D

Biographies of Committee Members

CARROLL L.ESTES, Ph.D., Chair, is a professor in the Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences, School of Nursing, and director of the Institute for Health and Aging, University of California, San Francisco. She is a consultant to federal and state legislative committees, a member of the Institute of Medicine, and past president of both the American Society on Aging and the Association for Gerontology in Higher Education. Recipient of an honorary doctorate in human letters from Russell Sage College (1986), the American Society on Aging Award (1988), and the Kent Award of the Gerontological Society of America (1991), among other honors, she conducts research on social policy and aging, health and long term care, the nonprofit sector, older women, and generational equity. Best known for The Aging Enterprise (1979) and Political Economy, Health and Aging (1984), she is author and coauthor of five other books and more than 100 articles. Dr. Estes earned her doctorate in sociology from the University of California, San Francisco.

JANICE M.CALDWELL, Dr. P.H., received her doctorate in health administration in 1977 from the School of Public Health, University of North Carolina. She earned a masters degree in health and safety from California State University, Los Angeles, in 1970. Since 1982, Dr. Caldwell has held a variety of positions with the Texas Department of Health and the Department of Human Services, recently (1991–1993) as chief of the Bureau of Long Term Care, a position bearing responsibility for quality assurance, staff development, and ensuring compliance with state and federal requirements for licensure and certification of long-term care facilities. Since March 1993, Dr. Caldwell has served as the executive director of the newly established Texas Department of Protective and Regulatory Services—the state agency



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Real People Real Problems: An Evaluation of the Long-Term Care Ombudsman Programs of the Older Americans Act D Biographies of Committee Members CARROLL L.ESTES, Ph.D., Chair, is a professor in the Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences, School of Nursing, and director of the Institute for Health and Aging, University of California, San Francisco. She is a consultant to federal and state legislative committees, a member of the Institute of Medicine, and past president of both the American Society on Aging and the Association for Gerontology in Higher Education. Recipient of an honorary doctorate in human letters from Russell Sage College (1986), the American Society on Aging Award (1988), and the Kent Award of the Gerontological Society of America (1991), among other honors, she conducts research on social policy and aging, health and long term care, the nonprofit sector, older women, and generational equity. Best known for The Aging Enterprise (1979) and Political Economy, Health and Aging (1984), she is author and coauthor of five other books and more than 100 articles. Dr. Estes earned her doctorate in sociology from the University of California, San Francisco. JANICE M.CALDWELL, Dr. P.H., received her doctorate in health administration in 1977 from the School of Public Health, University of North Carolina. She earned a masters degree in health and safety from California State University, Los Angeles, in 1970. Since 1982, Dr. Caldwell has held a variety of positions with the Texas Department of Health and the Department of Human Services, recently (1991–1993) as chief of the Bureau of Long Term Care, a position bearing responsibility for quality assurance, staff development, and ensuring compliance with state and federal requirements for licensure and certification of long-term care facilities. Since March 1993, Dr. Caldwell has served as the executive director of the newly established Texas Department of Protective and Regulatory Services—the state agency

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Real People Real Problems: An Evaluation of the Long-Term Care Ombudsman Programs of the Older Americans Act responsible for adult protective services and for child protective services. Dr. Caldwell served as director of the Division of Long Term Care, Health Care Financing Administration (1978–1980) and as executive director of the Gerontological Society of America (1980–1982). DONALD L.CUSTIS, M.D., is a graduate of Northwestern University Medical School (1943) and both served his residency and was a surgical fellow at the Virginia Mason Hospital/Clinic in Seattle, Washington. He served in several active duty positions in the U.S. Navy from 1944 to 1976 and also conducted a private practice. From 1976–1984, he held positions with the Veterans Administration, the last being chief medical director (1980–1984). Dr. Custis has been with Paralyzed Veterans of America since 1984, most recently serving as senior medical advisor, and continues as a consultant. He is an active member of veterans service organizations and medical societies. Dr. Custis is called upon frequently to testify before Congress on behalf of the health care needs of disabled veterans. WORTH B.DANIELS, JR., M.D., is a graduate of the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine (1948) and served internships and residencies at Vanderbilt Hospital, Duke Hospital, and Baltimore City Hospitals. He conducted a private practice in internal medicine in the Baltimore area from 1958 to the late 1980s. Since 1977, he has held an associate professor of medicine appointment at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine. Dr. Daniels is an Institute of Medicine member and has served on the IOM Board on Health Promotion and Disease Prevention and the Committee to Revise the IOM Charter. He currently serves as the medical director of Union Memorial Hospital Hospice. REBECCA D.ELON, M.D., M.P.H., joined the faculty of the Division of Geriatric Medicine and Gerontology, Department of Internal Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in 1991. In 1994, she became medical director of the Johns Hopkins Geriatrics Center. As a recipient of a W.K. Kellogg Foundation National Fellowship Award (1989–1992), Dr. Elon has studied health policy issues related to long term care. She is studying the organization and delivery of medical services in community nursing facilities and has completed a study comparing the current role of nursing facility medical directors to the role outlined in the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations’ Long-Term Care Standards Manual. Prior to joining the Hopkins geriatrics faculty, Dr. Elon was medical director of The Washington Home and a faculty member of the George Washington University School of Medicine in Washington, D.C. She received her master’s degree in public health in 1991 from the University of Texas Health Science Center in Houston. Her medical degree, residency in internal medicine, and fellowship

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Real People Real Problems: An Evaluation of the Long-Term Care Ombudsman Programs of the Older Americans Act in geriatric medicine were completed at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston. CHRISTINE GIANOPOULOS, M.P.A., has been director of the Bureau of Elder and Adult Services in Maine since 1987. The bureau administers all state and federally funded programs for the elderly; the adult protective and public guardianship programs; and Medicaid and state-funded communitybased care services. Prior to that, she was a research associate at the University of Southern Maine’s Edmund S.Muskie Institute on Public Affairs, specializing in the areas of vocational rehabilitation and independent living. She holds a B.A. in economics from the University of Pittsburgh and a M.P.A. from Syracuse University. Her professional and community affiliations include serving as vice president of the National Association of State Units on Aging (NASUA), board member of the Maine chapter of the American Society of Public Administration, and board member of School Administrative District 52. She also serves as chair of NASUA’s Ombudsman Subcommittee. ELMA L.HOLDER, M.S.P.H., has been the director of the National Citizens’ Coalition for Nursing Home Reform since 1978. She started her nursing facility work in the Oklahoma State Health Department, Medicare survey division, after obtaining a master of science degree in public health from the University of Oklahoma. Ms. Holder moved her work to Washington, D.C. in 1970, to become health consultant for the National Council on Aging. Subsequent work included two and a half years as coordinator of Ralph Nader’s Retired Professional Action Group and two years as coordinator of the National Gray Panthers Long-Term Care Task Force. In 1977, she coauthored the book Nursing Homes: A Citizens’ Action Guide. Ms. Holder was one of the key organizers of the Coalition for Nursing Home Reform in 1975. The organization now has 300 member groups. In her work as executive director Ms. Holder serves on numerous committees, such as the Health Care Financing Administration’s Advisory Committee for the Case-Mix Reimbursement System Demonstration Projects. She works with a 20-member board of directors and 10 staff members. National Citizens’ Coalition for Nursing Home Reform serves as the coordinating organization for the Campaign for Quality Care, and over 40 national organizations participate in work relating to implementation of the new nursing facility reform law. In October 1992, Ms. Holder was named recipient of the Allied-Signal 1992 Achievement Award in Aging for her leadership in health related to aging. ROSALIE A.KANE, D.S.W., earned her master’s degree from Simmons College School of Social Work in 1965 and her doctorate from the University of Utah School of Social Work in 1975. She is a professor in the Institute for

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Real People Real Problems: An Evaluation of the Long-Term Care Ombudsman Programs of the Older Americans Act Health Services Research at the University of Minnesota and at the School of Social Work, and is on the faculty of the Center for Biomedical Ethics. She is nationally recognized for her research and scholarship on the organization and financing of long-term care services for elderly and disabled people. Her current research deals with home care quality, nursing facility quality, assisted living programs as an alternative to nursing facilities, Alzheimer’s special care units in nursing facilities, family caregiving for the elderly, case management, assessment, and ethics and values related to long term care. Since 1988, she has headed the National Resource Center on Long Term Care, funded by the Administration on Aging, which provides technical assistance, disseminates information, and conducts research and development to foster state and local community long-term care programs. She served on the Institute of Medicine’s Committee on Nursing Home Regulation (1983–1985). VIVIAN OMAGBEMI, M.S., R.N., is the long-term care ombudsman for the Montgomery County Division of Elder Affairs in Wheaton, Maryland, a position she has held since 1983. Prior to this appointment, she was a community health nurse for the Montgomery County Health Department in Rockville, Maryland, a nurse practitioner in occupational health at Howard University in Washington, D.C., and an assistant coordinator in the Summer Food Program, Community Action Program for Montgomery County Government in Rockville, Maryland. She has also worked for the Washington, D.C. Chapter of the American Red Cross as a graduate student trainee. She holds a B.S. in nursing from Adelphi University in New York and a master of science degree in nursing from Catholic University in Washington, D.C. She is also a registered nurse in the state of Maryland. MARY D.POOLE, M.A., FAHP, retired in 1992 from Presbyterian Healthcare Services (PHS), where she held several positions over a 16-year career. Ms. Poole served as executive vice president of PHS’s foundation and frequently interacted with community groups in generating philanthropic contributions for PHS, a network of hospitals, nursing facilities, home health agencies, and other health-related organizations in New Mexico and Southern Colorado. Ms. Poole holds a master of arts degree in public administration and is a fellow of the Association for Healthcare Philanthropy. She has a distinguished roster of volunteer activities, several with groups related to health care, and currently works as a freelance consultant in fund development for nonprofit organizations. JOANNE RADER, R.N., M.N., earned her master of nursing degree (with a specialty in psychiatric mental health) at the Oregon Health Sciences University in 1979. Her bachelor of science degree in nursing was earned at the University of Maryland in 1968. From 1977–1989, Ms. Rader was on the

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Real People Real Problems: An Evaluation of the Long-Term Care Ombudsman Programs of the Older Americans Act staff of the Benedictine Nursing Center as a clinical specialist in mental health nursing. Currently she holds the position of clinical research fellow at the Benedictine Institute for Long Term Care. Since 1983, she has been on the faculty of the Oregon Health Sciences University School of Nursing, currently as assistant professor. Ms. Rader’s research interests include care of the cognitively impaired elderly client, restraint-free care, decreasing aggressive behaviors related to bathing, and other strategies for coping with problematic behavioral symptoms related to dementia. Ms. Rader serves as cochair of the Restraint Reduction Task Force of the practice subcommittee of the Gerontological Society of America. She has published widely and is frequently sought as a speaker. She recently edited a book, Compassionate Common Sense Dementia Care: An Individualized Approach, to be published by Springer Publishing Company, New York, 1995. CHARLES P.SABATINO, J.D., is the assistant director of the American Bar Association Commission on Legal Problems of the Elderly. He is responsible for research, project development, and education in the areas of health law, long term care, decision making, and legal services delivery for the elderly. He is also an adjunct professor at Georgetown University Law Center, where he teaches a seminar on law and aging. Formerly, he was an attorney for the Elderly Law Project and a managing attorney for Legal Services of Northern Virginia, a publicly funded law firm. He received his A.B. from Cornell University and his J.D. from Georgetown University Law Center and is a member of the District of Columbia and Virginia bars and the National Academy of Elder Law Attorneys. He has written several reports and articles on home care regulation, consumer and patient rights, and retirement housing options since his 1986 report issued by the House Select Committee on Aging, The “Black Box” of Home Care Quality. He is also a coauthor of A Practical Guide to Nursing Home Advocacy by Legal Counsel for the Elderly/AARP. JEANNE V.SANDERS, M.S., has worked in long term care since 1974. For 16 years she has been the administrator of Golden View Health Care Center in Meredith, New Hampshire, a 100-resident nursing facility. Ms. Sanders copurchased the facility in 1984. She is a past president of the New Hampshire Health Care Association and has served on its board of directors, holding various offices for the past 15 years. She has also served as deputy vice president and secretary/treasurer of Region I for the American Health Care Association. In addition, she is a member of the American College of Health Care Administrators. Ms. Sanders represents Region I of the American Health Care Association on the national Facility Standards Committee, of which she is vice chair, and has chaired the American Health Care Association Committee on Long Term Care Clinical Guidelines. Throughout her health

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Real People Real Problems: An Evaluation of the Long-Term Care Ombudsman Programs of the Older Americans Act care career, Ms. Sanders has served on numerous regional, state, and local committees. She has devoted much of her time to being a resident and provider advocate. She attended the State University of New York at Oneonta and received a B.S. degree in 1967. In 1974, she received a M.S. degree from Queens College, City College of New York. PETER W.SHAUGHNESSY, Ph.D., is professor of medicine and has served as director of the Center for Health Services Research at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center since 1976. His doctorate is in mathematical statistics, and his chief research and teaching interests are in health policy, health services research, long term care, and quality measurement and assurance in home health care. He has been principal investigator on several national studies of home health care, nursing facility care, and hospital swing-bed care. Current studies deal with developing a comprehensive system of quality measures for home health care and assessing long-term care modalities under various payment approaches and regulatory practices. He has served on several national advisory committees, IOM’s Committee on Nursing Home Regulation (1983–1985), and is a fellow of the Gerontological Society of America. JOHN H.SKINNER, Ed.D., earned his doctorate in social gerontology from Teachers College, Columbia University, in 1974. In 1989, he became associate professor and associate dean at the College of Public Health, University of South Florida, where he taught courses in long-term care policy and management and public health issues in aging. In 1994, he became associate professor and director of graduate studies in the Department of Gerontology, College of Arts and Sciences. He is a fellow and past officer of the Gerontological Society of America; a member of the board of the Florida Council on Aging; and a member of the advisory board of the National Academy of Aging at Howard University. He has served as a consultant on the health and social services concerns of minority elderly to several national organizations, including the American Association of Retired Persons and the National Center and Caucus on the Black Aged. Dr. Skinner is an acknowledged scholar in the continuum of housing options for the elderly and disabled populations, having served as a member of several research and investigator teams. He has recently authored a chapter on “Aging in Place: The Experience of African American and Other Minority Elders” in the book Aging in Place edited by James J.Callahan, Jr., and printed by Baywood Publishing Company, Inc. (Generations and Aging Series, 1993). HOLLIS TURNHAM, J.D., is the state long-term care ombudsman for Michigan, a position she has held since 1983. She is employed by Citizens for

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Real People Real Problems: An Evaluation of the Long-Term Care Ombudsman Programs of the Older Americans Act Better Care in Lansing, Michigan. Prior to that, she was a staff attorney for Legal Services of Southeastern Michigan in Jackson, Michigan, and a consumer fellow at the National Consumer Law Center in Boston, Massachusetts. She earned a B.A. from Stephen F.Austin State University and a J.D. from the University of Texas. She has served on the council of the Senior Justice Section of the State Bar of Michigan, as treasurer of the National Association of State Long-Term Care Ombudsman Programs, and on the Senior Advisory Council of Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Michigan. In 1991, Ms. Turnham received the V.K.Volk Award from the Michigan Society of Gerontology for outstanding contributions toward improving health care for older persons in Michigan.

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