HUMAN FACTORS IN THE DESIGN OF TACTICAL DISPLAY SYSTEMS FOR THE INDIVIDUAL SOLDIER: PHASE I

Panel on Human Factors in the Design of Tactical Display Systems for the Individual Soldier

Committee on Human Factors

Commission on Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education

National Research Council

NATIONAL ACADEMY PRESS
Washington, D.C.
1995



The National Academies | 500 Fifth St. N.W. | Washington, D.C. 20001
Copyright © National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.
Terms of Use and Privacy Statement



Below are the first 10 and last 10 pages of uncorrected machine-read text (when available) of this chapter, followed by the top 30 algorithmically extracted key phrases from the chapter as a whole.
Intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text on the opening pages of each chapter. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

Do not use for reproduction, copying, pasting, or reading; exclusively for search engines.

OCR for page R1
HUMAN FACTORS IN THE DESIGN OF TACTICAL DISPLAY SYSTEMS FOR THE INDIVIDUAL SOLDIER: PHASE I HUMAN FACTORS IN THE DESIGN OF TACTICAL DISPLAY SYSTEMS FOR THE INDIVIDUAL SOLDIER: PHASE I Panel on Human Factors in the Design of Tactical Display Systems for the Individual Soldier Committee on Human Factors Commission on Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education National Research Council NATIONAL ACADEMY PRESS Washington, D.C. 1995

OCR for page R1
HUMAN FACTORS IN THE DESIGN OF TACTICAL DISPLAY SYSTEMS FOR THE INDIVIDUAL SOLDIER: PHASE I NOTICE: The project that is the subject of this report was approved by the Governing Board of the National Research Council, whose members are drawn from the councils of the National Academy of Sciences, the National Academy of Engineering, and the Institute of Medicine. The members of the committee responsible for the report were chosen for their special competences and with regard for appropriate balance. This report has been reviewed by a group other than the authors according to procedures approved by a Report Review Committee consisting of members of the National Academy of Sciences, the National Academy of Engineering, and the Institute of Medicine. The National Academy of Sciences is a private, nonprofit, self-perpetuating society of distinguished scholars engaged in scientific and engineering research, dedicated to the furtherance of science and technology and to their use for the general welfare. Upon the authority of the charter granted to it by the Congress in 1863, the Academy has a mandate that requires it to advise the federal government on scientific and technical matters. Dr. Bruce M. Alberts is president of the National Academy of Sciences. The National Academy of Engineering was established in 1964, under the charter of the National Academy of Sciences, as a parallel organization of outstanding engineers. It is autonomous in its administration and in the selection of its members, sharing with the National Academy of Sciences the responsibility for advising the federal government. The National Academy of Engineering also sponsors engineering programs aimed at meeting national needs, encourages education and research, and recognizes the superior achievements of engineers. Dr. Robert M. White is president of the National Academy of Engineering. The Institute of Medicine was established in 1970 by the National Academy of Sciences to secure the services of eminent members of appropriate professions in the examination of policy matters pertaining to the health of the public. The Institute acts under the responsibility given to the National Academy of Sciences by its congressional charter to be an adviser to the federal government and, upon its own initiative, to identify issues of medical care, research, and education. Dr. Kenneth I. Shine is president of the Institute of Medicine. The National Research Council was organized by the National Academy of Sciences in 1916 to associate the broad community of science and technology with the Academy's purposes of furthering knowledge and advising the federal government. Functioning in accordance with general policies determined by the Academy, the Council has become the principal operating agency of both the National Academy of Sciences and the National Academy of Engineering in providing services to the government, the public, and the scientific and engineering communities. The Council is administered jointly by both Academies and the Institute of Medicine. Dr. Bruce M. Alberts and Dr. Robert M. White are chairman and vice chairman, respectively, of the National Research Council. The work of the Panel on Human Factors in the Design of Tactical Display Systems for the Individual Soldier is supported by Department of the Army Contract No. DAAD05-92-C-0087 issued by the U.S. Army Natick Research Development and Engineering Center. The views and opinions, and findings contained in this report are those of the authors(s) and should not be construed as an official Department of the Army position, policy, or decision, unless so designated by other official documentation. Additional copies of this report are available from: Committee on Human Factors National Research Council HA 178 2101 Constitution Avenue N.W. Washington, D.C. 20418 Copyright 1995 by the National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved. Printed in the United States of America

OCR for page R1
HUMAN FACTORS IN THE DESIGN OF TACTICAL DISPLAY SYSTEMS FOR THE INDIVIDUAL SOLDIER: PHASE I PANEL ON HUMAN FACTORS IN THE DESIGN OF TACTICAL DISPLAY SYSTEMS FOR THE INDIVIDUAL SOLDIER WILLIAM O. BLACKWOOD (Chair), Hay Management Consultants, Inc. TIMOTHY R. ANDERSON, Armstrong Laboratory, Wright-Patterson, Air Force Base, Ohio WOODROW BARFIELD, Department of Industrial Engineering, University of Washington C. THOMAS BENNETT, Lawrence Livermore Laboratory, University of California at Berkeley COL. JOHN R. CORSON (retired), Integrated Visual Learning, Newport News, Virginia MICA R. ENDSLEY, Texas Tech University, Lubbock PETER A. HANCOCK, University of Minnesota JULIAN HOCHBERG, Columbia University JAMES E. HOFFMAN, University of Delaware RONALD V. KRUK, CAE Electronics, Ltd., Quebec, Canada BEVERLY M. HUEY, Study Director CINDY S. PRINCE, Senior Project Assistant

OCR for page R1
HUMAN FACTORS IN THE DESIGN OF TACTICAL DISPLAY SYSTEMS FOR THE INDIVIDUAL SOLDIER: PHASE I COMMITTEE ON HUMAN FACTORS WILLIAM B. ROUSE (Chair), Search Technology, Inc., Norcross, Georgia TERRY CONNOLLY, Department of Management and Policy, University of Arizona PAUL S. GOODMAN, Center for Management of Technology, Carnegie Mellon University JOHN D. GOULD, IBM Corporation (retired), Yorktown Heights, New York ROBERT L. HELMREICH, NASA/UT Aerospace Crew Research Project, Austin, Texas WILLIAM C. HOWELL, American Psychological Association Science Directorate, Washington, D.C. ROBERTA L. KLATZKY, Department of Psychology, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania TOM B. LEAMON, Liberty Mutual Research Center, Hopkinton, Massachusetts HERSCHEL W. LEIBOWITZ, Department of Psychology, Pennsylvania State University ANN MAJCHRZAK, Human Factors Department, University of Southern California BENJAMIN SCHNEIDER, Department of Psychology, University of Maryland LAWRENCE W. STARK, School of Optometry, University of California at Berkeley EARL WIENER, Department of Management Science, University of Miami LAURENCE R. YOUNG, Man Vehicle Laboratory, Massachusetts Institute of Technology ANNE S. MAVOR, Director JERRY KIDD, Senior Staff Officer EVELYN E. SIMEON, Senior Project Assistant

OCR for page R1
HUMAN FACTORS IN THE DESIGN OF TACTICAL DISPLAY SYSTEMS FOR THE INDIVIDUAL SOLDIER: PHASE I ACKNOWLEDGMENTS The Panel on Human Factors in the Design of Tactical Display Systems for the Individual Soldier extends its sincere appreciation for the invaluable assistance and information provided by numerous representatives of the Army in the initial phase of our work. First, we particularly thank Cynthia Blackwell, the sponsor representative from the U.S. Army Natick Research, Development and Engineering Center (Natick RD&E) for arranging the panel's visit to the Infantry School at Fort Benning, Georgia and for briefing us on Land Warrior System contractor activities. Second, we thank Captain Gregory Dyekman of the Infantry School for taking care of our logistic needs and for scheduling special demonstrations of Soldier Integrated Protective Ensemble (SIPE) and night vision equipment during our visit. Third, we thank all the individuals who briefed the panel at the Infantry School in September and during our Washington, D.C. meeting in December: Major Marc Collins, Project Manager-Soldier; Captain William Dickey, Major Ronald Murray, Sergeant Richardson, and Staff Sergeant Weiser of the Infantry School; Mr. Bernard Corona, Army Research Laboratory; and Mr. Patrick Snow, Jr., U.S. Natick RD&E Center. Finally, we thank all those at the Battle Lab and the Night Vision Lab who participated in special equipment demonstrations for the Panel with particular acknowledgement to Lieutenant Colonel Ross Holden, Captain Ed Jennings, and Captain Scott O'Neil. William O. Blackwood, Chair Panel on Human Factors in the Design of Tactical Display Systems for the Individual Soldier

OCR for page R1
HUMAN FACTORS IN THE DESIGN OF TACTICAL DISPLAY SYSTEMS FOR THE INDIVIDUAL SOLDIER: PHASE I This page in the original is blank.