Biographical Sketches of Panel Members and Staff

JOHN E. ROLPH (Chair) is professor of statistics and chair of the Department of Information and Operations Management in the University of Southern California School of Business. He previously was on the research staff of the RAND Corporation. He has also held faculty positions at University College London, Columbia University, the RAND Graduate School for Policy Studies, and the Health Policy Center of RAND/University of California, Los Angeles. His research interests include empirical Bayes methods and the application of statistics to health policy, civil justice, criminal justice, and other policy areas. He is editor of the American Statistical Association magazine Chance, and he currently serves as vice chair of the National Research Council 's Committee on National Statistics. He is a fellow of the American Statistical Association, the Institute of Mathematical Statistics, the American Association for the Advancement of Science and is a member of the International Statistical Institute. He received A.B. and Ph.D. degrees in statistics from the University of California, Berkeley.

MARION R. BRYSON has retired after holding many positions in the federal government, 22 years primarily in the operational test arena. He served as scientific advisor at CDEC, director of CDEC, and technical director of the Test and Experimentation Command. Prior to his government service, he taught in several colleges and universities, including Duke University. He is a past president and fellow of the Military Operations Research Society. He is the recipient of the Vance Wanner Memorial Award in Military Operations Research and the Samuel S. Wilks Award in Army Experimental Design. He holds a Ph.D. degree in statistics from Iowa State University.

HERMAN CHERNOFF is professor of statistics in the Department of Statistics at Harvard University. He previously held professorships at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Stanford University, and the University of Illinois at Urbana. His current research centers on applications of statistics to genetics and molecular biology, and his past work specialized in large sample theory, sequential analysis, and optimal design of experiments. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and has served as president of the Institute of Mathematical



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Statistical Methods for Testing and Evaluating Defense Systems: Interim Report Biographical Sketches of Panel Members and Staff JOHN E. ROLPH (Chair) is professor of statistics and chair of the Department of Information and Operations Management in the University of Southern California School of Business. He previously was on the research staff of the RAND Corporation. He has also held faculty positions at University College London, Columbia University, the RAND Graduate School for Policy Studies, and the Health Policy Center of RAND/University of California, Los Angeles. His research interests include empirical Bayes methods and the application of statistics to health policy, civil justice, criminal justice, and other policy areas. He is editor of the American Statistical Association magazine Chance, and he currently serves as vice chair of the National Research Council 's Committee on National Statistics. He is a fellow of the American Statistical Association, the Institute of Mathematical Statistics, the American Association for the Advancement of Science and is a member of the International Statistical Institute. He received A.B. and Ph.D. degrees in statistics from the University of California, Berkeley. MARION R. BRYSON has retired after holding many positions in the federal government, 22 years primarily in the operational test arena. He served as scientific advisor at CDEC, director of CDEC, and technical director of the Test and Experimentation Command. Prior to his government service, he taught in several colleges and universities, including Duke University. He is a past president and fellow of the Military Operations Research Society. He is the recipient of the Vance Wanner Memorial Award in Military Operations Research and the Samuel S. Wilks Award in Army Experimental Design. He holds a Ph.D. degree in statistics from Iowa State University. HERMAN CHERNOFF is professor of statistics in the Department of Statistics at Harvard University. He previously held professorships at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Stanford University, and the University of Illinois at Urbana. His current research centers on applications of statistics to genetics and molecular biology, and his past work specialized in large sample theory, sequential analysis, and optimal design of experiments. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and has served as president of the Institute of Mathematical

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Statistical Methods for Testing and Evaluating Defense Systems: Interim Report Statistics, and associate editor of several statistical journals. He is a fellow of the Institute of Mathematical Statistics and the American Statistical Association. He received a B.S. degree in mathematics from City College of New York, Sc.M. and Ph.D. degrees in applied mathematics from Brown University, an honorary A.M. degree from Harvard University, and honorary Sc.D. degrees from the Ohio State University and Technion. JOHN D. CHRISTIE is a senior fellow and assistant to the president at the Logistics Management Institute, a nonprofit institution in McLean, Virginia. Before joining the institute he was the Director, Acquisition Policy & Program Integration for the Undersecretary of Defense (Acquisition) in the U.S. Department of Defense. Prior to that he was vice president of two different professional service firms, while also serving for 7 years as a member of the Army Science Board. During an earlier period of government service he held various positions at the Federal Energy Administration and the Defense Department. Previously, he was a member of the Bell Labs technical staff. He holds S.B., S.M., E.M.E., and Sc.D. degrees from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, all in mechanical engineering. MICHAEL L. COHEN is a senior program officer for the Committee on National Statistics. Previously, he was a mathematical statistician at the Energy Information Administration, an assistant professor in the School of Public Affairs at the University of Maryland, a research associate at the Committee on National Statistics, and a visiting lecturer at the Department of Statistics, Princeton University. His general area of research is the use of statistics in public policy, with particular interest in census undercount and model validation. He is also interested in robust estimation. He received a B.S. degree in mathematics from the University of Michigan and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in statistics from Stanford University. CANDICE S. EVANS is a project assistant with the Committee on National Statistics. She is also currently working with the Panel on Retirement Income Modeling and has been steering the report of the Panel on International Capital Transactions, Following the Money: U.S. Finance in the World Economy, through the review process to final publication. LOUIS GORDON is a statistician at the Filoli Information Systems Corporation. He has previously held academic appointments at the University of Southern California and at Stanford University. He has also worked as a statistician in industry and in the federal government. He has held J.S. Guggenheim and Fulbright fellowships. His research interests are in nonparametric statistics. KATHRYN BLACKMOND LASKEY is an associate professor of systems engineering at George Mason University. She was previously a principal scientist at Decision Science Consortium, Inc. Her primary research interest is the study of decision theoretically based knowledge representation and inference strategies for automated reasoning under uncertainty. She has worked on methods for automated construction of Bayesian belief networks and for recognizing when a system's current problem model is inadequate. She has worked with domain experts to develop Bayesian belief network models to be used in automated reasoning. She received a B.S. degree in mathematics from the University of Pittsburgh, an M.S. degree in mathematics from the University of Michigan, and a joint Ph.D. in statistics and public affairs from Carnegie Mellon University.

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Statistical Methods for Testing and Evaluating Defense Systems: Interim Report ROBERT C. MARSHALL is a professor and head of the Department of Economics at Penn State University. Previously, he taught at Duke University. His research—using theoretical, empirical, and numerical methods of analysis—has included a broad range of topics—housing, labor, the expected utility paradigm, and measurements of mobility. He is best known for his work on auctions and procurements, which has focused on collusion by bidders. He received an A.B. degree from Princeton University and a Ph.D. degree from the University of California, San Diego. VIJAYAN N. NAIR is professor of statistics and professor of industrial and operations engineering at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. Previously, he was a research scientist at AT&T Bell Laboratories. His research interests include statistical methods in manufacturing, quality improvement, robust design, design of experiments, process control, and reliability engineering. He has taught courses and workshops on these areas both at Michigan and at Bell Labs. He also has extensive practical experience in applying these methods in industry. He is a fellow of the American Statistical Association, a fellow of the Institute of Mathematical Statistics, an elected member of the International Statistical Institute, and a senior member of the American Society for Quality Control. He is a past editor of Technometrics and a past coordinating editor of the Journal of Statistical Planning and Inference, and he currently serves on the editorial boards of five journals. He has a B. Econs. (Hons.) degree from the University of Malaya and a Ph.D. in statistics from the University of California, Berkeley. ROBERT T. O'NEILL is director of the Office of Epidemiology and Biostatistics and Acting Director of the Division of Epidemiology and Surveillance in the Center for Drug Evaluation and Research (CDER) of the Food and Drug Administration. He is responsible for postmarketing surveillance and safety of new drugs, and for providing statistical support to all programs of CDER, which include advice in all drug/disease areas on the design, analysis, and evaluation of clinical trials performed by sponsors seeking approval to market new drugs. He is a fellow of the American Statistical Association and a former member of the board of directors of the Society for Clinical Trials, and he is active in several professional societies. He received a B.A. degree from the College of the Holy Cross and a Ph.D. degree in mathematical statistics and biometry from Catholic University of America. ANU PEMMARAZU is a research assistant with the Committee on National Statistics, National Research Council. In addition to the Panel on Statistical Methods for Testing and Evaluating Defense Systems, she is currently working on projects related to public health performance partnership grants and priorities for data on the aging population. She previously worked on the Panel on the National Health Care Survey and the Panel to Evaluate Alternative Census Methods. She received a B.S. degree in mathematics from the University of Maryland, College Park, and is currently pursuing a masters degree in computer and information science. STEPHEN M. POLLOCK is professor of industrial and operations engineering at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. Previously, he served as a consultant at Arthur D. Little, Inc., and as a member of the faculty at the Naval Postgraduate School. He teaches courses in stochastic processes, decision analysis, and reliability and mathematical modeling and has engaged in a variety of research areas and methods, including search theory, sequential detection of change, queuing systems, criminal recidivism, police patrol, and filling processes. He also serves as a consultant to more than 30 companies and other organizations. He is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and has been senior editor of IIE Transactions, area editor of Operations Research, and president of the Opera-

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Statistical Methods for Testing and Evaluating Defense Systems: Interim Report tions Research Society of America. He holds a B. Eng. Phys. from Cornell and S.M. and Ph.D. degrees in physics and operations research from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. JESSE POORE is professor of computer science at the University of Tennessee and president of Software Engineering Technology, Inc. He conducts research in cleanroom software engineering and teaches software engineering courses. He has held academic appointments at Florida State University and Georgia Tech; has served as a National Science Foundation rotator, worked in the Executive Office of the President, and was executive director of the Committee on Science and Technology in the U.S. House of Representatives. He is a member of ACM and IEEE and a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. He holds a Ph.D. in information and computer science from Georgia Tech. FRANCISCO J. SAMANIEGO is professor in the Intercollege Division of Statistics and Director of the Teaching Resources Center at the University of California at Davis. He has held visiting appointments in the Department of Statistics at Florida State University and in the Department of Biostatistics at the University of Washington. His research interests include mathematical statistics, decision theory, reliability theory and survival analysis, and statistical applications, primarily in the fields of education, engineering and public health. He is a fellow of the American Statistical Association, the Institute of Mathematical Statistics, and the Royal Statistical Society and is a member of the International Statistical Institute. He received a B.S. degree from Loyola University of Los Angeles, an M.S. degree from Ohio State University, and a Ph.D. from the University of California, Los Angeles, all in mathematics. DENNIS E. SMALLWOOD is a senior economist with RAND, where he conducts research related to national security, including defense acquisition, industrial base, and costing issues. He has held previous positions at the Pentagon, working on strategic arms control issues; he also served as head of the Economic Analysis and Resource Planning Division, Assistant Secretary of Defense for Program Analysis and Evaluation. He was previously an associate professor of economics at the University of California, San Diego, where he worked on issues related to the economics of health and of law. He received B.A. and M.A. degrees in mathematics from the University of Michigan and a Ph.D. degree in economics from Yale University. DUANE L. STEFFEY is senior program officer with the Committee on National Statistics, and he served as the panel study director until July 1995. Concurrently, he is associate professor of mathematical sciences at San Diego State University, where he teaches courses in Bayesian statistics, statistical computing, and categorical data analysis. He previously worked at Westinghouse and was involved in conducting probabilistic risk assessment of commercial nuclear energy facilities. He engages broadly in interdisciplinary research and consulting, and current professional interests include applications of statistics in environmental monitoring, transportation demand modeling, and census methodology. He received a B.S. degree and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in statistics, all from Carnegie Mellon University.