government from Harvard University. Ylvisaker began his teaching career at Bethany Col- lege and has taught at Harvard University, Swarthmore College, Princeton University, and Yale University. In addition, he has served in a variety of government positions and on advisory groups, including executive secretary to the mayor of Philadelphia, commissioner of the New Jersey Department of Community Affairs, and chairman of a presidential task force on cities. From 1955 to 1967 he was a member of the staff of the Ford Foundation, directing its public affairs program from 1959 to 1967. He serves on a number of corporate, foundation, community, and edu- cational boards. Ylvisaker's writing and research include works on urban affairs, planning, education, and philanthropy. BRIAN J. L. BERRY is dean of the School of Urban and Public Affairs, Carnegie-Mellon University. He received a B.S. degree (1955) from Uni- versity College, London, and his M.A. degree (1956) and Ph.D. degree (1958) in geography from the University of Washington. He also received an honorary A.M. degree from Harvard University in 1977. Berry was an instructor at the University of Washington before joining the geography faculty of the University of Chicago in 1958, where he became Irving B. Harris Professor of Urban Geography, director of the Center for Urban 198

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Biographical Sketches 199 Studies, and chair of the Department of Geography. In 1976 he was appointed Williams professor of city and regional planning at Harvard University, where he also served as chair of the Ph.D. program in urban planning, director of the Laboratory for Computer Graphics and Spatial Analysis, fellow of the Institute for International Development, and pro- fessor of sociology. A member of the National Academy of Sciences, Berry is the author of many books and articles on urban affairs. HARVEY BROOKS is Benjamin Pierce Professor of Technology and Public Policy at Harvard University. He holds an A.B. degree in mathematics from Yale University (1937) and a Ph.D. degree in physics from Harvard University ( 1940~. He was a Henry fellow of Cambridge University ( 1937- 1938) and has received honorary degrees from a number of universities. The positions he has held include assistant director, Advance Research Laboratory, The Pennsylvania State University, and professor of engi- neering research; lecturer, Salzburg Seminar in American Studies; Phi Beta Kappa Visiting Scholar; Gordon McKay Professor of Applied Phys- ics, Harvard University; and Guggenheim fellow. He has been a member of the faculty of government at Harvard since 1961. A member of the National Academy of Sciences, Brooks has served as chair of the Com- mission on Sociotechnical Systems. He has also served as chairman of the board of the German Marshall Fund of the United States, chairman of the American Physical Science Society panel on public affairs, and consultant to the Science and Technology Policy Office, National Science Foundation. KENNETH B. CLARK is the president of Clark, Phipps, Clark, and Harris of New York City. He received his A.B. degree from Howard University (1935) and his M.S. degree (1936) and Ph.D. degree (1940) in psychology from Columbia University. He joined the faculty of the City College of New York in 1942, where he taught social psychology, becoming professor emeritus in 1975. From 1967 to 1975 he was concurrently president of his consulting firm and president of Metropolitan Applied Research Cen- ter, Inc. Clark served as president of the American Psychological Asso- ciation in 1971. He has practiced and written extensively on child, social, and clinical psychology; race relations; education; and human relations. JOHN M. DEGROVE is director of the Joint Center for Environmental and Urban Problems at Florida Atlantic University. He also serves as chair of the department of political science and as provost of the Broward County campus of Florida Atlantic. He received his B.A. degree from Rollins College (1953), his M.A. degree from Emory University (1954), and his

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200 Rethinking Urban Policy Ph.D. degree in political science from the University of North Carolina (19581. From 1958 to 1964 he was a member of the political science faculty of the Unversity of Florida. He became professor of political science at Florida Atlantic University in 1964, also serving as dean of the College of Social Science from 1964 to 1978. DeGrove has been a member of the President's Commission on Urban Problems; the executive com- mittee of the Southern Growth Policies Board; the Florida Constitutional Revision Commission and chairman of its local government committee; chairman of the Panel on State Urban Policy, National Academy of Public Administration; special adviser to the governor of Florida; and special adviser to the White House Conference on Strategic Planning. He has written books and articles on urban problems, state government, region- alism, and the environment. JAMES M. Howell is senior vice-president and head of the economics department of the First National Bank of Boston. He holds a B.A. degree from Texas Agriculture and Mechanical College ~ 1956) and a Ph. D. degree in economics from Tulane University (19631. Howell has served as econ- omist for the Federal Reserve System; economic adviser to the Republic of Chile; and economist for the Office of the Secretary of Commerce. He joined the First National Bank in 1970. He was also professor of economics at the University of Maryland and has taught at The George Washington University. HARVEY S. PERLOFF was dean of the School of Architecture and Urban Planning at the University of California, Los Angeles, from 1968 until his death in 1983. He received a B.A. degree (1935) from the University of Pennsylania. After graduate study at the London School of Economics, he received a Ph.D. degree in economics from Harvard University (19401. From 1941 to 1943 he was an economist for the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System. He then served as consultant to the govern- ment of Puerto Rico; as associate professor and head of the Program of Education and Research in Planning at the University of Chicago; and as director of the Program of Urban and Regional Studies at Resources for the Future, Inc. From 1962 to 1964 Perloff was the U.S. member of the Committee of Nine of the Alliance for Progress. He was a consultant to many U.S., foreign, and international organizations and served as a mem- ber of a wide variety of committees concerned with urban and regional problems. Perloff was president of the American Planning Association. He was a member of the Commission on Sociotechnical Systems of the National Research Council, chair of the Advisory Committee for the United Nations program of Training and Research in Regional Planning and

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Biographical Sketches 201 Development, and a member of the Executive Committee, Western Center, American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Perloff wrote many books and articles on planning, urban problems, economics, and regional issues. GEORGE E. PETERSON is principal research associate and director of the public finance program of The Urban Institute. He holds a B.A. degree in history from Amherst College (1963~; B.A. and M.A. degrees in pol- itics, philosophy, and economics from Oxford University (1965), where he was a Rhodes scholar; and a Ph.D. degree in economics from Harvard University ~ 19731. He has been a member of the staff of The Urban Institute since 1972, directing studies of urban land development patterns, central- city housing markets, impacts of tax policy on urban development, urban capital investment and financing, economic and fiscal monitoring systems, and compensation programs. He has written books and articles on public finance. GAIL GARFIELD SCHWARTZ is president of Garfield Schwartz Associates, Inc., an economics consulting firm. She received her B.A. degree in political science from Smith College (1955), an M.A. degree in planning and public administration from New York University (1969), and a Ph.D. degree in urban and regional economics from Columbia University ~ 1972~. From 1971 to 1974 she was deputy director of the division of economic planning and development of the New York City Planning Department and became its director in 1974, serving until 1977 when she became a senior fellow of the Academy for Contemporary Problems, a position she held until 1981. During this period, she was also a senior research scientist at the Center for Metropolitan Planning and Research, visiting professor of planning at the University of North Carolina, and visiting professor of public policy at Johns Hopkins University. --I rig ROBERT C. WOOD is Henry R. Luce Professor of Democratic Institutions and Social Order at Wesleyan University. He received his B.A. degree from Princeton University (1946) and his M.P.A. (1947), M.A. (1948), and Ph.D. (1950) degrees in political economy and government from Harvard University. After serving from 1949 to 1951 as assistant director of the Florida Legislative Research Bureau, Wood joined the staff of the U.S. Bureau of the Budget, leaving in 1953 to join the government faculty at Harvard University, where he taught until 1957. From 1957 to 1966 he was a member of the faculty of political science at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), where he served as head of the political science department from 1965 to 1966. In 1966 he was appointed under-

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202 Rethinking Urban Policy secretary of the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development. In 1969 he directed the Joint Center for Urban*Studies, Harvard-MIT, before becoming president of the University of Massachusetts, holding that position until 1977 when he returned to the Joint Center as a senior associate. From 1978 to 1980 he was superintendent of the Boston public schools. During the year 1980-1981 he was visiting professor of political science at MIT and visiting professor of education at Harvard University. From 1981 to 1983 he was professor of political science at the University of Massachusetts, Harbor Campus. Wood has written many books and articles on urban government and policy and urban education. ROYCE HANSON was the study director of the Committee on National Urban Policy. He received his B.A. degree in economics from Central State University of Oklahoma ~ 19531. His M.A. degree ~ 1957) and Ph.D. degree ~ 1963) in government and public administration and his J. D. degree ~ 1983) are from The American University. Hanson was a member of the faculty of The American University's School of Government and Public Admin- istration from 1957 to 1972. From 1966 to 1971 he served as president of the Washington Center for Metropolitan Studies. In 1971-1972 he was director of the New Communities Study Center of Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University at Reston, Virginia. He was a visiting pro- fessor of urban affairs at the University of Maryland in 1971. From 1972 to 1981 he was chairman of the Montgomery County, Maryland, Planning Board of the Maryland-National Capital Park and Planning Commission. He is now associate director of the Hubert H. Humphrey Institute of Public Affairs at the University of Minnesota. He is the author of books and articles on urban affairs, planning, intergovernmental relations, and con- stitutional law. GORDON L. CLARK is associate professor of geography at the University of Chicago. During 1981- 1982 he was a National Research Council fellow working with the Committee on National Urban Policy. He received a B.Ec. degree (1973) and an M.A. degree (1975) in geography from Mon- ash University, Melbourne, Australia. In 1978 he received his Ph.D. degree in geography from McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario. From 1978 to 1983 he was an assistant professor at the John F. Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University. Clark held a Ford fellowship in urban studies in 1976-1978 and has received research grants from the National Science Foundation and the W. F. Milton Fund. He has written extensively on problems of labor markets, interregional migration, and the structure and functions of local governments.

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Biographical Sketches JOHN REES a National Research Council fellow for 1983, is associate professor of geography at the Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs, Syracuse University. He holds a B.A. degree (honors) from the University of Wales (1969), an M.A. degree from the University of Cin- cinnati (1971), and a Ph.D. degree from the London School of Economics (19771. From 1975 to 1983 he was on the faculty of the University of Texas at Dallas and from 1980 to 1982 served on the Economic Advisory Council of the North Texas Commission. Since 1977 Rees has received a number of research awards from the National Science Foundation and has conducted studies for government agencies, including the Joint Eco- nomic Committee of Congress, the Office of Technology Assessment, the General Accounting Office, and the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development. He has written articles on industrial location, tech- nological change, and regional development. 203

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