Author Biographies

NORMAN R. AUGUSTINE is the president of Lockheed Martin Corporation. A native of Colorado, Mr. Augustine holds a B.S.E and an M.S.E., both from Princeton University. He has been awarded honorary degrees from seven institutions. He began his career at Douglas Aircraft Company, where he held the positions of program manager and chief engineer. He then served as assistant director of defense research and engineering in the Office of the Secretary of Defense. Subsequently, he joined the LTV Missiles and Space Company, where he served as vice president for advanced programs and marketing. He then returned to the Department of Defense, where he was assistant secretary of the army and under secretary of the army. Prior to becoming president of Lockheed Martin, he served as chairman and chief executive officer of the Martin Marietta Corporation. Mr. Augustine is chairman of the National Academy of Engineering, chairman of the American Red Cross, and president of the Boy Scouts of America. He has served as chairman of the Defense Policy Advisory Committee on Trade, the Defense Science Board, the Aeronautics Panel of the Air Force Scientific Advisory Board, the Executive Council on Foreign Diplomacy, the NASA/White House Committee on the U.S. Space Program, and the NASA Space Systems and Technology Advisory Committee. Currently, he is a member of the board of directors of Phillips Petroleum, Procter & Gamble, The Planetary Society, the Atlantic Council, and the New American Schools Development Corporation. He also chairs the president's National Security Telecommunications Advisory Committee. Mr. Augustine has been awarded the Distinguished Service Medal of the Department of Defense four times and is also a recipient of the Defense Meritorious Service Medal, the Army Distinguished Service Medal, and



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THE GLOBAL AGENDA FOR AMERICAN ENGINEERING: Proceedings of a Symposium Author Biographies NORMAN R. AUGUSTINE is the president of Lockheed Martin Corporation. A native of Colorado, Mr. Augustine holds a B.S.E and an M.S.E., both from Princeton University. He has been awarded honorary degrees from seven institutions. He began his career at Douglas Aircraft Company, where he held the positions of program manager and chief engineer. He then served as assistant director of defense research and engineering in the Office of the Secretary of Defense. Subsequently, he joined the LTV Missiles and Space Company, where he served as vice president for advanced programs and marketing. He then returned to the Department of Defense, where he was assistant secretary of the army and under secretary of the army. Prior to becoming president of Lockheed Martin, he served as chairman and chief executive officer of the Martin Marietta Corporation. Mr. Augustine is chairman of the National Academy of Engineering, chairman of the American Red Cross, and president of the Boy Scouts of America. He has served as chairman of the Defense Policy Advisory Committee on Trade, the Defense Science Board, the Aeronautics Panel of the Air Force Scientific Advisory Board, the Executive Council on Foreign Diplomacy, the NASA/White House Committee on the U.S. Space Program, and the NASA Space Systems and Technology Advisory Committee. Currently, he is a member of the board of directors of Phillips Petroleum, Procter & Gamble, The Planetary Society, the Atlantic Council, and the New American Schools Development Corporation. He also chairs the president's National Security Telecommunications Advisory Committee. Mr. Augustine has been awarded the Distinguished Service Medal of the Department of Defense four times and is also a recipient of the Defense Meritorious Service Medal, the Army Distinguished Service Medal, and

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THE GLOBAL AGENDA FOR AMERICAN ENGINEERING: Proceedings of a Symposium many other awards and honors. He is a trustee of Princeton University and The Johns Hopkins University. Mr. Augustine is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the International Academy of Astronautics, the American Astronautical Society, and the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers. PAUL E. GRAY is chairman of the corporation of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). He served as president of that institution for 10 years, from 1980 to 1990. As a member of both the faculty and the administration of the institute, Dr. Gray served as associate provost, dean of engineering, and chancellor prior to becoming president. He earned B.S., M.S., and Sc.D. degrees in electrical engineering from MIT. His area of specialization is semiconductor electronics and circuit theory, and he has participated in the development of courses in electronics devices, models, and circuits, as well as core courses. Dr. Gray was involved in the establishment of the institute 's Undergraduate Research Opportunities Program, in which undergraduate students become working participants in research projects. For 4 years, Dr. Gray served as a member of the White House Science Council. He was also a member of the council's Panel on the Health of Universities and held the position of vice chairman of the Council on Competitiveness, a Washington-based organization that includes representatives from business, labor, and academia. As part of his long-standing interest in improving educational opportunities for minorities and women, he served on the Committee on Minorities in Engineering of the National Research Council. He is a director of the Boeing Company, The New England (of Boston), the Eastman Kodak Company, and Arthur D. Little, Inc. Dr. Gray has been awarded honorary degrees from Wheaton College, Northeastern University, the Technical University of Nova Scotia, Cairo University, and Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. A member of the National Academy of Engineering, where he currently serves as treasurer, Dr. Gray is also a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. He is a member of Eta Kappa Nu, Tau Beta Pi, and Sigma Xi. JOHN HURLEY is associate vice president at the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, where he works closely with the senior vice president in the management of the foundation's international and domestic grantmaking. He has a B.A. from DePauw University and an M.A. from Virginia Tech. Before joining the MacArthur Foundation in 1992, Mr. Hurley was involved in scientific and technological collaboration with developing countries as director of the National Research Council 's (NRC) Board on Science and Technology for International Development from 1982 to 1991. From 1981 to 1984, Mr. Hurley also acted as deputy head of the NRC's Office of International Affairs. Mr. Hurley became involved with international issues through his work with the Peace Corps before joining the NRC staff in 1970. He was one of the earliest Peace Corps volunteers, serving in Malaysia as a science teacher and later held several admin-

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THE GLOBAL AGENDA FOR AMERICAN ENGINEERING: Proceedings of a Symposium istrative positions with the agency, including Peace Corps director for Fiji and director of evaluation. VICTOR RABINOWITCH is senior vice president of the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation and served before that as the foundation's vice president for programs. He holds a B.S. degree in ecology from the University of Wisconsin and received an M.S. and a Ph.D. in zoology and international relations. Prior to his work with the MacArthur Foundation, Dr. Rabinowitch was for 25 years associated with the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) and the National Research Council (NRC) in various programs relating to international science and technology. He served as director of the NRC's Board on Science and Technology for International Development and subsequently was appointed executive director of the Office of International Affairs. Dr. Rabinowitch was also the director of the NAS Committee on International Security and Arms Control. A longtime participant in Pugwash conferences on science and world affairs, he has been involved in two major areas of Pugwash concern: world peace and international development. He was a member of the U.S. delegation to the United Nations Conference on Science and Technology for Development. He is a member of the board of the Energy Foundation and of the council of the United Nations University. Dr. Rabinowitch is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and the Economic Club of Chicago. H. GUYFORD STEVER, science advisor and trustee, is a board member of Science Service, Universities Research Association, and Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. He holds a B.A. degree from Colgate University, a Ph.D. degree in physics from the California Institute of Technology, and numerous honorary degrees. Dr. Stever was a member of the Carnegie Commission on Science, Technology, and Government from 1988 to 1993 and was director of the National Science Foundation (NSF) from 1972 to 1976, during which time he also served as science advisor to Presidents Nixon and Ford. He was director of the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy from 1976 to 1977. Before joining NSF, Dr. Stever was a professor and department head at Massachusetts Institute of Technology, from 1945 to 1965, and president of Carnegie Mellon University, from 1965 to 1972. From 1945 to 1990, he served variously as a director and/or consultant to 20 industrial corporations, including United Aircraft, Goodyear, TRW, Schering-Plough, and Fisher Scientific. After receiving his Ph.D. in 1941, he became a staff member at the MIT Radiation Laboratory. In 1942, he took a position in Dr. Vannevar Bush's Office of Scientific Research and Development at its London Mission, service which included seven radar and guided missiles technical intelligence missions to France, Belgium, Holland, and Germany following D Day. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering, the National Academy of Sciences, and the American Acad

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THE GLOBAL AGENDA FOR AMERICAN ENGINEERING: Proceedings of a Symposium emy of Arts and Sciences; a fellow of the American Physical Society, the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, the Royal Aeronautical Society, and the Royal Society of Arts; a foreign associate of the Japan Academy of Engineering and a foreign member of the British Royal Academy of Engineering. He has received the President's Certificate of Merit for his work in World War II, the Commander of the Order of Merit of Poland, and Distinguished Public Service Medals of the Department of Defense and of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. In 1991, Dr. Stever was awarded the National Medal of Science. MICHIYUKI UENOHARA is executive advisor of NEC Corporation in Tokyo, Japan. He also serves as chairman of NEC Research Institute in Princeton, New Jersey, and chairman of the board of trustees at NEC Research Institute for Advanced Management Systems in Tokyo. Dr. Uenohara received his B.S. degree from Nihon University in Tokyo and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees from Ohio State University, all in electrical engineering. Before joining NEC, he worked at Bell Laboratories for 10 years. At NEC, he served as general manager of the Central Research Laboratories both before and after he was elected to the board of directors. In 1989, he resigned as senior executive vice president and director and took his present position. Dr. Uenohara represents Japan as a member of the High-Level Advisory Panel, which was established following a U.S.-Japan agreement on cooperation in research and development in science and technology, and he serves on various government councils, including the Higher Education Council of the Ministry of Education, Science and Culture. He is a fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, a member of the Engineering Academy of Japan, and a foreign associate of both the U.S. National Academy of Engineering and the Swedish Royal Academy of Engineering Sciences.