it is difficult to move from one level of aggregation to another (for example, to infer the effects of a large-scale program from results of a demonstration program in a few schools). Christopher Elias expressed similar doubts about the generalizability of results of impact evaluations, since so much depends on how the programs were implemented.

SUMMARY

Amy Tsui summarized questions that had recurred in the discussion of seemingly disparate topics: What are the behaviors that are of most importance for improving reproductive health? What are the effective interventions, and how feasible and affordable are they? And how confident should we be that we know the answers to these questions? Tsui suggested that it would be important to get more information on sexual behavior as an antecedent to risky behaviors. Research on all types of services is needed to help define the terms of the trade-offs among quality, effectiveness, and coverage. She concluded the meeting on an optimistic note. The contraceptive revolution has shown that large-scale changes in ideas and behavior can be achieved in a matter of a few decades, much shorter periods than anyone dared hope in the 1960s. Achieving many reproductive health goals may require a more complex mix of services than was the case with early family planning programs, greater efforts at generating demand, and the ability to sustain services over long periods, but there are no grounds for thinking these changes infeasible.



The National Academies | 500 Fifth St. N.W. | Washington, D.C. 20001
Copyright © National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.
Terms of Use and Privacy Statement



Below are the first 10 and last 10 pages of uncorrected machine-read text (when available) of this chapter, followed by the top 30 algorithmically extracted key phrases from the chapter as a whole.
Intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text on the opening pages of each chapter. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

Do not use for reproduction, copying, pasting, or reading; exclusively for search engines.

OCR for page 22
Reproductive Health Interventions: Report of a Meeting it is difficult to move from one level of aggregation to another (for example, to infer the effects of a large-scale program from results of a demonstration program in a few schools). Christopher Elias expressed similar doubts about the generalizability of results of impact evaluations, since so much depends on how the programs were implemented. SUMMARY Amy Tsui summarized questions that had recurred in the discussion of seemingly disparate topics: What are the behaviors that are of most importance for improving reproductive health? What are the effective interventions, and how feasible and affordable are they? And how confident should we be that we know the answers to these questions? Tsui suggested that it would be important to get more information on sexual behavior as an antecedent to risky behaviors. Research on all types of services is needed to help define the terms of the trade-offs among quality, effectiveness, and coverage. She concluded the meeting on an optimistic note. The contraceptive revolution has shown that large-scale changes in ideas and behavior can be achieved in a matter of a few decades, much shorter periods than anyone dared hope in the 1960s. Achieving many reproductive health goals may require a more complex mix of services than was the case with early family planning programs, greater efforts at generating demand, and the ability to sustain services over long periods, but there are no grounds for thinking these changes infeasible.