APPENDIX B

Committee Biographies

ALAN R. NELSON, M.D. (Chair), is currently the executive vice president of the American Society of Internal Medicine. Before assuming that role in 1992, he had a private practice in internal medicine and endocrinology for almost 30 years in Salt Lake City, Utah. He received his medical degree from Northwestern University. From 1964 to 1992, he was a clinical professor in the Department of Internal Medicine at the University of Utah College of Medicine. He was elected to membership in the Institute of Medicine (IOM) in 1975 and has served on numerous IOM committees. He is a former president of the American Medical Association (1989–1990) and of the World Medical Association (1991–1992), has served as a member of the Board of Commissioners of the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Hospitals (1983–1987), and has received many other honors and awards. He is author or coauthor of numerous scientific or socioeconomic publications.

MICHAEL J. DEMMER is the executive vice president of the Kensington Management Group, which oversees a group of assisted living facilities in Minnesota, North Dakota, and New Mexico. In that role he provides guidance and leadership to Kensington executive directors throughout the country. In addition, he participates in market research and financial feasibility studies for prospective new projects and oversees all budgeting, financial performance, marketing, and operational systems. He is also responsible for the overall management of Kensington Cottages projects, which specialize in the care of people with Alzheimer' s disease and related dementias. Mr. Demmer serves as a member of the Board of Directors of the Minnesota Association of Homes for the Aged (MAHA); MAHA has also appointed him to represent it on the state



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Best at Home: Assuring Quality Long-Term Care in Home and Community-Based Settings APPENDIX B Committee Biographies ALAN R. NELSON, M.D. (Chair), is currently the executive vice president of the American Society of Internal Medicine. Before assuming that role in 1992, he had a private practice in internal medicine and endocrinology for almost 30 years in Salt Lake City, Utah. He received his medical degree from Northwestern University. From 1964 to 1992, he was a clinical professor in the Department of Internal Medicine at the University of Utah College of Medicine. He was elected to membership in the Institute of Medicine (IOM) in 1975 and has served on numerous IOM committees. He is a former president of the American Medical Association (1989–1990) and of the World Medical Association (1991–1992), has served as a member of the Board of Commissioners of the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Hospitals (1983–1987), and has received many other honors and awards. He is author or coauthor of numerous scientific or socioeconomic publications. MICHAEL J. DEMMER is the executive vice president of the Kensington Management Group, which oversees a group of assisted living facilities in Minnesota, North Dakota, and New Mexico. In that role he provides guidance and leadership to Kensington executive directors throughout the country. In addition, he participates in market research and financial feasibility studies for prospective new projects and oversees all budgeting, financial performance, marketing, and operational systems. He is also responsible for the overall management of Kensington Cottages projects, which specialize in the care of people with Alzheimer' s disease and related dementias. Mr. Demmer serves as a member of the Board of Directors of the Minnesota Association of Homes for the Aged (MAHA); MAHA has also appointed him to represent it on the state

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Best at Home: Assuring Quality Long-Term Care in Home and Community-Based Settings level in developing the rules for residential care homes and new negotiated rate rules. He is also a member of the Assisted Living Facilities of America. Mr. Demmer graduated from St. Cloud State University with a teaching degree. CARROLL L. ESTES, Ph.D., is a professor in the Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences, School of Nursing, and director of the Institute of Health and Aging, University of California, San Francisco. She is a consultant to federal and state legislative committees, a member of the IOM, past-president of both the American Society on Aging and the Association for Gerontology in Higher Education, and current president of the Gerontological Society of America. Dr. Estes earned her doctorate in sociology from the University of California, San Francisco. Dr. Estes is the recipient of an honorary doctorate in human letters from Russell Sage College (1986), the American Society on Aging award (1988), and the Kent Award of the Gerontological Society of America (1991), among other honors. Her research interests include social policy and aging, health and long-term care, the nonprofit sector, older women, and generational equity. Best known for The Aging Enterprise and Political Economy, Health and Aging, she is author or coauthor of five other books and more than 100 articles. She served as chair of the IOM's Committee to Evaluate the State Long-Term Care Ombudsman Program (1993–1994). CHRISTINE GIANOPOULOS, M.P.A., has been director of the Bureau of Elder and Adult Services in Maine since 1987. The bureau administers all state and federally funded programs for the elderly; the adult protective and public guardianship programs; and Medicaid and state-funded community-based care services. Prior to that, she was a research associate at the University of Southern Maine's Edmund S. Muskie Institute on Public Affairs, specializing in the areas of vocational rehabilitation and independent living. She holds a B.A. in economics from the University of Pittsburgh and an M.P.A. from Syracuse University. Her professional and community affiliations include serving as president of the National Association of State Units on Aging, board member of the Maine chapter of the American Society of Public Administration, and board member of School Administrative District 52. She served on the IOM's Committee to Evaluate the State Long-Term Care Ombudsman Program (1993–1994). ROSALIE A. KANE, D.S.W., earned her master's degree from Simmons College School of Social Work in 1965 and her doctorate from the University of Utah School of Social Work in 1975. She is a professor in the Institute for Health Services Research at the University of Minnesota and at the School of Social Work, and is on the faculty of the Center for Biomedical Ethics. She is nationally recognized for her research and scholarship on the organization and

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Best at Home: Assuring Quality Long-Term Care in Home and Community-Based Settings financing of long-term-care services for elderly and disabled people. Her current research deals with home care quality, nursing home quality, assisted living programs as an alternative to nursing homes, Alzheimer 's special care units in nursing homes, family caregiving for the elderly, case management, assessment, and ethics and values related to long-term care. Since 1988, she has headed a National Resource Center on Long-Term Care, funded by the Administration on Aging, which provides technical assistance, disseminates information, and does research and development to foster state and local community long-term-care programs. She served on the IOM's Committee on Nursing Home Regulation (1983–1985) and on the Committee to Evaluate the State Long-Term Care Ombudsman Program (1993–1994). DENNIS S. O'LEARY, M.D., is president of the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations. Prior to joining the Joint Commission, Dr. O'Leary served as dean for Clinical Affairs at the George Washington University Medical Center and vice president of the George Washington University Health Plan, an academic Health Maintenance Organization. Dr. O' Leary earned his B.A. from Harvard College and his M.D. from Cornell University. After two years of internal medicine training at the University of Minnesota Hospital, he completed his residency at Strong Memorial Hospital in Rochester, New York. Following his residency, he served an additional year as chief resident in medicine and fellow in hematology. He is board certified in internal medicine and hematology. Dr. O'Leary has been highly active in a variety of professional capacities. He has served as president and chairman of the board of the District of Columbia Medical Society, was a founding member of the National Capital Area Health Care Coalition, and was the first chairman of the Editorial Advisory Board for Medical Staff News. In addition, Dr. O'Leary has been a leading advocate in Washington and around the country for the inclusion of quality as an integral component of health care reform. JAMES M. PERRIN, M.D., is an associate professor of pediatrics at Harvard Medical School and director of the Division of General Pediatrics at the Massachusetts General Hospital. He is a member of the National Commission on Childhood Disability and the Disability Policy Panel of the National Academy of Social Insurance. He also chairs the American Academy of Pediatrics Committee on Children with Disabilities and the Public Policy Committee of the Ambulatory Pediatric Association. A graduate of Harvard College and Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, he had his training in pediatrics at the University of Rochester and has been on the pediatric faculties of the University of Rochester and Vanderbilt University, with an additional appointment in the Institute for Public Policy Studies at Vanderbilt. His research has examined asthma, middle ear disease, children's hospitalization, and childhood

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Best at Home: Assuring Quality Long-Term Care in Home and Community-Based Settings chronic illness and disabilities, with a recent emphasis on studies of the Supplemental Security Income program for children and adolescents. He coauthored Chronically Ill Children and Their Families and Home and Community Care for Chronically Ill Children. He served on the IOM's Committee on Maternal and Child Health under Health Care Reform (1994). RUBY VAN CROFT, R.N., is currently director of Community Relations for the Visiting Nurses Association for Washington, D.C., and suburban Maryland. She has held a variety of positions at the Visiting Nurses Association, including director of Special Programs, assistant director for Contracts and Grants, and assistant director for Services. She also serves as president of the Capital Home Health Association. In addition to her direct service responsibilities, for the past 15 years she has taught graduate-level management courses at several universities in the Washington, D.C., area. Ms. Van Croft received her nursing diploma from Freedmen's School of Nursing, a bachelor's degree from Columbia Union College, and a master's degree in Public Health Nursing from the University of Maryland.