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ARTHUR M. BUECHE Novemberl4, 1920-October22, 1981 BY ROLAND SCHMITT AM E R ~ C A S R & D T R ~ A N G ~ E was Arthur Maynard Bucche's favorite way of describing the unique contri- butions of universities, industry, and government to the na- tion's total technological strength. The soundness of that tri- angle was the principal focus of his extraordinary career in science, engineering, management, and statesmanship on be- half of technology. Although he was employed in industry by a single com- pany for thirty years Art Bucche's energy and enthusiasm led him to devote large segments of his time and talents to academia and government, while continuing to direct the technical affairs of General Electric with a style that earned the acclaim of his associates. He recognized that he could not do his full job as a leacler of industrial technology without also fostering the strong roles of partners in the "triangle." For example, one of his major efforts during the year prior to his sullen death from a heart attack on October 22, 1981, was as key technical adviser to President-elect Reagan during the pre-inaugural transition perioc! of late 1980 and early 1981. His writings and reports of that perioc! include bal- ancecl and insightful comments on the respective roles of industrial, academic, and government technology, along with recommendations for improving the national economy, de 23

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24 BIOGRAPHICAL MEMOIRS fense, and the strength of the nation's educational system through cooperation and mutual respect. (Soon after his in- auguration, President Reagan offered Dr. Bucche the post of presidential science adviser. Newspaper accounts at the time said Dr. Bucche had reluctantly (leclinecl for personal rea- sons. Although he never discussed this matter with them, his closest friends believe he had personal premonitions about his health that made him fear he could not give the White House position the alI-out effort he felt it must have.) Arthur Maynard Bunches was born in Flushing, Michi- gan, on November 14, 1920. His father was an enterprising small-town businessman who put his son to work as a clerk in the family grocery store when he was eleven years oIcI, anct later as a milIhand and mechanic in the family farm-imple- ment business. During high school, young Art was very much involved in extracurricular activities, inclucling debating, stu- (lent government, track, football, plays, operettas, band, glee- club, anc! orchestra. Near the end of his senior year, several of his high school teachers counseled him to stucly law at the University of Michigan. "But," as he wrote later, "it didn't work out quite that way." Art's father wanted him to stay in Flushing and learn to run the family's flourishing businesses. His mother wanted him to go on to college, although she had misgivings about a career in law. Almost on a whim, based partly on the respect he hac! for his high school chemistry teacher but even more because of the ambition of a close frienc! and classmate, Art decidect he wanted to be a chemical engineer. He enrollee! at ~ Art preferred that the name be pronounced BEEK'-uh, although he was always remarkably tolerant of the countless variations he inevitably encountered. His as- sociates in chemistry suggested it was like "beaker," without the r, and a favorite in- house couplet made note of his role as GE's fourth research director: Like Archimedes, shout 'Eureka'- Whitney, Coolidge, Suits, and Bucche.

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ARTHUR M. BUECHE 25 Flint Junior College,2 riding a bus ten miles each day from Flushing, and ended up in a liberal arts course with a "major" in chemistry. Early on at Flint, an adviser told him he was better suited to the study of chemistry than of chemical en . . glneerlng. During his two years at the University of Michigan, where he received his B.S. in chemistry in 1943, Art began to rec- ognize that his interests and aptitudes leaned more toward research than to formal course work. This interest survived and grew, even though his first major research effort inves- tigating the possibility that radioactive suIphur might have been produced in a large quantity of sodium chloride that had been stored for some years near the University's cyclo- tron was, in his words, "a rather complete failure." After nine months at Ohio State, the opportunity came for graduate work at Cornell University, which had been his original first choice. "Besides," he wrote, "Cornell paid slightly more." In some sketchy autobiographical notes writ- ten many years later, Art said, "At Cornell ~ shopped around for a thesis adviser and found many fine possibilities. Unfor- tunately' the adviser ~ wanted most was Professor (Peter) De bye, but he was reluctant to take on any more students. I guess ~ forced my way on him." in January of 1946, soon after presenting his first paper (on thermal diffusion of polymer solutions) to the American Physical Society, Art was encouraged to forego his teaching duties "although ~ enjoyed them immensely" so that he could devote his full attention to research on synthetic rubber in a program directed by Professor Debye under contract 2 In later years, when asked to provide biographical information for the records of various organizations or for people who were to introduce him on speaking occasions, Dr. Bueche always asked that Flint Junior College be included along with the University of Michigan, Ohio State, and Cornell. He was a firm believer in the importance of education at all levels and was a great supporter of junior colleges.

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26 BIOGRAPHICAL MEMOIRS from the Office of Rubber Reserve. He later wrote: "The contribution that I macle which was perhaps the most pio- neering in nature was that involving the cl~etermination of the size of polymer molecules in solution. To the best of my knowlecige, this was the first time that this had been clone and I was encouraged by Professor Debye to use his light- scattering theories to accomplish this." (Debye had received his Nobel Prize in 1936 for studies of light-scattering phe- nomena.) The Debye-Bucche work on the size and shape of polymer molecules has been fundamental to further studies of solution behavior, chemical reactions, and viscosity. Bucche received his Ph.D. in physical chemistry from Cornell in 1947. The young Cornell research assistant was {urea to Sche- nectady, New York, and the General Electric Research Lab- oratory mainly on the strength of a canclicl at times almost confrontational interview with Dr. A. LincoIn Marshall. Marshall, who header! GE's chemistry research, was a crusty, driving, entrepreneurial leacler whose forceful nature had played a key part in getting General Electric started down the road of manufacturing polymer products for applications other than electrical insulation. He recognized that young Bucche had unusual intellectual capacity; he hoped there was also the kind of restless spirit so essential to the job of moving research results to practical application with minimum delay. Marshall's hopes, although he later acimittecT he had some reservations about them at first, were to be amply fulfilled. Thus Bucche joined GE "at the bench" in 1950. He not only adapted himself to the pace of industrial research but also was soon fully enmeshed in it. One of the acivancecI ideas in polymer science in the late 1940s involves] shooting a beam of high-energy electrons into a polymer and trying to get the electrons to cause desirable new connections crosslinks- between the individual long chains. Marshall, who had

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ARTHUR M. BUECHE worked on an early version of the iclea back in 1925, 27 initiated a project in 1951. It paired Bucche with a veteran physicist, Elliot Lawton. A million volt accelerator tract become available due to the Lab's earlier x-ray work. In 1952, Lawton and Bucche used it to crosslink polyethylene. GE's Chemical Products Department immediately became interested, and work got uncler way leading to another new product, Irrath- ene~, a high-performance plastic that was the first ever made by electron irradiation techniques. Making crosslinked poly- ethylene at all represented a substantial achievement. How- ever, making it by electron beam irradiation turned out to be too expensive for anything but specialty applications. But it catalyzer! a new insulation technology. The first half-clozen years in Schenectady, from 1950 until 1956, constituted Bucche's "research years." It was a time of wicle-ranging exploration into new fields of polymer chem- istry, of writing papers, and of producing patents at the rate of about two each year. Although he had first assumed a managerial title in 1953 (leacling a small research team then called Polymer and Interface Stuclies), it was not until the late 1950s that his growing responsibilities forced him to spend a majority of hits time in management. rather than at the bench. When Marshall retiree! in 1961, C. Guy Suits, GE's re- search director, recognized Bucche as the obvious choice to head the Chemistry Research Department, which by that time was cleeply involved in clevelopments that would lead to General Electric's remarkable success in the engineering plas- tics business. As manager of chemistry research, Bucche hacI clemonstratect incisiveness, ability to motivate others, in- creasec! unclerstancling of business problems and their rela- tionships to technological opportunities, and on a day-to- day basis funciamentally sound management skills. It was no great surprise, then, that Arthur M. Bucche was named

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28 BIOGRAPHICAL MEMOIRS to succeed Suits when the latter retired in 1965. Bucche was to continue the notable record of continuity among research directors at GE: Willis R. Whitney, the laboratory's founder, had served from 1900 to 1932; William D. Coolicige from ~ 932 to ~ 945; and Suits from ~ 946 to ~ 965. Bucche would extend this record so that the leadership of these four men would span seventy-eight years! Although it may not have been surprising that Bueche succeeded Suits, there were shock waves within the ranks of GE technology when, in announcing Bucche's new appoint- ment, the company also said it was combining the Research Laboratory with tile Advanced Technology Laboratories to create a new entity to be known as the General Electric Re- search and Development Center. Thus Art Bucche's new job brought with it a major challenge. The former Research Lab- oratory, an organization with a long tradition of emphasis on fundamental research, had always been supported almost completely by GE corporate funds, and it had often been cautioned in the past by company management not to per- form engineering or development work that might detract from its science-oriented mission. The former Acivanced Technology Laboratories, earlier callecI the General Engi- neering Laboratory, was an institution that had sufferer! a variety of ups and downs because of its broad dependence on contracts for support, a place where short-range results were the principal priority, and an organization sometimes looked on as a "poor cousin," occupying quarters in the Sche- nectacly Main Plant that were a far cry from the glamorous surroundings created for the Research Laboratory "out on the hill" at a site overlooking the Mohawk River in nearby Niskavuna. Art Bucche's assignment was to not onIv inte .. . 1. . . . . grate these two disparate organizations Into a cooperative, smoothly working whole, but also-of greatest importance- to "get them connected to the company" and in tune with

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ARTHUR M. BUECHE 29 General Electric's growing technological neects and objec tlves. On the night before Dr. Bucche died, he was honored in absentia by the Franklin Institute with its Delmer S. Fahrney Medal. The citation react on that occasion succinctly sum- marizec! how well the challenges of 1965 were met. It react, in part: From 1965 to 1978, under his leadership, this combined entity (the new General Electric Research and Development Center) achieved re- markable success, with the staff grown to more than 2000, including 800 scientists and engineers, and with laboratories in many domestic and over- seas locations. Dr. Bucche's leadership of these operations has been rec- ognized as an unusually outstanding example of managerial skill. He has been highly innovative in the development of effective approaches to both strategic and operational planning of technical work, in devising new tech- nical liaison and technical information exchange techniques, in promoting and recognizing technical excellence, and in encouraging an extremely diversified company to utilize its varied strengths in new organizational and operations approaches. Art Bucche himself once clefined his job this way: "Our funciamental task is to spot the kind of person who at least demonstrates the potential for being the one in a hundred one in a thousand one in a lifetime who may have the flash of true genius. Then our job, above all others, is to give these people, and their ideas, a chance to survive and grow." He would constantly ask his associates, "What's new? What's the new idea? Why can't we get this clone faster? What are the obstacles? Let's get moving." He pushed, cTirectecl, stretched, and challenged people to reach beyond what they tract thought they could accomplish. As one coworker toIct a news reporter preparing an article about Art Bucche, "It's tough to match his effort on the job, seven clays a week. He sets an example that's clifficult for people to follow. And this inspires them. He won't take no for an answer. Anc! he wants to unclerstanct everything."

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30 BIOGRAPHICAL MEMOIRS The achievements of the R&D Center under his lead- ership were many and noteworthy. In electronics, the ac- complishments included the development of an advanced computerized axial tomography (CAT) x-ray scanner; the de- velopment of the first solid-state imager based on charge- injection crevice technology; invention of thermomigration, a process that reducect the time requirec! for certain semicon- ductor processing steps; and the invention of the surface charge correlator, a new semiconductor crevice for analog sig- nal processing. Achievements in new materials technology included development of a commercial process for fabricat- ing cubic boron nitride, a man-macle material second in harcI- ness only to diamond; invention of polycrystalline diamond "compacts" for metal-cutting tools; the creation in the labo- ratory of the first synthesized gem diamoncis; the first simple and inexpensive technique for fabricating ceramic parts of silicon carbide; invention of silicon/silicon carbide compos- ites; and several high-performance plastics, including a fam- ily of resins based on a unique technology of polymerization by oxidative coupling. In the field of energy R&D, achieve- ments included advances in the development of water-cooled gas turbines, soclium-suIphur batteries, coal-gasification tech- nology, and the production of energy-efficient lamps. Dr. Bucche's achievements brought him a variety of mecl- als ant! honors, inclucling eight honorary doctorates. They also brought him promotion within General Electric, to the post of senior vice president for corporate technology in 1978. This meant he became the company's top technical of- ficer and spokesman and joined the corporate executive com- mittee but he also hac! to move from Schenectady to Fair- field, Connecticut. This required that he relinquish the direct clay-to-clay responsibility for the R&D Center, although the Center remained uncler his purview as a senior officer. From the time he first became a company officer in 1965,

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A RT H U R M . B U E C H E 31 Dr. Bucche recognizes! his role and responsibility as a public spokesman for technology. His platform appearances, before GE ant] outside audiences, averaged nearly one each week over a perioc! of fifteen years. He was in great clemancI as an interpreter of technology and, towarc! the end of his career, as a forthright spokesman on technology policy and the ap- propriate roles of universities, industry, and government in the "R&D triangle." He also spoke to many international au- cliences: in Japan, the South American nations, Mexico, Can- ada, France, Italy, Spain, and Germany. He served as Amer- ican chairman of the World Electrotechnical Congress in Moscow during 1977. Appearances in Great Britain included a Faraday Lecture at the Royal Institution (during which Man-made cliamoncis were actually proclucecl "on the spot") and the Kelvin Lecture for the Institute of Electrical Engi neers. As an active member of the National Academy of Sci- ences, he servect on the Academy Forum Advisory Commit- tee anc! the Finance Committee. He was a member of the National Academy of Engineering and of the Executive Committee of its Council. He served as president and a di- rector of the Industrial Research Institute. In government, he was active on several advisory groups to the presiclent's office on matters related to science and technology. He also servect as a member or consultant with science anc! technology committees of the National Science Foundation, NASA, the U.S. Air Force, the National Bureau of Standards, and the Energy Research and Development Administration. In education, he served on the Board of Trustees of the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, the Albany Medical College, and the Huclson-Mohawk Valley Association of Colleges anct Universities. He was a member of Visiting Committees at Massachusetts institute of Technology, Harvard, and Duke;

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32 BIOGRAPHICAL MEMOIRS of the Advisory Committee of the School of Metallurgy and Materials Science, as well as of the Board of Overseers, for the School of Engineering and Appliecl Science at the Uni- versity of Pennsylvania; and of the Advisory Boarc! of the Institute of Materials Sciences at the University of Connecti- cut. His contributions to, ant! associations with, his alma ma- ter, Cornell, were legion; among his assignments was chair- manship of the Council for the College of Engineering. While a resident of Schenectady (from 1950 to 1978), his public service incluclecI boarcI membership of Ellis Hospital and of Sunnyview Hospital and Rehabilitation Center. He also found considerable personal satisfaction in helping guide the affairs of one of the area's largest and most pro- gressive banking institutions, the Schenectady Savings Bank (now Northeast Savings), as an active boarct member. On Monday evening, October ~ 9, 198 I, Art Bucche server! as chairman of a dinner meeting at GE's Fairfield headquarters, held to honor eleven Steinmetz Award win- ners, people from various GE business components who had macle outstanding technical contributions during their ca- reers with the company. Early the next morning, he suffered a massive heart attack. In spite of superb medical attention, including some pioneering new techniques, he diect at St. Vincent's Hospital, Bridgeport, Connecticut, on October 22, 1981. His family3 and associates moved at once to establish a fitting memorial: the Arthur M. Bucche Memorial Fund, cur- rently administerect by the National Academy of Engineer- ing. Each year the NAE Awards Committee will select a re- cipient to be honored for "outstanding statesmanship in . 3 Dr. Bucche was survived by his four children: Kristine of Wilmington, North Carolina; A. John of Ellsworth, Maine; Margaret of Ballston Lake, New York; Eliz abeth of Schenectady, New York; one grandchild; and two brothers, Frederick I. of Flushing, Michigan, and Bernard M. of Flushing, New York.

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ARTHUR M. BUECHE 33 science anct technology." The recipients will be asked to pre- sent lectures on science and technology issues, and a cash gift will be made to the school where the lecture is presentecl. At the funeral service in St. John the Evangelist Church, Schenectady, on October 27th, one of Dr. Bucche's long-time associates saic! in his eulogy: Above all, Art Bucche was tough-minded. That was a quality he re- spected highly respected- in others. And we respected, admired, envied him for his tough-mindedness for the intellectual power for the con- centration for the genius' attention to detail for the searching ques- tions that made us all recognize, so often, how far ahead of us he was in his thinking for the willingness to devote energy, time, enthusiasm, and persistence to the task at hand, with a diligence and dedication the rest of us could only marvel at, hold in awe.

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34 BIOGRAPHICAL MEMOIRS BIBLIOGRAPHY 1947 With P. Debye. Microgel content and optical dissymmetry of GR-S solutions. Washington, D.C.: Office of Rubber Reserve. With P. Debye. Molecular weights and sizes of molecules by 90 scattering at different wave lengths. Washington, D.C.: Office of Rubber Reserve. 1948 Adsorption of polystyrene on carbon and its molecular weight de- pendence. Washington, D.C.: Office of Rubber Reserve. The concentration dependence of the molecular friction coeffi- cients of large molecules. Washington, D.C.: Office of Rubber Reserve. With P. Debye. The temperature dependence of the intrinsic vis- cosity. Washington, D.C.: Office of Rubber Reserve. With P. Debye. The measurement of the angular dependence of light scattering. Washington, D.C.: Office of Rubber Reserve. With P. Debye. Thermal diffusion of polymer solutions. In: High Polymer Physics. Brooklyn, N.Y.: Chemical Publishing. With P. Debye. Intrinsic viscosity, diffusion and sedimentation rates of polymers in solution. J. Chem. Phys., 16:573. 1949 With P. Debye. Scattering by an inhomogeneous solid. I. Appl. Phys., 20:5 18. Dimensions of coiling polymer molecules from viscosity and light scattering. l. Am. Chem. Soc., 71:1452. 1950 With P. Debye. Scattering by inhomogeneous materials. In: Colloid Chemistry, Theoretical and Applied, vol. 7, ed. Jerome Alexander. New York: Reinhold Publishing. With P. Debye. Light scattering by concentrated polymer solutions. i. Chem. Phys., 18:1423. 1951 With T. G. Fox and P. i. Flory. Treatment of osmatic and light scattering for dilute solutions. I. Am. Chem. Soc., 73:285.

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ARTHUR M. BUECHE 1952 35 Melting temperature and polymer-solvent interaction: Polychlo- rotrifluoroethylene. J. Am. Chem. Soc., 74:65. A physical theory of rubber reinforcement. J. Appl. Phys., 23: 154. 1953 Stress relaxation in elastomers. I. Chant. Phys., 21:614. With E. }. Lawton and }. S. Balwit. Irradiation of polymers by high energy electrons. Nature, 172:76. 1954 With R. C. Osthoff and W. T. Grubb. Chemical stress-relaxation of polydimethylsiloxane elastomers. }. Am. Chem. Soc., 76:4659. With E. }. Lawton and }. S. Balwit. Effect of initial molecular weight on properties of irradiated polyethylene. Ind. Eng. Chem., 46: 1703. 1955 Interaction of polydimethylsiloxanes with swelling agents. J. Po- lym. Sci., 15:97. The curing of silicone rubber with benzoyl peroxide. I. Polym. Sci., 15:105. 1956 The ultimate properties of simple elastomers. I. Polym. Sci. 19:275. An investigation of the theory of rubber elasticity using irradiated polydimethylsiloxanes. J. Polym. Sci., 19:297. With A. V. White. Kinematographic study of tensile fracture in polymers. l. Appl. Phys., 27:980. 1957 Filler reinforcement of silicone rubber. i. Polym. Sci., 25: 139. 1958 With P. i. Flory. Theory of light scattering by polymer solution. l. Polym. Sci., 27:219. With R. W. Kilb. Solution and fractionation properties of graft polymers. J. Polym. Sci., 28:285. With D. G. Flom. Surface friction and dynamic mechanical prop- erties of polymer. Wear, 2: 168.

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36 BIOGRAPHICAL MEMOIRS 1959 With J. P. Berry. The mechanisms of polymer failure. In: Fracture, pp. 265-80. New York: Technology Press and John Wiley & Sons. With D. G. Flom. Theory of rolling friction for spheres. J. Appl. Phys., 30:1725. With L. E. St. Pierre. The role of carbon dioxide in catalyzed sil- oxane cleavage. i. Phys. Chem., 63: 1338. With L. E. St. Pierre and H. A. Dewhurst. Swelling and elasticity of irradiated polydimethylsiloxanes. J. Polym. Sci., 36: 105. 1960 With C. M. Huggins and L. E. St. Pierre. Nuclear magnetic reso- nance study of molecular motion in polydimethylsiloxanes. I. Phys. Chem., 64:1304. With l. P. Berry. Ultimate strength of polymers. In: Proceedings of the Symposium on Adhesion and Cohesion, pp. 18-35. Amsterdam: Elsevier Publishing. 1963 With C. M. Huggins and L. E. St. Pierre. Further NMR studies of polydimethylsiloxanes: Effects of radiation-induced crosslink- ing. J Polym. Sci., 1 :2731. 1967 industry and the pollution problem. Environ. Sci. Technol., 1:24- 30. With C. Guy Suits. Cases of research and development in a diver- sified company. In: Applied Science and Technological Progress, pp. 297-346. Washington, D.C.: National Academy of Sciences. 1968 Today's R&D where the excitement is. Ind. Gen. Appl.,4(6):580- 82. 1969 An appraisal of MHD 1969. (Prepared for the MHD Panel of the President's Office of Science and Technology, Washington, D.C.) Schenectady, N.Y.: General Electric.

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ARTHUR M. BUECHE 37 1971 Consumer and industrial electronics. (Keynote session, IEEE '71, 1971 International Convention and Exposition on Redirecting Electro-Technology for a Better World.) Schenectady, N.Y.: General Electric. 1972 Electric utilities industry research and development goals through the year 2000. (Prepared for IEEE Power Engineering Society winter meeting, New York.) Schenectady, N.Y.: General Electric. "Technology investment" in energy sources and power generation. (Prepared for 25th annual conference, Financial Analysts Fed- eration, New York.) Schenectady, N.Y.: General Electric. The changing relationship between industry and academic science. Chem. Technol., 2(11):697-700. 1973 Energy investment risks. Electr. World, April 1, pp. 34-35. Energy options. Electrochem. Soc., 120(101: 295C-99C. 1974 The challenge to technology. In: Our Nation's Energy Crisis and Geor- gias Future, pp. 96-105. Atlanta: Georgia Institute of Technol- ogy and Georgia Power Co. Making materials R&D pay off (by asking "so what?". Mat. Sci. Eng., 16: 197-200. The supply of scientists and engineers. (Convocation address, 150th anniversary, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York.) Schenectady, N.Y.: General Electric. Diamond synthesis a continuing exploration. Proc. R. Inst. G.B., 47:287-302. London: Applied Science Publishers. 1975 Polymers and interfaces. (Convocation address, dedication of George Stafford Whitby Hall, University of Akron, Akron, Ohio). Schenectady, N.Y.: General Electric. 1976 Synthetic rubber in World War II. Science, 191:1007.

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38 BIOGRAPHICAL MEMOIRS 1978 A parallel. Chemtech, 8~7~:429-30. Investment in innovation. Mater. Soc., 2: 269 - 77. 1979 The economy. Ann. N.Y. Acad. Sci., 1979:138-53. Principles, perceptions and projections. (IRI Honor Lecture.) Schenectady, N.Y.: General Electric. The challenge of R&D leadership. (62nd annual conference, American Marketing Association.) Schenectady, N.Y.: General Electric. Innovation in the United States its states of health. (Fourth Franklin Conference, The Franklin Institute.) Schenectady, N.Y.: General Electric. 1980 New challenges for research administrators. Polym. News, 6: 193 - 96. Technology, innovation and productivity. (Colloquium for inau- guration of the Materials Processing Center, Massachusetts In- stitute of Technology.) Schenectady, N.Y.: General Electric. Innovation: issue or answer? (1980 lectures on Science, Technol- ogy, and Society, Illinois Institute of Technology.) Schenectady, N.Y.: General Electric. The hard truth about our energy future. (IEEE, 1980 conference on U.S. Technological Policy.) Schenectady, N.Y.: General Elec- tric. Responsiveness, initiative, and creativity. (Gold Medal Address, American Institute of Chemists, Inc.) Schenectady, N.Y.: Gen- eral Electric. Expanded use of electricity as a substitute for liquid fuels. (Collo- quium on Planning for an Energy Emergency, Scientists and Engineers for Secure Energy, Stanford University.) Schenec- tady, N.Y.: General Electric. Materials and energy. (ASME Centennial Lecture, 6th Inter- American Conference on Materials Technology.) Schenectady, N.Y.: General Electric.

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ARTHUR M. BUECHE 1981 39 Can cooperation replace confrontation? (Presented to National Council of Patent Law Associations.) Schenectady, N.Y.: General Electric. Government-industry relationships in the '80s. (80th anniversary lecture, National Bureau of Standards.) Schenectady, N.Y.: General Electric. 1-2. A basis for optimism. (Presented to Engineering Society of De- troit.) Schenectady, N.Y.: General Electric. Department of Energy National Laboratory relationships with in- dustry and the university community. (Statement before House Committee on Science and Technology, Subcommittee on En- ergy Development and Applications, and Subcommittee on En- ergy Research and Production.) Schenectady, N.Y.: General Electric. Some personal opinions on energy policy. Power Eng. Rev., 1~81: Physics and U.S. industry. (Presented to 1981 Meeting of Corporate Associates, American Institute of Physics.) Schenectady, N.Y.: General Electric.

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40 BIOGRAPHICAL MEMOIRS PATENTS 1955 U.S. Patent 2,710,290 ~ June 7,1955~. With M. M. Sanford. Organo- polysiloxane-Polytetrafluoroethylene Mixtures. 1957 U.S. Patent 2,805,958 (September 10, 1957~. With C. S. Oliver. Preparation of Hydrophobic Silicas. U.S. Patent 2,809,180 (October 8, 19571. With G. V. Browning. Curable Organopolysiloxane Compositions Having Hydro- lyzed Alkyl Trihalogenosilane Filler and Cured Products of Same. 1958 Up. Patent 2,858,259 (October 28, 1958~. With E. I. Lawton. Elec- tron Irradiation of Preformed Polyamide Resin. 1 959 U.S. Patent 2,906,678 (September 29, 1959~. With E. i. Lawton. Process of Irradiating Polyethylene at Elevated Temperatures. U.S. Patent 2,914,502 (November 24, 19591. Process for Curing Organopolysiloxanes with a Hydrophobic Silica and Product Thereof. 1960 U.S. Patent 2,948,329 (August 9,1960~. With G. L. Gaines, fir. Mica Paper. 1961 U.S. Patent 2,967,113 (January 3, 1961~. With H. A. Liebhafsky. Coating Method. U.S. Patent 2,993,809 ~ July 25, 19614. With C. S. Oliver. Method for Making Treated Silica Fillers. 1962 U.S. Patent 3,024,146 (March 6, 19621. With C. S. Oliver. Silicone Rubber Adhesive Containing Treated Filler. U.S. Patent 3,031,366 (April 24, 1962~. With C. S. Oliver. Degraded Organopolysiloxanes as Adhesives.

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