Biographical Sketches of Panel Members and Staff

ERIC A. HANUSHEK (Chair) is professor of economics and public policy and director of the W. Allen Wallis Institute of Political Economy at the University of Rochester. He was formerly deputy director of the Congressional Budget Office and is a past president of the Association for Public Policy Analysis and Management. A member of the Committee on National Statistics, he previously held academic appointments at Yale University and the U.S. Air Force Academy and governmental appointments at the Cost of Living Council and the Council of Economic Advisers. His research has involved applied public finance and public policy analysis, with special reference to schooling and aspects of income determination. He received a Ph.D. degree in economics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

ALAN J. AUERBACH is Robert D. Burch Professor of Economics and Law at the University of California, Berkeley. He previously taught at the University of Pennsylvania, where he was chairman of the Economics Department. In 1992, he served as deputy chief of staff of the U.S. Joint Committee on Taxation. His research has addressed fiscal theory and policy, business finance and investment, the effects of tax provisions on firm behavior, and the impact of changing demographics on fiscal balance. He is a fellow of the Econometric Society and co-editor of the Journal of Economic Perspectives. He received a B.A. degree from Yale University and a Ph.D. degree from Harvard University.

CONSTANCE F. CITRO (Study Director) is a member of the staff of the Committee on National Statistics. She is a former vice president and deputy director of Mathematica Policy Research, Inc., and was an American Statistical Association/National Science Foundation (NSF) research fellow at the Bureau of the Census. For the Committee on National Statistics, she has served as study director for the Panel on Poverty and Family Assistance, the Panel to Evaluate the Survey of Income and Program Participation, the Panel to Evaluate Microsimulation Models for Social Welfare Programs, the Panel to Study the NSF Scientific and Technical Personnel Data System, and the Panel on Decennial Census Methodology. Her research has focused on the usefulness and accessibility of large, complex microdata files, as well as analysis related to income measurement and demographic change. She is a fellow of the American Statistical Association. She received a B.A. degree from the University of Rochester and M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in political science from Yale University.



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OCR for page 53
Toward Improved Modeling of Retirement Income Policies: Interim Report Biographical Sketches of Panel Members and Staff ERIC A. HANUSHEK (Chair) is professor of economics and public policy and director of the W. Allen Wallis Institute of Political Economy at the University of Rochester. He was formerly deputy director of the Congressional Budget Office and is a past president of the Association for Public Policy Analysis and Management. A member of the Committee on National Statistics, he previously held academic appointments at Yale University and the U.S. Air Force Academy and governmental appointments at the Cost of Living Council and the Council of Economic Advisers. His research has involved applied public finance and public policy analysis, with special reference to schooling and aspects of income determination. He received a Ph.D. degree in economics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. ALAN J. AUERBACH is Robert D. Burch Professor of Economics and Law at the University of California, Berkeley. He previously taught at the University of Pennsylvania, where he was chairman of the Economics Department. In 1992, he served as deputy chief of staff of the U.S. Joint Committee on Taxation. His research has addressed fiscal theory and policy, business finance and investment, the effects of tax provisions on firm behavior, and the impact of changing demographics on fiscal balance. He is a fellow of the Econometric Society and co-editor of the Journal of Economic Perspectives. He received a B.A. degree from Yale University and a Ph.D. degree from Harvard University. CONSTANCE F. CITRO (Study Director) is a member of the staff of the Committee on National Statistics. She is a former vice president and deputy director of Mathematica Policy Research, Inc., and was an American Statistical Association/National Science Foundation (NSF) research fellow at the Bureau of the Census. For the Committee on National Statistics, she has served as study director for the Panel on Poverty and Family Assistance, the Panel to Evaluate the Survey of Income and Program Participation, the Panel to Evaluate Microsimulation Models for Social Welfare Programs, the Panel to Study the NSF Scientific and Technical Personnel Data System, and the Panel on Decennial Census Methodology. Her research has focused on the usefulness and accessibility of large, complex microdata files, as well as analysis related to income measurement and demographic change. She is a fellow of the American Statistical Association. She received a B.A. degree from the University of Rochester and M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in political science from Yale University.

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Toward Improved Modeling of Retirement Income Policies: Interim Report NANCY L. MARITATO is a consultant for the Committee on National Statistics. She served as a research associate for the committee's Panel on Poverty and Family Assistance and other studies and recently worked as an economist in the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. She received B.A. and M.A. degrees in economics from the University of Wisconsin, where she is currently working on a Ph.D. degree in economics. She was previously a research assistant at the Institute for Research on Poverty at the University of Wisconsin and a junior staff economist with the President's Council of Economic Advisers. Her interests lie in poverty and welfare policy analysis. OLIVIA S. MITCHELL is the International Foundation of Employee Benefit Plans Professor of Insurance and Risk Management at the Wharton School. She previously was a professor of labor economics at Cornell University. Her research focuses on the economics of private and public insurance, particularly employee benefits, pensions, and Social Security. She is a member of the National Bureau of Economic Research and the National Academy of Social Insurance and sits on the editorial boards of the Industrial and Labor Relations Review and the Journal of Risk and Insurance. She has consulted for several agencies on pension and retirement issues, including the U.S. Department of Labor, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, the General Accounting Office, the U.S. Agency for International Development, the World Bank, and the International Monetary Fund. She received a B.S. from Harvard University and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees from the University of Wisconsin-Madison, all in economics. SAMUEL H. PRESTON is Frederick J. Warren Professor of Demography and member of the Population Studies Center at the University of Pennsylvania. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and a member (and former chair) of the Committee on Population in the Commission on Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education. His research has been in mathematical demography, mortality, and family demography. He received a Ph.D. degree in economics from Princeton University. JOHN P. RUST is professor of economics at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. He has a strong methodological background, having conducted econometric and time-series analyses of decisions that determine labor force participation and income during retirement. He received a Ph.D. degree from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. TIMOTHY M. SMEEDING is professor of economics and public administration and director of the Center for Policy Research at Syracuse University. He was a fellow at the Center for Advanced Studies in the Behavioral Sciences at Palo Alto, California in 1994-1995. He also serves as project director for the Luxembourg Income Study, a multinational effort to build comparable databases for comparative analysis of income distribution, poverty, and other socioeconomic variables across countries. His research is in the areas of the economics of public policy, the economics of aging, and comparative international social policy. He received a Ph.D. degree in economics from the University of Wisconsin. JAMES P. SMITH is director of the Labor and Population Studies Program at the RAND Corporation in Santa Monica, California. He is a member of the National Research Council's Committee on Research on the Urban Underclass and the Commission on Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education's Committee on Population. His research has addressed labor market behavior of minorities and labor economics generally. He received a Ph.D. degree in economics from the University of Chicago.